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Garrettsville – James A Garfield principal Michael Dobran announced today that Jason Richmond has  been named  a  Commended Student in the 2015 National Merit Scholarship Program. A Letter of Commendation from the school and National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC), which conducts the program, will be presented by the principal to this  scholastically talented senior.

About 34,000 Commended Students throughout the nation are being recognized for their exceptional academic promise. Although they will not continue in the 2015 competition for National Merit Scholarship awards, Commended Students placed among the top five percent of more than 1.5 million students who entered the 2015 competition by taking the 2013 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT®).

“The young men and women being named Commended Students have demonstrated outstanding potential for academic success,” commented a spokesperson for NMSC. “These students represent a valuable national resource; recognizing their accomplishments, as well as the key role their schools play in their academic development, is vital to the advancement of educational excellence in our nation. We hope that this recognition will help broaden their educational opportunities and encourage them as they continue their pursuit of academic success.”

Rootstown – Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) continued the celebration of its 40th anniversary and campus expansion efforts with the dedication of the NEOMED Education and Wellness (NEW) Center on Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. During the dedication, Summa Health System of Akron, Ohio, announced that it will be offering on-site, primary care services to the community beginning in 2015.

The 177,000-square-foot facility was made possible through a public-private partnership between NEOMED, Signet Development and Integrated Wellness Partners and is a major step in shifting the overall culture of health and wellness for the campus and surrounding community. The NEW Center provides medical education alongside a state-of-the-art fitness environment, physicians’ offices, advanced practice pharmacy services, conference and event space and more.

“This facility not only grows our campus in an exciting new way, but it is the cornerstone of our community wellness initiatives,” said Jay A. Gershen, D.D.S., Ph.D., president of Northeast Ohio Medical University. “By collaborating with other health professionals, NEOMED is bringing an innovative vision of health and fitness to Portage County, one that promotes true wellness by addressing every avenue of care to develop and sustain healthy, active lifestyles.”

These synergies between education and wellness are further enhanced through a new partnership with Summa Health System, which will be occupying 7,000-square-feet of outfitted space on the first floor of the NEW Center in the coming year. The health system will offer comprehensive primary care, non-emergency daytime walk-in care, corporate and employee health services, pharmacy consultation,  physical therapy and lab services to the NEOMED and Rootstown communities, while also serving as a training ground for NEOMED students.

“We are excited to enhance even more our longstanding relationship with NEOMED,” said Summa Health System President and CEO, Tom Strauss. “As we continue to transform the delivery of health care away from a model of sick care to one that truly promotes healthy living, having outstanding facilities such as the NEOMED Education and Wellness Center is critical. I applaud the community for coming together to make this initiative possible, and we are proud to be involved in such an important way.”

In addition to addressing the primary health care needs of the community, the NEW Center offers first-floor amenities focused on nutrition and physical wellness. Two new public eateries, the Bistro and Erie Island Coffee House, offer healthy eating options, and Sequoia Wellness, a facility that focuses on building healthier communities by encouraging a comprehensive view of wellness that incorporates fitness, nutrition, exercise, education and more, has memberships available to the community and campus. The Conference and Event Center, located on the second floor, can host formal and informal events for up to 500 guests and will be utilized for professional and community meetings, lectures and presentations about medical field advancements, as well as personal events such as weddings, services and other private gatherings.

As a medical university, education also plays a large part in the overall use of the NEW Center. A state-of-the-art lecture hall serves as a main educational classroom for interprofessional and college-centric learning for students on the NEOMED campus;  the third floor of the facility is dedicated to Bio-Med Science Academy, the public STEM+M high school on NEOMED’s campus.

“We are truly honored to be a part of the extraordinary campus transformation at NEOMED and our team is delighted to collaborate with the University on a project that is already enriching the academic experience for NEOMED students, enhancing the delivery of health care services for the community, and creating a hub of activity on-campus for all of Portage County,” said Tony S. Manna, chairman of Signet Enterprises, LLC.

Connect directly with the NEW Center at http://www.neomed.edu/newcenter.

Mantua – Last Friday, on a gorgeous fall day, the kids at Crestwood Primary and Intermediate Schools strapped on their sneakers to raise money for field trips, field day, and educational opportunities at their schools. Instead of hitting the sidewalks to sell candy, wrapping paper, or other items to family and friends; to raise much-needed funds, parents and their students sought out community sponsors. They asked for support, not just of the schools, but for student wellness, as well.

crestwood-mantua-walkathon-october-2014-outdoorOver the course of the school day, each student in every class — from preschool through grade five — as well as teachers and staff — took a one-mile hike around the perimeter of the campus. Their teachers led the way through the campus green space, wearing pedometers to track the number of steps. At the end of the day, the grand total of 1,287,442 steps was reached — or nearly 130 miles!

Students wore shirts to signify their grade levels; Preschool wore light blue, Kindergarten in yellow, first graders were in dark blue, 2nd graders wore orange, 3rd graders wore red, 4th was in grey, with 5th graders in white. And most everyone wore a smile as they enjoyed being outdoors for the school-wide activity.

In addition to raising an estimated $2,500 per school, the event also raised awareness of healthy choices. Before starting their walk, students warmed up by jumping rope and using hula-hoops. One first-grade participant rejoiced, saying, “Watch me — I was made to hula hoop!” Halfway through their hike, participants stopped for a water and music break. Accompanied by such songs as ‘These Boots Are Made for Walking’ and “Happy,” they continued their trek, refreshed, and with a kick in their step.  After completing their mile, each participant received a healthy snack of apple slices and a bottle of water, courtesy of McDonalds & Subway in Mantua, and Giant Eagle in Ravenna.

Event sponsors included: Ace’s Well Service, Sayre Construction, Fortis College, RDP Printing, Star Therapy, Streetsboro Family Days/ Allen Alloy, Coldwell Banker Streetsboro, Mantua Station Drug, NAPA, Oscar Brugmann Sand & Gravel, OK Brugmann Jr & Sons Inc., Aurora Auto Wash, Candance Academy, Piranha Technologies, Trinity Farm, Varkala Services, Inc., F & S Automotive, Carlton Harley Davidson, Kuchenbecker Farms, Express Systems, Sunshine Cupcakes, Advanced Rehab, Montgomery’s Pallet Service, Derthick’s Farm, Portage Trim, Gateway Towing, Kristoff Electric, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Crestwood Intermediate School Staff, Valerie Agle (Equestrian Vet Clinic), and Streetsboro Sports Medicine – Dr. Bartsokas.

Due to the success of this first-time event, teachers, staff, and parent volunteers look forward to holding it again next year.

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Across the world, many nations are engaged in political conflicts. At the same time, millions of paper pinwheels emblazoned with childrens’ messages of peace and hope spin worldwide, in places like South America, the Middle East, and even Mantua, Ohio. Last Friday, Crestwood students from kindergarten through grade five planted hand-made pinwheels at Crestwood Intermediate & Primary Schools to help commemorate the International Day of Peace.

Pinwheels for Peace is an art installation project started nine years ago by teachers in Florida as a way for students to express their feelings about what was happening in their lives, and in the world around them. In the first year of the project, groups in over 1,325 locations around the world were spinning nearly 500,000 pinwheels on the International Day of Peace. Last year, over four million pinwheels were spinning in over 3,500 locations, including the United States, Europe, Asia, Australia, Canada, the Middle East, Africa and South America.

Locally, School Counselor Gary Traveny coordinated the project. He explained, “This project is non-political. Peace doesn’t necessarily have to be associated with the conflict of war, it can be related to violence or intolerance in our daily lives.”  To participate, each student created a pinwheel; one side features their thoughts on peace, tolerance, and living in harmony, they drew images to express their feelings on the opposite side.

The school-wide program was held outdoors on a crisp, autumn day and featured student-read poetry and music performed by the fifth grade choir. Afterwards, students planted their pinwheels around the grounds of Crestwood’s Primary and Intermediate Schools. In addition, children received a special bookmark to remember their part in supporting “whirled peace.”

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Hiram – Little Village Early Learning Center at Hiram Christian Church celebrated the dedication of their new outdoor classroom and playground on September 16, 2014 at 4:30PM.  The ribbon cutting was a culmination of months of planning, cooperation and coordination between Little Village and its many partners, including Hiram College, Kiwanis of the Western Reserve and Hiram Village as well as individual families and churches.

Hiram College education professor and Little Village Advisory Committee member, Jennifer McCreight, observed, “The dedication of the playground is just the latest in a long string of events that have made clear the Hiram community supports Little Village.  Having worked on the playground with multiple classes, and watching as it grew in size and scope due to generous donations and creative vision, I see the contributions of so many when I step back and admire it today.”  Highlights of this one-of-a-kind toddler and preschool friendly playground include an outdoor mud kitchen, drum area made from creatively repurposed materials, raised bed flower and vegetable gardens, a tree shaped play structure, and a tricycle track complete with gas station.

The playground will be used by the school during their hours of operation, 7AM-6PM, and is open to the public after hours and on weekends.    For more information, call Little Village Early Learning Center at 330-569-7101 or visit littlevillagehiram.org.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot?

Nah.  Come to the  James A. Garfield Alumni Banquet and remember all that good old stuff with good old friends AND good food .  Yup.  It was a good one.

The organizing committee members—Helen Louise Paul Bouts, Elaine Lange Duffield, Ruth Becks Herrington, Bonnie Ball Oliver, Kit Younker Semplak, Judy Davison Toth, Carolyn Lange Unaitis, Sherri Seals Collins, Tom Collins, Christine Lumbert Pitsinger and Ted Lysiak—put together a fine meal catered by Guido’s, floral décor by Art N Flowers, reminiscences by all sorts of folks and an introduction to the new addition to the Garfield Elementary building which had just had its official ribbon cut at ten o’clock that very morning.  The James A. Garfield Marching Pride made a cameo appearance to greet the early arrivers before heading off to a band show at Stow-Monroe Falls High School, where they wowed the crowd in the name of the district.

Classes of special recognition—1944(Yay, Dick Davis and Helen Lewis Manlove), 1954, 1964 and 1994)were presented with some memory-joggers about the prices of things like gas and houses during their salad days.  Board of Education president Guy Pietra was the Peerless Speaker and board vice president David Vincent offered the blessing.  The look at the new addition, built through the $5million Straight A Grant (The only application to receive unanimous approval) to produce a Campus of Excellence, was an eye-opener and a source of pride…mingled, no doubt, with amazement.  Any food not consumed on the spot was donated to the Center of Hope as a community outreach.

It was a fine old time with friends and family (note the number of Collinses and Andrewses, among others, in attendance) and the date has already been set for the next one.  Mark your calendars for September 19, 2015, same time , same place.  Everybody learn the Alma Mater!

There’s a story about that.

Windham – In today’s world, peace needs to become more than just a word. Students at KT Elementary School took part in an International art and literacy project, Pinwheels for Peace by “planting” pinwheels with messages of peace at their school in Windham.

Garrettsville – The James A. Garfield Local School District cut a ribbon on Saturday, September 20 marking the amazing (120 days!) completion of the addition to the James A. Garfield Elementary School, bringing about the relocation of the district’s fifth and sixth graders to the Campus of Excellence, with all of the system’s students sharing the same venue.  This was made possible through a $5million Straight A Grant from the State of Ohio(The only application to have received unanimous approval) and through the outstanding efforts of a blue-ribbon design and construction team—including local firms  Scotchman Electric(Scott Russell), Doug Seaman Decorating and Rocky Gardens Landscaping(DeanHorvath).  The application process opened one year, to the day, before the ribbon-cutting ceremony and was a total team effort, spearheaded by Superintendent Ted Lysiak and Treasurer Tracy Knauer. Board members, administrators, educators, staff members, students and a community advisory group all played a part in the final concept.

With the awarding of the grant, the clock began ticking and the race was on!

Bob McCullough of Hammond Construction, Melanie Friedman of FMD Architects spoke briefly of the challenges faced.  Charlie Fury, superintendent of the whole construction project, was praised.

Guy Pietra, Board President, and Rick Patrick, Mayor of Garrettsville, offered thanks and appreciation to key players who were major factors in the co-operating elements which made the timeline work—Don Long, Carrie  Dornack, principals; Ellen Rybak, GEA president; maintenance and custodial staff; students and teachers; village maintenance crews and permitting bodies.  It was an over-all effort, one illustration of which was the newly-waxed floors   of the building, done early that morning by Elementary head custodian, Judy Gyulai, since “her” building is now “our”  building and she’s proud.

The refreshments and the tour were icing on the cake.

It’s not just about the building.  It’s about BUILDING for the future.

Garrettsville – James A. Garfield High School’s Marching Pride Band took this past weekend by storm as they performed four times in 24 hours.

Garrettsville-James-A-Garfield-Marching-Pride-BandFriday afternoon, the band loaded the buses and headed to Waterloo for the football game. They performed what they refer to as their show one tunes, which were “Moves Like Jagger,” “Treasure,” “Pompeii,” and “Can’t Hold Us,” The band, as usual, really rocked it out. Besides the half-time show, the band played numerous snippets of tunes in the stands to keep the crowd in the game. The band returned to the school at 10:30 pm knowing they would be back in the morning for what many dubbed “the longest day.”

On Saturday, they went right back to it.  They loaded the buses and headed for Hiram College. The Marching Pride was scheduled to play the pregame and half-time shows for the college’s homecoming. The “Pride” took the college by storm as they played like never before. They played “Moves like Jagger,” Treasure,” “Pompeii,” “Hang on Sloopy,” and then the National Anthem.  Folks in the stands heard compliments from many of the fans sitting around them. Some even asked how does a band that size sound like they have 500 instruments rather than 100, and are you sure that is a high school band?  Etc. The Pride once again did Garfield Schools proud.

The band kicked it in high gear as they performed the half-time show at the college. They once again impressed the alumni and the fans with their performance selecting tunes they have played at the football games this season. The band was treated to lunch of hot dogs, chips and Gatorade before boarding the buses to return to the school.

The students then had an hour to rest before performing before the alumni at the annual alumni dinner. The band treated the alumni to the school’s Alma Mater, the Fight Song and “Hang on Sloopy.” The kids, chaperones and band directors had been at it all day and they were starting wear down, but were hanging tough.

2014 Marching Pride

2014 Marching Pride

Following the alumni performance, the band boarded buses to head to the Stow Band Show for their final performance of the night.  There were eight bands scheduled to perform in the program which appeared to be done according to band size. This put the Marching Pride third on the program. The Marching Pride wowed the crowd with their music and moves on the field, and once again the fans in the stands reported they had heard numerous compliments on the band’s performance.

The evening did not end with the bands scheduled slot time. The Pride and their fans were treated to grand finale of nearly 1000 instruments playing one song together.  The eight bands honored those who are serving and have served our country by performing Lee Greenwood’s hit, “God Bless the USA.”  The grand finale` sent chills down one’s spine and gave everyone an idea of what a 1,000 instrument band would sound like.  It was awesome, and a great way to finish off the longest day  — STRONG!

We did it!  The James A. Garfield Local Schools used funds from a $5 Million State Grant to create a “Campus of Excellence” that will enhance education for children in our district for decades to come. The district will celebrate this wonderful accomplishment on Saturday, September 20 at 10am with a ribbon cutting ceremony that will be open to the public.

Facility Construction

A 17,000 square foot addition to the elementary school was constructed for our fifth and sixth grade students. This addition brought all 1,500 students to one campus and will save taxpayers over $300,000 annually in operational savings. A professional development center is now open and can be used as a multi-purpose space for staff training and as well as public use.

Technology Enhancements

Upgrades in the district’s technology infrastructure now support a new generation of learning tools for students. Computers have been given to every student in grades 7-12. Laptop carts were purchased for each grade level at the elementary school. We are capable of meeting the demands of 21st Century Learning!

Expanded Partnerships

The Greater Cleveland YMCA is now managing youth soccer, flag football and basketball. The YMCA will also be running a Silver Sneakers program in the Park Avenue School. The Portage County Educational Service Center is using classroom space at the building for a special needs preschool.  Both groups have plans to bring even more services to our community.

We could not have done this alone. Because you play an important role in making education better for our students, we are requesting your attendance at the official ribbon cutting ceremony. The event will take place on Saturday, September 20, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at James A. Garfield Elementary School.

We are proud of our accomplishments over the past six months and even more excited about our future. We hope you are able to take the time to celebrate excellence with us.

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Windham Board of Education (BOE) held their regularly-scheduled meeting on August 28, 2014 at the high school.

Melissa Roubic presented the Maplewood report.  The biggest news to report was the summer construction of the animal science lab, is now completed. This is a new program added to the Maplewood Career Center and it appears to be a hit with the students.

The superintendent Gregg Isler reported that the feed back from the animal science program at Maplewood Career Center has been good. He also reported that the district once again is trying athletic passes. Adult passes will be $40 and they will receive 10 passes to use at the sporting event of their choice. Student passes are $25 and again that will get them 10 passes to use at the event of their choice.  Passes are good until the end of the school year.

The enrollment is now down nine students from last year. As of August 28, 2014, there are 585 students enrolled in the district.

Jr. /Sr. high school report was summarized by Mr. Isler as Mr. Chaffee was coaching a volleyball game. Chaffee will email the board members a full report.  Isler stated that Mr. Chaffee has met with all the grades and went over the handbook. Students entering the 6th grade had all the changes mailed out to them.

Mr. Kujala was unavailable for the meeting and turned in a written report.  Kujala reported that they added Cori Morrison to the high school special education services team and added Miss Leah Kook to special education services as well. Kook will work in Katherine Thomas (KT) Elementary in the morning as a 1st grade intervention specialist. She will also work with Miss Kovach in the preschool department in the afternoon.

The spring OGT’s were in and students with disabilities scores had dramatically improved over the previous year. The special services will continue working with these students, helping them improve their scores.

In transportation, Craig Alderman reported that the bus radios are working out well  and have been a great help with communicating. One bus failed inspections over the summer and the district had to replaced door at a cost of $1593.82 in order to bring the bus into compliance. The bus now is in compliance and ready to roll.

In food service, Samantha Pochedly reported that she has met with the manager of Pizza Hut in Garrettsville and they have program that allows schools to use  Pizza Hut’s school-style pizza in their cafeterias. Pochedly says they are working out the details and the school-style pizza meets all the government standards for fat, whole grain and salt.

In other BOE news, the board approved the hiring list of certified substitutes, OAPSE Negotiated Agreement effective July 1, 2014 – June 30 2017, three supplemental contracts and the noncertified substitute list. Lastly, they approved the agreement with Robinson Hospital for athletic training services. The contract is for the 2014-2015 school year and will cost the district $4928.00.

The next BOE meeting is September 26, 2014 at 6:30 pm at KT Elementary.

It’s that time again.

School has begun and so have a number of other activities.  Most of them could use some volunteers to keep things moving along and produce the best outcomes for all concerned.

Booster groups of every stripe need help in their fund-raising  activities.  Picture yourself hustling hot dogs at a game or topping off a root beer float for sale to a thirsty customer.  Statisticians and scorekeepers are frequently in short supply—the season gets longer with every game gone by and more looming into the winter. The chain gang at football games is NOT made up of elves who live under the bleachers, you know.   Somebody has to help with and/or supervise the clean-up—indoors or outdoors, a mess is a mess.  Tickets must be sold and accounted for.  Merchandise, ditto.  Elementary schools have activities going on all of the time that could use a little adult supervision and contribution…of course, it behooves one to act like an adult and actually be a  desirable role model in addition to counting coupons or putting up pictures, or whatever.  Act responsibly so kids can see how it looks; they get enough of the bad stuff on TV.

Community groups—Lions, Rotary, Kiwanis, Eagles, Masons& Eastern Stars, church folks, etc.—are always looking for help and support.  New in town?  Show up to make new friends and get all of the latest on what’s happening around and about(The jungle telegraph has direct lines to many of the most active).  Have you a hobby?  Dollars to doughnuts there’ll be someone around who shares your interest, or would, if you’d get out and promote it(I’m still mulling over an offer to take up horseshoes).

There are things to do, places to go, people to see.  In the immortal words of Auntie Mame, “Life is a banquet and most poor fools are starving to death”.

You could at least try an appetizer.

 

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Mantua – At the last meeting of the Crestwood School Board, Principal Cindy Ducca introduced two new teacher recently hired to the district: Miss Amanda Marlow, who will teach kindergarten, and Miss Tessa Mannarino, who will teach first grade. Next, Middle School Principal Julie Schmidt introduced new hire Dave Verhotz, whose focus will be on science. Lastly, High School Principal Dave McMahon introduced several new staff hires, starting with CHS alumna Jessica Mazanetz, recently added to the roster, covering AP US History and AP Government. In addition, Mr. McMahon congratulated Erin Miller, the new Choir Director, and welcomed Assistant Principal Craig Boles. Mr. Boles joins Crestwood after completing his internship in Administration at Waterloo, where he taught health and physical education. In addition, he is a former football coach. Lastly, Superintendent Dave Toth welcomed back former retirees Kristy Jones and Betty Minor, who will be returning to the Crestwood District this fall.

In addition, Mr. Toth shared that during the summer, the Technology team has installed chrome book computer labs at the Primary, Intermediate and Middle Schools, and has added 16 more wireless access points at locations throughout the high school. In addition, he shared that the Ohio Department of Education has changed the requirements for graduating seniors. While the number of credits required for graduation remains the same (4 units each of English & Math, 3 units each of Science & Social Studies, ½ unit each of Health & Physical Education, and 5 electives), new tests and an exit exam will be implemented, as well as a points system, details of which will be forthcoming. These new requirements will take effect for the class of 2018.

In other news, Transportation Manager Bill Andexler announced that two new buses were purchased for the District, and will be in service for the coming school year. In addition, parking lots district-wide have been sealed and patched in preparation for the coming school year.

This Sunday, August 24th, from 5-8pm, Crestwood Schools will hold Community Day at Crestwood High School. Come for an evening of family fun, including bouncy houses, magic, balloon twisting and face painting. A pep rally will begin at 7pm. In addition, the fire and police departments will give tours of a fire truck and police car, and local organizations will be on hand to share community information. Please bring extra school supplies and new or gently used backpacks to “Stuff the Bus” for less fortunate families in the community.

Lastly, Open House is on Monday, August 25th — Crestwood Primary and Intermediate Schools will be open from 5 – 7 pm, while the Middle and High Schools will be open from 6 – 8 pm. All Students’ begin the 2014-2015 school year on Tuesday, August 26th.

The next regularly scheduled School Board meeting will be held on Wednesday, September 3rd in the CHS Library at 7 pm.

 

The James A. Garfield Local School District has got a TON of things—programs, activities, competitions, etc.—coming up.  Here’s a quick look; check the district website for more info or watch for stories in The Villager.

8/20—the Elementary School addition is to be finished – Frantic activity

8/21—the Steering committee tours the facility –   Frantic activity

8/23—the State Superintendent inspects the facility – Frantic activity

8/25—Faculty and staff arrive to gird up their loins for the coming year – Frantic activity

8/26—Students(grades 1-12) return, full of p&v and potential  – Frantic activity

8/28—Kindergarteners enter, wide-eyed and wondering

9/1—Labor Day, no school  – Deep breath

9/15—Waiver Day, no school for students, teachers pause to reconnoiter

9/16—Onward and Upward!

9/20—Saturday, 10:00a.m. Official ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new James A. Garfield Intermediate School, with various IMPORTANT PERSONS (That would be the Garfield public…and officials of all sorts) in attendance.  Garfield Alumni Banquet opens at 5:00p.m.  for meet-n-greet, 6:30 p.m.for dinner (Reservations due by September 1).

And that’s not even counting the additions and corrections to the athletic facility—new fencing , new goal posts, etc.—and the BIG GAME with the Harlem Ambassadors vs the Garrettsville Inspectors (Garfield alumni) on the basketball court on October 25 to support continuing improvements on Main Street & the athletic field.

Stay tuned.  Get involved.

 

back-to-school-kids

Find tons of great school spirit wear, and Garrettsville apparel at the Villager Emporium (8088 Main Street, Garrettsville)

*** Denotes Bus Route Changes for 2014-2015

*** Bus #1 Middle / High AM  

Driver – Jama Peterson

6:35 Leave garageRight on S.R. 88, Right on S.R. 303, Right on Asbury

Left on Streeter

Right on Limeridge

Left on Schustrich, Left on Vaughn, Left on Goodell

Right on Limeridge, Right on Streeter

Turn around at barn

Right on Limeridge

Left on S.R. 303

Left on S.R. 700

Left into Blackbrook Trailer Park

Left on 700

Right on Hankee, R onto to Village Dr.

Back to School

 

Bus #1  ELEMENTARY AM 

8:10 1ST PICK UPFrom Ravenna, Left on 88 – 303- 88, Left on Nichols

Left on Hankee, Left on 700

Right on 303, Right on Asbury

R on Streeter, L on Stamm

R on Hankee

Right on 700, Right into Blackbrook Trailer Park

Pick up @ mailbox

L on 700, R on Hankee/Freedom St.

Right on White St.

R on 88, Back to school

 

*** Bus #2 Middle / High AM  

Driver – Dreama Adkins

6:30 Leave garageLeft on 88, R Liberty St.

Left on Windham St. (82)

Right on Water

Left on Liberty, Left on Park

Right on Maple, Right on Center

Right on Knowlton, Left on Paul St, Left on Sophia

Left on Center

Right on Garfield Drive

Right on Center

Right on High

Right on Maple

Right on North Street(88)

Right onto  Meadow Run, Right onto Clover Lane

Right on Meadow Run

Left on North Street (88)./corner of Harris

Back to High School

 

Bus #2 Elementary AM

8:00 Leave garageLeft on S.R. 88, R on Liberty, Left on 82

R on Water

Left on Liberty,Left on Center

Right on High

Cross Maple

Right on Main, Right on North (88)

Right on Meadow Run, Right on Clover

Right onto Meadow Run

Left onto North, Pick up on Corner of Wolff

Left on Elm Street

Right on Forest

Right onto State Street

Go through light , Left on Center St.

Group Stop

Right on Liberty, Right on Park

At Corner Group Stop

Right on Maple, Left on Center

Straight on 82, Right on Freedom

Left on 88

Back to Elementary School

 

Bus #6 Middle / High AM  

Driver – Beverly Girdler

6:40am Leave garageRight on 88, Left on Nichols, Cross over 303

Turn around at Vair, Back down Nichols,R on Smalley

Left on Slagle

Cross over 303

R on Gotham

R on Stanley

R on 303

R on Nichols, If Stephanie called to ride THEN cross over 88, if not riding then turn R on 88

R on Anderson, L on 88

Back to School

 

BUS #6  ELEMENTARY AM

7:45am Leave garageRight on 88, cross over 303 to Nichols

Left on Nichols

Turn around at Vair, Back down Nichols

Right on Smalley

Left on Slagle

Cross over 303

Right on Gotham

Right On Stanley

Right on SR 303

Right on S.R. 88

BACK TO SCHOOL

 

*** Bus #7 Middle / High AM  

Driver Helene Christopher

6:25am Leave garageL on 88, R on Freedom, L on 82, R on Center,L on W/P,  R on 305 E

Left on 282

R Into Nelson Trailer Park

Right on 282

R on Bancroft

Cross 422, Bancroft /Chalker

Left on Reynolds Rd

Left on Hobart

R on 422, U turn @Reynolds, down 422

R on Fenstemaker

Right on 305

Go around Circle, Continue on 305 W

Left on Brosius

Right on Center St, L on 82, R on Freedom St.-Pick up

Left on 88,

Back to School

 

BUS #7 ELEMENTARY AM

7:45am Leave garageLeft on 88, Right on Liberty,

Left into Eagle Creek

Turn around then pick up

Left onto Liberty, Left on Silica St.

Left on Brosius, Right on Center

Left on Parkman, 1/4 around circle, Right on 305(E)

Right on Bloom

Right on Knowlton

Left on Center

Right on Garfield Dr.

Merge to the Right.

Right on Center St.

Right on Maple, Left on South St., Right on Zupancic

Right on S.R. 88, Straight onto Hewins- by Roller Hutt

Right on 88

Back to School

 

Bus #8 Middle / High AM  

Driver Pattie Avenmarg

6:42am Leave garageRight on 88, R on 303, L on 88, Left on Freedom Rd.

Right on Vair Rd.

Right on King

Left on 88

Turn Left into Hales 2nd drive, turn around back, turn right onto rt 88, go around back, then Right on 88

Left  on Limeridge, Left on Wygle Road, turn around, go back down Wygle

Turn around at drive on right past corn field

L on Limeridge

Turn around at last drive, Left before S.R. 303, garage in rear

Left on 88

Right on 303, Right on Asbury

Left onto 88

Right on 303

Left on 88

Back  to School

 

BUS #8 ELEMENTARY AM

7:45am Leave garageRight on 88, Right on 303, Left on 88

Left on Freedom Road

Right on Vair Road

Right on King

Left on 88

Turn around in Hales 2nd drive,

Left  on Limeridge, Left on Wygle Road, turn around, go back down Wygle

Turn around at drive on right past corn field

Left on Limeridge

Right on 303, Right on Asbury

Left on 88

Left on 700, Right into Freedom Park- by recyling

Left on 88/303,

Left on 88, Left on Nichols, Right on Anderson

Left on 88

Back to School

 

*** Bus #9 Middle / High AM  

Driver – Shelly Pemberton

6:30am Leave garageLeft on 88, Right on Liberty, Right on Center, Right on Brosius

Right on Riverview

Right on Brosius, Left on Pierce, R on Hopkins

L on WP, R on Pierce

Right on Newell Ledge

Left on Silica Sand, Go to Colton Rd, Turn around, Left on Silica Sand

R on WIndham Parkman

Go Around Circle, at Y stay Right,

L on Hopkins

R on Pierce

Left on Brosius

Right on 82,

L on on Liberty

Left on 88, Back to School

 

Bus #9 Elementary AM

7:45am Leave garageLeft on 88, Right on Liberty, Right on Center, Right on Brosius

Right on Riverview

Right on Brosius

Right on Hopkins

Right Pierce, Right on Newell Ledge, Left onSilica Sand, Go to Colton Rd, turn around, Left on Silica Sand

Right on Win/Parkman- Pick up all the way to the Circle

At Nelson Circle, Take the Y to the RIght, Center Rd-Left on Hopkins

Right on Pierce

Left on Brosius

Right on 82

Left on Liberty, Left on 88, Back to school

 

*** Bus #10 Middle / High AM  

Driver – Danny Deakins

6:35 Leave garageLeft on 88, Right on Freedom, Left on 82, Right on Center, Right on Knowlton, Right on Parkman, Left on Collins.

Left on Bloom

Right on 305, Right on Kyle

Left on Knowlton

Right on Shanks-Down

Turn around, go back down  12486Shanks-Down

Left on Knowlton

Straight on Nicholson

Left on 305, Left on Kyle

Right on Knowlton

Right on Windham Parkman Road, go around circle to Nelson Parkman

Left on Pritchard

Left on Prentiss

Cross over Ely, turn around at Turos

Left on Ely, Left on Brosius

Right on 305, Left on 88, Back to School

 

Bus 10 ELEMENTARY AM

7:42 Leave garageLeft on 88, Right on Freedom St., Left on 82, Right on Center, Right on Knowlton, Right on Win/Parkman, Left on Collins, Left on Bloom

Right on Knowlton

Turn right to stay on Knowlton

Right on Shanks-Down

Turn around 2486 Shanks-Down

Left on Knowlton

Go straight on Knowlton,Turns into Nicholson

Right on 305, Left on Fenstemaker

Left on Kennedy Ledge

Left on 282

Left on 305,Right on Kyle

Right on Knowlton

Left on Center, Right on Maple, Left on 88, Right on Freedom

Left onto Village Drive/Vanderslice

Corner of Village/Vanderslice

Right on Freedom, Right on White,Right on 88

Stop at JFK- AM ONLY

 

Bus #12 ELEMENTARY AM 

7:50am Leave garageL on S.R. 88, Right on Freedom St., Left on Windham St., Right on Center St., Left on Brosius

Cross Over 305

Right on Ely

Right on Prentiss

Go to Turos Farm, Turn Around, Back down Prentiss

Cross on Ely

Right on Pritchard

Turn Left on Nelson Parkman Rd. Turn around

Turn Right on Nelson Parkman Road

Right on 305

Right on Mills

Left on 88, Left on 82, Right on Liberty, Right on 88

Right on South Park Ave.

Turn around at next Road

Left on 88, Back to School

 

*** Bus #17 Middle / High AM  

Driver – Debbie Ellison

6:35am Leave garageL on 88, L on State/ 82

Go to turn around at top of hill- A-frame house pick up

Left on Wheeler Rd.

R on Shawnee Trail

Right on Wheeler Rd.

Right on Wrenwood

Right on Wheeler Rd., Right on S.R. 305,

Left on 88, Right on Mills

Right on 305

Right on 88

Back into North Coast Energy on R, Back down 88

Right on Norton,

RIght on Mumford

Left on Grove, Left on Udall

L on Norton

Right on Mumford

Right onto S.R. 88

GROUP STOP French/South St. (88)

Left on Hewins

Right on 88, Back to school

 

BUS #17 ELEMENTARY AM

7:50am Leave garageLeft on 88, Left on 82

Go to turn around at top of hill, go back down 82

L on Wheeler

R on Wrenwood

R on Wheeler, R on S.R. 305

Left on S.R. 88

ON Right- Back into North Coast Energy drive- Back down S.R. 88(South)

Right on Norton

R on Mumford

After Pick up

Right onto S.R. 88

Corner of French Street to South Street

Right on Crestwood

Right on 88-JFK

Back to Elementary School

 

*** Bus #18 Middle / High AM  

Driver – Rose Broadwater

6:40am Leave garageLeft on 88, Left on White, Left on Hankee/Freedom, Left on Nichols

Right on S.R.88, Right on S.R. 303, Right on S.R. 700

Right on Streeter

Turn around in Nottingham’s driveway, go back left on Streeter, Cross 700

Right on Stamm

Left on Hankee, Left on Asbury

Left on Streeter

Left on Stamm, Right on Hankee

Cross over 700, Hankee/Freedom

Right on S.R.88

Back to School

 

BUS #18 ELEMENTARY  AM

7:40am Leave garageLeft on S.R. 88, Left on Freedom St., Left on Nichols

Right on 88, Right on 303

Right on Limeridge

Right on Vaughn, Right on Schustrich, Right on Limeridge

Left on Goodell

Left on Goodell, Left on Limeridge, Right on Streeter

Turn around @ barn, Right on Streeter,

Cross Limeridge

Cross Asbury

Cross over 700

Left on Nichols Rd.

Right on Hankee/Freedom St.

 

Bus #25 Elementary AM

Driver – Debbie Woodrum

7:30am Leave garageL on 88, R on Freedom, L on Windham St., R on Center,R on 305 E.

Left on 282

Back into Prichard, Back down 282

Left on Bancroft

Right on 422. U-turn at bottom of hill, Continue on 422

Right on Bancroft/Chalker

Left Reynolds Rd.

Left on Hobart

Right on 422, U-turn on 422 at Reynolds,

Right on Fenstemaker

Right on S.R. 305

Right on 282, Right into Nelson Trailer Park

Turn around at mailboxes, Pick up at Pavilion

Left on 282, Right on 305

Right on Parkman, Right on Center, Back to School

14-986-Site-Traffic-Plan

The opening of school at James A. Garfield will bring many new things this year.  A new 17,500 square foot addition will welcome our fifth and sixth grade students and staff. All students in grades 7-12 will have new laptops. The construction of the new addition will bring a new traffic pattern for parents during pickup and dropoff times.  This map should help provide some direction for everyone as you return to school on August 26. We will also have staff members at specific areas the first week back to assist everyone with these new traffic patterns.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the district office at 330.527.4336.

 

Alie2

Newton Falls – Summer may be almost over, which means classes are about to start up again for the area’s youngsters (and college co-eds too!) but for one local student the learning didn’t stop just because the school bell rang signaling warm weather had arrived. Alie Orr, a soon-to-be ninth grader at Newton Falls High School, had the opportunity to spend part of her summer vacation attending a gathering of future leaders in Columbus. Youth from all over the United States converged upon our state capital for a weekend of workshops, projects, teambuilding and networking, hoping to return to their respective regions a little bit more talented, a smidge wiser and perhaps even with a few new friends on facebook.

Once Alie received her acceptance letter to the event, the National Young Leaders State Conference, thanks to a nomination by her seventh grade English teacher, Mrs. Clay, she started to fulfill the program’s curriculum requirements by producing a creative newsletter-type magazine cover about someone she admired (she picked her mom) and considered her goals and what she hoped to acquire from her time there.

For her part, Kristy Orr, Alie’s mom, had a big wish for her daughter’s attendance at the conference: to gain more confidence.

During the whirlwind weekend, students kept a special journal answering prompts in the book that required them to think deeply on different topics and to explore potentially new areas of discussion including conversations they would have in class. One workshop invited the students to imaginarily plan a community service project (Alie planned a fundraiser concert for autism awareness) while another put the participants in the spotlight, engaging them as discussion leaders, which helped polish their skills and become better public speakers. Though the service project Alie planned in class is only imaginary right now, she has organized a real one taking place this weekend: a bake sale to help the homeless in our local community, set up during the City Wide Yard Sale (August 15, 16 and 17).

Before she temporarily left the small town of Newton Falls for the big city of Columbus, one of Alie’s own goals was to talk more and make new friends and all around “to better myself,” she said. Sorted into themed teams of other kids her age from various parts of the country (the 8th grader sets were named after rivers), Alie as part of the “Amazons” spent the conference getting to know a diverse group of students and honed her social skills as well as her academic abilities.

She mentioned that the experience has indeed helped her ask questions more and be more engaged with those around her. “I spent four days with complete strangers and walked out with a bunch of phone numbers,” she said with a smile.

If there’s one thing this bright young lady hopes people will know about her it’s that there’s more than meets the eye and she may be quiet but that doesn’t mean she’s shy. “I’m not just a bookworm,” she explained. “I’m fun to be around and I pick and choose my friends wisely.”

So did Kristy’s wish for her daughter come true?

“I am most proud of her for finding herself,” Kristy said. “This past year was a difficult year for her and I’m proud of her for staying true to who she is, that she owns who she is. Embrace your weirdness!” And the confidence? Kristy mentioned that she has indeed seen a higher level of confidence in Alie. “I’ve noticed that difference ever since,” she said.

So what’s around the corner for this year? In addition to continuing her already full schedule of interests including playing snare drum in the marching band and serving as defender on the soccer team, Alie would like to study drama, journalism and photography in the upcoming school year as well. And if that isn’t enough to juggle, Alie is looking forward to being the first freshman at Newton Falls to take college classes at Kent Trumbull. As she doesn’t have a high school GPA yet which is a requirement for taking courses, this first semester will be strictly high school classes to officially earn that status. Then she will incorporate the higher learning one class at a time, to which she states there’s only one problem: her small height in comparison to all the older college students. “I’ll just have to wear high heels to look taller,” she quipped.

And for after she officially graduates from high school, well, she’s thought that out too. Although mom Kristy attended Kent State University and dad Ron is a Hiram College alumnus, Alie has her sights set on Ohio State with plans to study veterinary medicine. Alie’s love for animals is shown in the two cats and one dog that keep her entertained at home and caring for them is a good start for her intended career.

It appears that with a little bit more planning, a smidge of ambition and perhaps even a touch of luck, Amazon Alie will be achieving amazing accomplishments!http://www.envisionexperience.com/explore-our-programs/national-young-leaders-state-conference?region=ohio – what-to-expect

 

Photo courtesy The Harlem Ambassadors

Photo courtesy The Harlem Ambassadors

Garrettsville - The fun begins at 7:00 PM on October 25th (doors open 40 minutes before tip-off), when the internationally acclaimed Harlem Ambassadors take on the Garrettsville Inspectors (Garfield High School Alumni) in a fun-filled, family-friendly evening of basketball showmanship featuring high-flying slam dunks, ball-handling tricks, and hilarious comedy routines at Garfield High School Gymnasium.

Bring the whole family to this event and experience laugh-out-loud comedy basketball for a good cause. There will be an opportunity to win an autographed basketball, purchase Harlem Ambassadors souvenirs, meet the Harlem Ambassadors during a free post-game autograph session, and snacks and beverages will be available for purchase.

A limited number of tickets are available for this event, which benefits the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce’s  #GarrettsvilleStrong fund, and Phase II of the James A. Garfield Stadium Improvement Project.

Advance tickets go on sale Monday, August 18th and may be purchased online at garrettsvillearea.com/tix or at one of many area businesses including: The Villager (8088 Main St); Charles Auto Family (10851 North St); Miller’s Family Restaurant (8045 State St); Garrettsville DQ Grill & Chill (8013 State St); and the James A Garfield School offices when school returns.

Ticket prices are as follows: Adults – $10; Students (12 & Under) – $7; Seniors – $7; Family 4 Pack (4 Tickets & 2 Bags of Popcorn) – $30. Call 330-527-5761 for ticket information.

Stay up to date by visiting www.garrettsvillearea.com/basketball or by joining the event on Facebook.

Learn more about the Harlem Ambassadors at www.harlemambassadors.com

This event has been brought to you by the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Garfield All Sports Boosters.

Sponsorship Opportunities for this event are available. Call 330-527-5761 to learn more!

 

Garrettsville – The $5M Straight A Grant from the state provided the James A. Garfield Schools with some exceptional opportunities.  With these exceptional opportunities came exceptional challenges. To date, I am happy to report that these challenges have been met. The project is on time and under budget.

Regardless of the obstacles, the addition is on schedule to open for students on August 26.  Here are the latest developments on each component of the grant.

Construction

Our Design/Builder, Hammond Construction, and all of the subcontractors have worked tirelessly to ensure that we receive our building on time.  More importantly,  they are delivering this community a building of excellent quality.

We are also proud to have local contractors working on the project.  Most notably are our electricians, Scotchman Electric, and our painters, Doug Seaman Decorating.

The addition will include 8 classrooms, 2 state-of- the-art science labs, 2 special education classrooms and a professional development center.  The professional development space will comfortably seat 120 adults and contain digital projection equipment for presentations or trainings. While this space will offer a flexible instructional space for students, the district will make this space available to the public for meetings. The project also includes a renovation to the office area, creating a more functional space as well as a secure entrance for visitors and a dual serving line in the cafeteria.

Last February, a “Campus of Excellence Oversight Committee” was established to oversee all aspects of the project.  Over 40 individuals from the community have been actively involved making decisions about the addition.  This group consisted of parents, business owners, community members and school employees.  They have met throughout the project and provided the input necessary to construct a building we can all be proud of for the next 50 years.

While our students will be in the building on August 26, we will be planning an official ribbon cutting ceremony for late September or early October.

Finally, through careful selection of contractors and good planning, the project is coming in under budget. Savings will be used to invest in three areas.  Efficiency items such as HVAC controls and energy efficient windows have been purchased and will save taxpayer money over time.  Security items such as exterior cameras and keypad entry doors will provide for student safety. Instructional upgrades include an enhanced wireless network and 210 laptops on carts for student to use in grades K-6.

Technology

Laptops for staff have been distributed and training is scheduled for next week. Between August 12 and the start of school over 650 laptops will be distributed to students in grades 7-12 (see page 8 for details).  The wireless infrastructure has been upgraded on the entire campus and is ready to support a new era of 21st Century learning.

Partnerships

The Portage County Educational Service Center (ESC) and the Greater Cleveland YMCA are moving forward with their plans to bring their services to the community. The YMCA has brought youth soccer and flag football to our community and already has over sixty students signed up to participate.  The ESC will open two preschool classrooms in the retiring Intermediate School this fall.

With the construction project, technology initiatives and new partnerships developing as planned and on schedule, we have a great deal to celebrate.  The pride of our community continues to drive us towards excellence. Go G-Men!

 

inspector-crestGarrettsville – Technology is today’s pencil. It is becoming an integral part of teaching and learning, and thanks to the $5 Million Straight A Grant, this year every James A. Garfield Student in grades 7-12 will be receiving an HP Chromebook. The devices are being provided to students as learning tools that will allow them to create, collaborate, communicate and engage in critical thinking activities.

Dates have been scheduled for parents to come in with their children to receive their laptops over the coming weeks. Our goal is to distribute all laptops before the first day of school on August 26.

Insurance can be purchased for the device for $23 annually that will cover theft, drops, spills or natural disaster. Families may opt out of the insurance and assume responsibility for the replacement cost ($253) of the device.  Checks should be made payable to the James A. Garfield Local Schools. Parents wishing to purchase insurance for their child’s device should bring their payment to their scheduled pickup time.

 

Pickup times will be as follows:

 

Tuesday, August 12 (6pm) – Seniors

Wednesday, August 13 (6pm) – Juniors

Thursday, August 14 (6pm) – Sophomores

 

Tuesday, August 19 (6pm) – Freshmen

Wednesday, August 20 (6pm) – 8th Grade

Thursday, August 21 (6pm) – 7th Grade

 

Friday, August 22 (6pm) – Makeup Day (anyone who missed their date)

Monday, August 25 (7pm) – Makeup Day (anyone who missed their date)

 

Laptops will be distributed in the Iva Walker Auditorium. A brief presentation for parents and students will follow to cover expectations and procedures for the devices.

Questions can be direct to Jen Mulhern at 330.527.2151.

 

If you attended James A. Garfield (at any point), or Freedom, Nelson or Garrettsville Schools prior to the 1951 consolidation…. you are! JAG Alumni are cordially invited to the James A. Garfield Alumni Banquet which will be held on September 20, 2014 at JamesA. Garfield Elementary School. The banquet is a wonderful opportunity to reacquaint with past classmates, enjoy a delicious meal and entertainment from the award-winning James A. Garfield Band. Please contact Helen Louise Bouts at 330-309-2734 to make your reservation. Your reservation can be mailed to: James A. Garfield Alumni Banquet, P.O. Box 93, Garrettsville, OH 44231. The cost is $18 per person. Please include the name and year of the alumni attending and the name(s) of any guests. The reservation deadline is September 1, 2014.

 

gmen-garfield-localGarrettsville – One more meeting of the Campus of Excellence Oversight Committee on August 21 (D-Day plus one), the day AFTER the Garfield Elementary School Addition and Campus Enhancement project is scheduled for completion.

The roof is on.  The windows are nearly all in.  The door frames are ready for installation.  Despite the vicissitudes encountered in any construction project with this kind of timeline and this kind of retrofitting involved, the light is on at the end of the tunnel. It’s coming down to the wire and all systems are GO!

Savings were realized in the bidding process and have been re-invested in upgrades throughout the James A. Garfield campus, for all buildings.  This includes more efficient windows, security upgrades (also utilizing funds raised initially by Dee Synnestvedt for parking lot security cameras), digital signage for the high school and elementary school campus—5’x8’, wireless, , kitchen  improvements, carpeting in the new elementary band room, furniture upgrades…the whole shootin’ match…looking good.

So when would you like to hold the official ribbon-cutting ceremony?  In September some time?  Before a home football game?  On my birthday?  Whatever your suggestion, get it to a committee member or to the district office ASAP and, in any case, plan to mark your calendar and be there because heaven only knows how many dignitaries will arrive to see this amazing accomplishment marked by the community and all of the folks who made it possible.

And don’t forget that your YMCA is also reaching out to the community for input concerning the types of programs you would like to see offered out of the Park Avenue building.  They will soon begin having one-day-a-week open hours for registration leading to participation in fall programs.  Ditto for the PCESC which will be operating a pre-school program out of that building.  The YMCA contact person is Chris Scheuer; his number is 914-443-0043 and he’d like to hear about your interest in programs for all ages, K through Old-Enough-to-Know-Better.  Let him know what you’re interested in.

We’re ALL interested in this.

One to go!

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Mantua – At the July meeting of the Crestwood School Board, the Board approved a contract with Virtual Community School (VCS), an online school based in Ohio. Through enrollment in the special program, families who choose online schooling for their students would be supplied with a computer, printer and online instruction aligned with State and common core standards through VCS. VCS would monitor and report students progress back to Crestwood, ensuring that the students meet the appropriate academic requirements.

The agreement is valid for the 2014-2015 academic school year, and will offer online and homeschool students within the Crestwood School District to continue with online instruction while becoming a Crestwood District student. As such, the student would be eligible to participate in the District’s extracurricular activities, and the District would retain some of the per-student instruction funds from State and Federal sources. According to Superintendent David Toth, the ultimate goal, at some point in the future, would be to provide such a program using Crestwood teachers as instructors, an initiative that is part of the current strategic plan.

In other news, the Board approved contracts for the 2014 – 2015 school year with Advanced Rehabilitation, Portage Physical Therapists, and the Stark/Portage Area Computer Consortium (SPARCC) for Internet services. In addition, the Board authorized the Superintendent to implement a Continuous Improvement Plan, based on a summary of findings from this Spring’s Strategic Planning Sessions for the District.

Later, Superintendent Toth and the School Board congratulated Mr. Arden Sommers on his resignation/return to retirement, thanking him for his years of service to the District. Mr. Sommers acknowledged, “It’s been a privilege.” Filling Mr. Sommers position as Principal of Crestwood High School will be Dave McMahon, former Assistant Principal at the High School.

Lastly, the Board set a date for a public hearing on Monday, August 4th at 6:45 pm, to rehire a number of Crestwood retirees. This meeting will be held in the High School Library. The regularly scheduled Board meeting will start immediately following, at 7 pm.

 

Shhhhhhhhh

(Trying to avoid jinxing the project.)

Photo: Denise Bly, Contributing Reporter

Photo: Denise Bly, Contributing Reporter

The latest report on the big school construction project adding Garfield Intermediate onto Garfield Elementary and locating all of the James A. Garfield Local School District buildings on a unified campus, thus saving time AND money in the educational process…the report is that things seem to be holding pretty well to schedule and looking like the—extremely tight–deadlines will be met.

The latest update, delivered June 19 in a presentation and walk-through to an interested and inquisitive group disclosed the various contracts and contractors involved, from sitework and concrete through structural steel, lockers, HVAC, building electric(Scotchman Electric),painting and wall covering(Doug Seaman Decorating), technology and paving.  Not to mention kitchen equipment, carpentry, flooring and plumbing.  Every one of these contracts was bid out and issued keeping both the cost and the time constraints in mind.  The intricacies of scope in such construction are quite amazing, involving the “breathability” of a building combined with    building efficiency, updating of the utility functions for the entire campus,  the element of “Seek and ye shall find,” in discovering an Insinkerator in the bus garage attic, brick types and so much more.

So far….  Looking good.

The weather has had its usual effects and, no doubt, will continue to do the same but once the roof, and the drainage thereof, goes on, it’ll be, “Bessie, bar the doors” and full speed ahead.

Also at the meeting was “The Y Guy” who complemented the entire community on the excellent condition of the Park Avenue building, indicative of the level of use and maintenance given priority over the years.  He indicated that the menu of services and activities to be offered out of the headquarters there will be developed over time, beginning with youth sports and expanding to adult programs and leagues, as needed.  This will be a methodical, step-by-step process, ensuring quality and demand, with high standards set for supervision and equipment and program design.  He mentioned the YMCA’s association with the Junior Cavaliers program and Adventure Guides as being part of the long-range outlook for sponsored activities.  Kim Curry, formerly part of the local soccer organization, will be the part-time co-ordinator for this new enterprise.

The Portage County ESC will be operating a community pre-school in their portion of the building.  All systems are GO.

Shhhhhh.  It’s going to happen.

zimmerman-garfield-home-hiram-college

Hiram – In 1863, when James A. Garfield bought the home on Hinsdale Road, Hiram College was just thirteen years old.  Garfield had just begun serving in Congress when he and his wife, Lucretia, moved in. Garfield was Principal of the institution, the equivalent of College President. The couple sold the home to Burke A. Hinsdale, who served as the first permanent president of Hiram College. In 1882, Hinsdale eventually sold the home to Phebe Boynton Clapp, Garfield’s cousin, and the house has been in the family for three generations.  That legacy ended with the recent passing of long-time Hiram resident Phebe Zimmerman.

It was Phebe’s great-grandmother Phebe Boynton Clapp, who established the family’s Hiram legacy. Like her cousin, James A Garfield, Clapp was also a student at the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute, which became Hiram College. Garfield returned to Hiram as college president, and then moved on to higher offices. Phebe Boynton Clapp also returned to Hiram. She held the position of Lady Principal, the equivalent to Dean of Women. Unlike her cousin, however, she stayed on in Hiram, and in 1883, she purchased the Garfield family home on Hinsdale.

The home remained in the family, and was used as a summer residence. In 1946, Phebe and John Zimmerman came to the house in Hiram temporarily, after John returned from service in WWII. But like her great-grandmother before her, Zimmerman stayed on. With her family, she lovingly maintained the home.  In 2013, however, Phebe Zimmerman sold the home to Hiram College, with an understanding that she would reside there as long as she chose to do so. In announcing the sale she stated “I am happy that the house will be preserved and will be used for a purpose that honors its history.”

By terms of the sale the house will be called the Garfield Robbins Zimmerman House, to reflect the history of those who owned it. The home will house the offices for the Garfield Institute for Public Leadership, which instructs students in public service. Eventually, it will serve as a venue for discussions and guest speakers and a mini-museum showcasing the legacy left by James Garfield.

 

Rootstown - As a result of its ongoing success in developing innovative and progressive learning opportunities for students, Bio-Med Science Academy, a year-round public STEM+M high school located on the campus of Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), has been selected by the Ohio STEM Learning Network to serve as one of its regional STEM training center sites.

The Ohio STEM Learning Network training centers were developed to meet the growing demand for STEM professional development and provide educators at every school with the support they need to implement effective STEM education strategies. Each training center site highlights the strengths of the STEM schools in that region, allowing educators to focus on proven and effective STEM education and learning methodologies. Trainings cover topics like problem- and project-based learning, intersessions, student-led conferences, technology integration, and mastery learning.

“From the start, Bio-Med’s team has been dedicated to serving as a resource for the region. That focus on a ‘big footprint’ is one of the reasons we have been so excited to see the school grow,” said Dustin Pyles, director of operations for Ohio STEM Learning Network. “Bio-Med’s selection as a training center recognizes the school’s success at preparing students and its value as a demonstration site of innovative teaching and learning. The number of new and emerging STEM schools and programs in Ohio has doubled since Bio-Med first opened, and the need for these services has never been higher.”

The Ohio STEM Learning Network is supported and managed by BattelleEd, a nonprofit venture of Battelle Memorial Institute, as the state’s official public-private STEM education partner. Bio-Med Science Academy is among eight schools within the Ohio STEM Learning Network to currently serve as regional training center sites.

As a training center site, Bio-Med Science Academy will offer training and consultation to teachers all across Ohio in identified areas of expertise, including Google Apps for educators, literacy design collaborative, math design collaborative, restorative practices, and engineering concepts.

“As a relatively young STEM school, we are honored by our selection as one of the Ohio STEM Learning Network’s regional training center sites,” said Stephanie Lammlein, director of the Academy. “We have certainly benefitted from the insights of our peers as we have developed our own best practices, and it is in that spirit we look forward to sharing our successful instruction techniques with our colleagues from around the state.”

Bio-Med Science Academy is a tuition-free public STEM+M (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Medicine) high school that is open to any student in Ohio but was developed to serve students primarily from rural communities in Portage County and other surrounding counties. The Academy offers an innovative and progressive learning environment that cultivates academic excellence and rigor in the STEM+M disciplines while nurturing creativity, inventiveness and community in its students.

A year-round high school, the Academy’s course themes are developed based on current trends in science and medicine as well as the research and education being conducted at NEOMED. The Academy also develops educational experiences around community health and the environment in both urban and rural communities. For more information on the Academy or to fill out an application for the waitlist, please visit www.biomedscienceacademy.org or call 330.325.6186.

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Mantua – At the June meeting of the Crestwood School Board, District Technology Supervisor Jeff Woolard was asked to give a presentation to the Board sharing his team’s achievements this year, and the projects they’re looking to implement within the District over the coming months. With the help of his team, District Network Technicians Carl Zeleznik and Nicholas Karman, Woolard shared that the group has added 65 access points, took ownership of the District’s domain (crestwoodschools.org) and is in the process of implementing Google Cloud platform throughout the District. The current and ongoing advances will help provide platform reliability, increased storage capacity and better online project collaboration, “even on snow days,” joked Woolard. As an added bonus, many Portage and Stark County school districts have already chosen, or are migrating to Google. The Stark-Portage Area Computer Consortium (SPARCC) is able to provide technical support for Google, as well. SPARCC, of which Crestwood is a member, also serves school districts in Stark, Portage and Carroll counties.

As a part of his group’s three-year plan, Google chromebooks will used throughout Schools in the District. During the current school year, a new mobile cart, complete with 30 laptop computers, has been tested in the Intermediate Building, with positive results. The purchase of this cart was made possible through an anonymous donation. Future District plans include providing laptops on similar carts, which include charging stations, for use throughout the District. These new laptops will be the primary vehicle used in online standardized testing. In addition, the District’s web site is in the process of being redesigned, and will be launched over the summer.

In her Sports Report, Board Member Debra Soltisz reported that the following students received All-PTC Recognition: In Baseball, Gabe Surgeon was named to First Team, Josh Hampton and Matt Lyons were named to Second Team, and Jared Bailey and Ross Nielsen earned Honorable Mention. In Softball, Bailee Kodash earned First Team, while Reanna Szarka and Holly Hoffman earned Second Team status and Miranda Brothers and Taylor Chism earned Honorable Mention. In Boys Track, Jeremiah Fitzgerald and Jacob Ondash earned First Team. Austin Usher, George Lesnak, Craig Davis, John Kilbourne and Brendan Fannin were named to the Second Team, while Tyler Brady and Michael Picone earned Honorable Mention.

In Girls Track, Alania Nuti, Taylor Rector, Marissa Midgley, Lindsay Thut, Hayley Zigman and Abby Soltisz earned First Team. Lindsay Thut, Challis Roberts, Hayley Zigman, Kira Judd, Maddie Sorrick and Abby Soltisz earned Second Team and Carlie Cofojohn and Melissa Soltisz received Honorable Mention. Lastly, Justin Vaughan was named to First Team for Tennis while Andrew Shahan and Tyler Roth earned Honorable Mention.

In his Academic Report, Board Member Todd Monroe shared that the use of Blizzard Bags was successful, as was the fifth grade orientation at the Middle School. In addition, he reported that Crestwood Middle School Leadership students held their second annual walk to benefit Juvenile Diabetes. Over fifty students walked to raise funds totaling $1,069.71 for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. CMS Leadership advisor, Kristen Tekavec, shared, “It’s so amazing to have such awesome students and staff raise funds for such a worthy cause.”

In her Maplewood Update, Board Member Bonnie Lovejoy reported that construction had begun on the Animal Science facility. The program will include training for employment opportunities including vet assistant, grooming, kennel, doggie daycare and pet shop industries.

This meeting was recorded; the video can be viewed at crestwoodschools.org. The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Crestwood School Board will be held on Thursday, July 3rd at 7 pm in the CHS library.

 

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DeYoungHiram - This spring, Hiram-based advertising agency the Communications Factory used a little helium to help an area high school senior on her way to earning a higher education. Over its last eleven years in operation, the Factory has awarded a $1,000 scholarship every spring to a deserving northeastern Ohio high school senior to help them in pursuit of a college degree. This year, however, Plant Manager Brad Turner wanted to do things a little differently. Instead of waiting to attend the scholarship recipient’s Senior banquet, Turner chose to surprise this year’s winner, Ms. Allison DeYoung of Field High School in Uniontown, Ohio.

Unbeknown to DeYoung, Turner had worked with administrators at Field High School to stage a covert operation on a random day in May, during DeYoung’s English class. At intervals throughout the class period, some of DeYoung’s classmates entered the room, each handing her a single, shiny, red, star-shaped Mylar balloon. DeYoung sat mystified, surrounded by her equally puzzled classmates, as the excitement mounted with each new delivery. Within a few minutes, nine balloons floated above DeYoung’s desk. When the card attached to balloon number ten was delivered, the secret was revealed, to the amazement and delight of DeYoung and her classmates.

According to Brad Turner of the Communications Factory, the card read, “While balloons alone are a great way to boost your spirits, what’s inside of each of these will boost it even more. Congratulations, Allison. You’re the winner of the 2014 Communications Factory Scholarship. Pop each balloon and celebrate!”  As the words from the card began to sink in, DeYoung’s’s teacher handed her a pair of scissors and urged her to start popping the balloons. As she did so, she uttered, “Oh my goodness!” and “Oh my gosh!” many times over while she located each tightly rolled one-hundred-dollar bill, one per balloon, for a total of $1,000. Shortly thereafter, she called her mom to share the exciting news…and to ask her to please come pick up the money.

In a heartfelt note she later wrote to Turner, DeYoung expressed her gratitude. “Thank you so much for choosing me as the winner of this year’s scholarship. And especially thank you for the wonderful surprise in my English class! I have to say that I was not expecting that at all!” To see the event as it unfolded in the Field High School classroom, view the video at: facebook.com/communicationsfactory.

In April of 2015, the Factory will be awarding another scholarship to help another deserving student’s dreams take flight. Visit www.communicationsfactory.net for more information.

 

Chess

Garrettsville – Isabella Folio (right)  and Brody Swigonski (left) won their respective divisions for the annual Garfield 4th grade PTO chess tournament (pictured).  Congratulations to them both!  The tournament was held over their lunch break for several weeks, and they recently competed in the finals.

For the boys division, Brody Swigonski defeated Kodiak Brogan in the final match.  For the girls division, Isabella Folio defeated Addrianna Conway in the finals.

The tournament was sponsored by the Garfield PTO and the elementary school.  Students were invited to come during their lunch once a week and play chess, checkers, cards, or even just read a book.  Almost one hundred different students participated in the program.  Special thanks to the PTO, the fourth grade teachers, and principal Keri Dornack.

 

Garrettsville – Garfield High School graduate Simeon Brown of Garrettsville is the 2014 recipient of the President James A. Garfield Award.  The $1000 scholarship honors the values held  by James A. Garfield, who at age 26 became president of what would later be known as Hiram College and who later became president of the United States.  The scholarship is awarded on consideration of the student’s essay concerning  a value or belief reflected in the life of President Garfield and the student’s demonstrated scholarship and community or school  service. Mr. Brown intends to continue his education in the Conservatory of Music at Baldwin Wallace University  in Berea.

Mantua – The Rotary Club of Mantua would like to congratulate Crestwood high school junior Morgan Strenk.  Morgan is the winner of the prestigious Rotary Youth Leadership Award scholarship. This award will enable Morgan to participate at a camp held at Baldwin Wallace University from June 8-14, 2014.

Approximately 50 juniors from the northeast, Ohio area will participate at this camp.  The award is only given to juniors so they may use the leadership skills learned at camp for their senior year of high school.  The general unanimous comment from the students that have completed the camp is: “it was the best thing I have ever done in my life”.  We look forward the future accomplishments from this outstanding student.

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Ryan Louis Acker

Mikayla R. Ashba

Madison Claire Barber

McKenzie Marie Blau

Sasha Rose Brotman

Bianca Rae Brown

Lindsey Nicole Burnett

Courtney Karam Call

Cassandra Cameron

Tyler Alex Chapek

Cody Allen Charvat

Julie Anne Combs

Branden Matthew Conrad

MacKenzie Anne Cossick

Dominic Allan DeLuca

Julie Ann Dingman

Kaylee Ann Marie Evans

Kaitlyn Elena Freiling

Luke Anton Freiling

Joshua Michael Garrett

Mackenzie Elizabeth Gilliland

Max Franklin Gilliland

Breanna Marie Girolamo

Marc Alan Girolamo

Gage Kristopher Green

Jessica Cheyenne Hackett

Erica Rose Marie Harris

Brandon Donald Haycox

William Frederick Hess

Laura Marie Hinkle

Stephen James Horvath

Dakota James Kaschalk

Harley Henry Kelly

Charles Michael Kepich

Hunter Brooke Klarich

Edward Joseph Koziol

Jonathan Douglas Kreuz

Samuel John Kwasniewski

Amy Jane Lasco

Joseph S. Lencoski

Tia Marie Shoshanna Rose Maier

Timothy James Malkus

Lisa Michele Marcy

Keanu Anthony Samuel Martin

Megan Marie McCartney

Ian Loel McClellan

Caroline Marie Milano

Ryan James Miller

Nicholas Millet

Mike Thomas Molnar

Ian Matthew Moore

Alison Margaret Moss

Zachary Steven Motil

Peyton Elizabeth Neumore

Christian Hunter Pallagi

McKinley James Parker

Kathryn Elizabeth Paul

Kyle Andrew Pillar

Romolo Giuseppe Rabasi

Jonathon David Ramsey

Darren Keith Redd

Chelsea Nicole Reed

Olivia Lauren Roach

Priscilla Jessica Sandoval

Stephen Edwin Saurman

Dustin James Simmons

Ronald George Simpson

Steven Matthew Sitko

Branson Blaine Race Skidmore

Gabriela Mara Spangler

Devon Scott Stivers

Megan Thomas

Anthony Charles Tiber

Logan Davis Timmons

Katherine Rose Uterhark

Brandon James Vander Maas

Jason Anthony Voskion

Benjamin Alan Wiley

Joshua David Williamson

Gabriel Thomas Wilson

Emma Jane Yokules

Danielle Megan Young

 

chamber-scholarshipGarrettsville – On June 4th the Garrettsville Area Chamber held their annual Scholarship Luncheon at Cal’s Restaurant.  Each year the Chamber awards three scholarships to graduating Garfield High School seniors.

Pictured above are the 2014 recipients of the scholarships.  Amber Wenger (right) will be attending Kent State University to study Nursing; Trevor Chambers (left) will be pursuing a degree in Safety Management at Slippery Rock University; Laura Wilburn (center) will attend Youngstown State and NEOMED  where she will be working towards her medical degree.

Congratulations and best of luck to all!

 

6-1-14 Emma and Travis

Emma Twardzik and Travis Gorby were selected as the 2013-14 Garfield High School “OHSAA Scholar Athletes of the Year”. Ironically they were both soccer players and have played together since 2005 on various travel teams, etc.

The criteria for the Award was.

1. Minimum of 3.25 or above G.P.A.

2. Minimum of Four Varsity Letters.

3. Three of the Varsity Letters must be in the same sport.

4. Must have taken either the ACT or SAT national tests  (Emma and Travis both scored above 27 on their ACT).

5. Team leader/Good role model.

 

 

 

For the ninth year in its more than 30 years of history the Garrettsville Eagles Club No 2705 has award four $750.00 scholarships to family members of members.

Bradley Kowalski is a  2014 graduate of Windham High School as valedictorian and is accepted both by Bowling Green and Kent State universities. After he makes his choice will major in Pre-Med aiming for Sports Related Physical Therapy.

Brad was involved in sports, varsity letterman. second team honors in baseball. He had part-time jobs and contributed community services.

Kaylie Johnson, is a 2014 graduate of Champion High School and will attend Mt. Union majoring in Early Childhood and Special Education. Her goal is to be K-3 or a special ed teacher in a public or private school.

Kaylie was member of the Honors Society, Student of the month in February, 2014, member of the Key Club, CTC Varsity Bowling Team and Color Guard. She is involved in church youth group and church nursery.

Rebecca Kern is a 2014 James A Garfield High School graduate and has been accepted by Bowling Green University this fall. She plans to be an Intervention Specialist with a degree in Special Education.

She was president of the National  Honor Society,member of the Marching Band, Pep Band, Concert Band, involved in Yuletide Revels, Christmas Celebration and counselor at Camp Fitch. In her spare time she is employed at Miller’s Family Restaurant.

Justin Vaughan is a 2014 graduate of Crestwood High School and will attend Slippery Rock University in PA. He is aiming for a degree in Sports Management. He will minor in Journalism with hope of being a sports writer.

He was captain of the Tennis Club for 3 years, member of the Community Service Club, Yearbook, Awarded Coaches, Captain and Participation recognition.Went on two missions to help those effected by hurricanes, cleared streets, and put on events such as Halloween Carnival and Father-Daughter dance.

The scholarships awarded are in addition to the club’s support of several community services which we hope to continue in future years with the support of our members and the community.

Morgan Aebischer

Stephanie Alexander

Ziad Al-Noubani

Daniel Anders

Kyle Angermeier

Trevor Baldwin-Hoobler

Brianna Bandy

Katie Bartlett

Shelby Baughman

Austin Bracken

Anna Brigham

Jessica Britton

Alan Broadwater

Simeon Brown

Marilyn Brunton

Samuel Buganski

Mason Butler

Victoria Carnahan

Trevor Chambers

Chase Chapman

Kaley Collins

Jared Damko

Cassie Daniels

John Davenport

Brandon Davis

Jamie Davis

Holly DeYoung

Olivia Doraski

Seth Duvall

Michael Ebie

Tessa Flattum

David Forgony

Ashley Freiberg

Christopher Gadus

Katlyn Gembicki

Krista Gholson

Caitlynn Gilles

Candace Glinski

Travis Gorby

Sasha Gough

Assyria Gray

Kevin Griggy

Racheal Gruszewski

Alec Hartman

Jewels Haylett

Ryan Hecky

Kyle Heim

Ethan Hoffmann

Zachary Hoffmann

Courtney Hood

Sarah Hyde

Adriene Kearney

Jessica Kelley

Megan Kenesky

Rebecca Kern

Erica King

Kayla Kuzniakowski

Yakira Lane

Jeffrey Lange

Thomas Learn

Andrew Lininger

Savannah Lorinchack

Tiffani Lucas

Nicole Lytle

Thomas Macerol

Fredrick Maxey

Skyy McCune

Whitney Miller

Joshua Moore

Alexandria Nowak

Sarah Perkins

Renee Perrault

Emily Perrine

Tyler Petersen

Roger Pierce

Nathan Pinson

Zachary Porcase

Kennedy Porter

Nathan Pratt

Edana Rankin

Megan Rohrbaugh

Karen Root

Cooper Roubic

Shay Sane

Dustin Savick

Jonathan Seaman

Kurt Selesky

Allison Seneff

Zachary Silvis

Kaitlyn Siracki

Zoey Smith

Jay Spencer

Summer Stevens

Shannon Stowe

Nicole Thompson

Brittany Thornton

Samantha Tubre

Emma Twardzik

Andrew Weisbarth

Amber Wenger

Laura Wilburn

Scott Williams

Anthony Workman

Mirsadies Yon

Shannon Young

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Ian Sterling Adams

Jacob Louis Agle

Victoria Hope Andexler

Clyde Douglas Arnett

Taylor Leigh Atkins

George William Baran

Landis Grant Bates

Douglas Guy Battiest

BreAnna Lee Benner

Carrigan Alyssa Benoit

Ryan Adam Bernhard

Tod Allen Bevilacqua

Lauren Olivia Bissell

Charles Wesley Blankenship

Megan Leann Blankenship

Mikayla Rae Blankenship

Tyler Richard Brady

Sarah Ann Bridgman

Kyle Stephen Brookover

Miranda Louise Brothers

Emily Katherine Bruyere

Travis James Burkett

Erin Marie Calvey

Brittany Renae Campbell

Samantha Lee Canepa

Samantha Rose Cannella

Jordan Ashland Carver

Danielle Raye Cavanaugh

Jenna Marie Cisar

Madison May Cochrane

Kyle Stanley Cox

Anthony James Crabtree

Matthew Thomas Czerny

Damon Conrad Daugherty

Alexander James DeHoff

Carolyn Ann Diczhazy

Kayla Faith Diroll

Erin Marie Dunkin

Morgan Jolene Engelhart

Daniel Troy Evans

Jessica Marie Felker

Brian Charles Ferguson

Michael Robert Fletcher

Mariah Lynn Focareto

Julianna Sereita Forster

Amanda Elizabeth Fosnight

Cheyenna Sky Frederick

Dustin Charles Friend

Tyler Joseph Gall

Mathew David Gerdes

Angela Marie Goodrich

Ashlea Josette Gopp

Meaghan Michelle Green

Nathan Perry Green

Mackenzie Diann Gregoire

Carley Renee Gross

Monica Elizabeth Groves

Matthew Dominic Gualtieri

Hannah Lynn Hall

Joshua Tyler Hampton

Dillon Scott Harmon

Eric Robert Harris

Amber Lynn Harrison

Holly Lynne Hays

Sierra Mae Hobbs

David Anthony Hocevar

Daniel Adam Holmberg

Ryan Michael Houpt

Christopher Keith Howell

Patrick Lee Hoyack

Brooke Nicole Hunter

Summer Nicole Hurd

Cody Joseph Imars

Kenn Edward Jackson

Alyssa Nicole Jaehn

Jonathan Thomas Jastal

Nicholas Steve Jelinek

Taylor Paige Jenkins

Kristen Elizabeth Jones

Nicholas Robert Kehres

Hannah Lee Kelley

John Roger Kilbourne

Daniel Jacob Klatik

Amanda Jane Krakowski

Victoria Eve Krause

Samantha Marie Kulish

Kayla Rita Kulla

Shawnee Nicole Kvasnicka

Nicholas Robert Labas

Elizabeth Rose LaMarca

Stacey Elizabeth Larch

Jose Francisco Lebron

Allison Renee Little

Kyle Thomas Lohr

Joshua Tyler Lorence

Jacob William Lovick

Randi Kristine Lyle

Matthew Allen Lyons

Danielle DeNyse Magyarics

John  Luke McCraw

Nolan Blake McGarvey

Taylor Courtney Michael

Marissa  Elizabeth Midgley

Darian Payton Milam

Abbey Melissa Milkovich

Arizona Rose Misseldine

Jacob Connor Monreal

Samantha Nicole Moore

Jenna Marie Morgenstern

Kathleen Yeva Murray

Conner Samuel Nemec

Alaina Marie Nuti

Olivia  O’Brien Cobb

Jack Edward Onders

Jonah Tyler Onuska

Brendan Jay Osborne

Dylan Ray Parker

Katey Irene Paxton

Nicole Chessie Perkins

Julia Louise Pfaff

Charles  James Phillips

Rebecca Margaret Pochedly

Gary Thomas Pope

Joseph Frank Prenosil

Rachel Marie Quesenberry

Chad Alan Randall

Clayton Austin Jesus Ramirez

Taylor Lynn Rector

Velonte Marquis Reddick

Carley Jean Reid

Joseph Donald Reyes

Mary Ruth Richards

Daryl Ross Riley

Challis Margaret Roberts

Anna Marie Claire Romano

Tyler Austin Roth

Skylar Sierra Scala

Dillon Errol Scott Schaefer

Ashley Nicole Seneff

Charles Francis Shahan

Kaitlyn Mackenzie Shahan

Ariel Nicole Sherry

Nathan Michael Silcox

Melissa Rose Skocdopole

Kaitlin Michelle Slaker

Makenzie Kenneth Snodgrass

Abigail Lynn Soltisz

Hanna Elizabeth Spencer

Emily Ann St. Hilaire

Dakota Lee Stanley

Jonathan Peter Stewart

Julianna Nicole Stewart

Raymond Michael Stewart

Henry Arnold Strahan

Zachary Ian Strenk

Reanna Leigh Szarka

Chase Marie Tayerle

Nicholas James Thomas

Katie Lynn Tibbs

Ashley Renee Todd

Craig Darrin Turner

Allison Rae Vannoy

Amber Lynn Vargo

Justin Martin Vaughan

Christopher William Vince

Deena Marie Vodila

Jacquelyn Renee Wagner

Aaron Richard Yonker

Nicholas John Timothy Zeleznik

Jake Anthony Zemaitis

Marisa Lynn Zolgus

Sarah Jane Zolgus

Logan Louis Zuponcic

HONORARY DIPLOMAS

Emeric De Sermet de Tournefort

Iya Erkenovna Tsedenova

 

Sherry Jones and Mayor Rick Patrick prepare to draw the winning ticket.

Sherry Jones and Mayor Rick Patrick prepare to draw the winning ticket.

Garrettsville – Months ago I challenged the James A. Garfield students to take an active part in a fundraising effort to kick off renovations to the schools’ athletic facilities. Our students accepted the challenge with great fervor, and I am proud to report that the “Challenge Raffle” winner was drawn at noon on Friday, May 30th by Mayor Rick Patrick in the James A. Garfield Board Office.  The winner of the $1,000 grand prize was Stephanie Kristoff. The winning ticket was sold to her by her son, kindergartner AJ Kristoff.

On behalf of the James A. Garfield Schools I would like to congratulate Mrs. Kristoff and thank everyone who sold and purchased tickets for the raffle.  I would also like to thank Mrs. Sherry Jones for organizing this successful effort.  Without her passion, organization and impeccable record-keeping we never would have been able to experience such success.

The final breakdown for the raffle is as follows:

Total Sales:  $28,260.00

Expenses:     $6,041.86

Net Profit:  $22,218.14

It is important to note that $4,173.14 of the expenses went directly back to the kids in the form of t-shirts, gift cards and a skating party at Roller Hutt.  These rewards kept the excitement and motivation going throughout the raffle.

With the funds collected, improvements will be made to the stadium this summer to make play safer for our athletes. As you drive by the stadium you will begin to see the following work taking place:

Phase 1 – Safety of players and fans – Total Cost:  $17,938.57

?  Replace wood posts and ropes with four foot safety fencing ($6,438.57)

?   Install new goal posts ($0 – donated by G-Men Foundation)

?  Stabilize visitor bleachers with a permanent concrete pad ($11,500)

?  Move field away from home bleachers by 10 feet ($0)

The remaining $4,279.57 will be deposited to the JAG All Sports Booster account and used for Phase 2, which will focus on the spectator experience.  The next steps for the project are outlined by the following Phases:

Phase 2 – Spectator seating

?  Purchase safety and ADA compliant aluminum bleachers

?  Construct new press box

Phase 3 – Fan experience

?  Construct new concession booths

?  Construct permanent ADA compliant restrooms

Phase 4 – Scoreboard and track

?  Construction of all-weather track

?  Installation of new field scoreboards

This is just the beginning of the work that needs to be done.  Our athletic facilities are tired and need attention. It is inspiring to see so many individuals working together toward the goal of making them safer and more enjoyable for our students and spectators.

As always, if you have any questions, please call me directly in the office (330.527.4336) or on my cell (216.534.7413).

 

Garrettsville – The Brittany Myers Scholarship Fund was founded in 2001 as a memorial to Brittany, a 9 year old little girl who lost her life in a tragic car accident in 2000. Brittany attended James A. Garfield Elementary School where she was an avid softball player and a complete joy to everyone. Left behind are her parents, Tom and Belinda Myers, along with siblings and many loved ones.

The Brittany Myers Memorial Poker Run is held on the first Saturday in August.  This event generates the monies for the scholarship program in which two scholarships are awarded each year to graduating seniors at James A. Garfield High School. Students’ GPA, community service, academic and athletic achievements, future goals and a 300 word essay are taken into consideration when choosing the winners. This year’s recipients are Amber Wenger and Cooper Roubic.  Congratulations seniors!

In addition to the annual scholarships, the fund has also contributed to the Youth Softball League and the Special Needs Program at James A. Garfield School.

For more information on the fund raiser, or to make a donation, please feel free to contact Jamie Cain at (330)221-6338.

 

Mantua – Specialist Adam Scott Hamilton was one of the top marksmen in his unit and was assigned as a sniper. Since joining the U.S. Army in March, 2009 Specialist Hamilton has been awarded the Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, and the National Defense Service Medal. But he was more than that to Crestwood student Nick Krestan — Adam was his big brother. Three years ago, when Nick was a student at Crestwood Intermediate, he and his classmates wrote letters to Adam, sharing what they were learning in the book, On the Wings Of Heroes  by Richard Peck. Nick’s class, and the entire school, read the book as a part of the school’s first One Book, One School program that year. Unfortunately, Adam, who was serving in the US Army in Afghanistan, died in battle on May 28th, before he had the chance to meet his brother’s classmates at CIS. Adam was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star, Purple Heart and NATO medal. He was 22 years old.

At the time of his death in 2001, a tree was planted in his honor on the grounds of the school. This past Friday, Adam was once again honored by Crestwood Intermediate School when his memorial was dedicated in the presence of his family. The dedication coincided with the closing event of this year’s One Book, One School program, which again featured Peck’s book, On the Wings of Heroes.

“It fills our hearts to know that these communities wrap their arms around and comfort us. It’s wonderful how much people care,” beamed Adam’s father, Scott Hamilton. “Memorial Day is so much more than hot dogs and a day off. It’s so important to help keep Adam’s memory alive, and all the other men and women who are lost.”  After the dedication, Crestwood students, the Hamilton family, and area veterans enjoyed a jalopy parade similar to the one described in Peck’s book.

As spectators waved American flags, the Crestwood marching band led the parade, which also featured Army vehicles and classic cars. Through their month-long literacy program, CIS students and staff raised money for the National Museum of the U.S. Army in Virginia. In addition to a financial donation, two bricks will be placed in the Museum’s walkway — one in honor of Mantua veterans, and one in honor of Specialist Adam Hamilton, with the designation ‘On Wings of Heroes’ to commemorate this year’s program. In addition, students and community members have the opportunity to register veterans into the National Museum of the U.S. Army soldier database. The Soldier’s Registry provides an opportunity to recognize and honor soldiers who are currently serving or have previously served in the U.S. Army, Army Reserve, or Army National Guard. The Soldier’s Registry will be prominently displayed at The National Museum of the United States Army, and is available at no charge. For more information, visit armyhistory.org.

“It’s amazing how they were able to bring students in touch with what happens during war,” continued Hamilton, noting that the U.S. has been engaged in war in the Middle East for over ten years. “There are a lot of families impacted,” Hamilton noted, “but events like this can effect them in a positive way.” He expressed his hope that some day, some of today’s students might return here to share his son’s memorial, and today’s experience, with their own children.

Specialist Adam Hamilton is survived by his parents Scott and Connie Hamilton of Kent and Nancy Krestan, of Mantua; as well as his siblings Nick Krestan; and Brandon, Shawney and Taya Hamilton. In his honor, the family has created the Adam Hamilton Memorial Academic and Athletic Scholarship Fund. The Fund helps keep his memory alive through recognizing major accomplishments of Kent Roosevelt students, where Hamilton graduated in 2007. Each year, the Fund awards two $10,000 scholarships – for graduating male and female Kent Roosevelt High School students. For more information, call (330) 274-2961.

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Mantua – At the last meeting of the Crestwood School Board, the 2014 District retirees were honored for their combined 255 years of service in the District. Middle School Principal Julie Schmitt, Intermediate Principal Michelle Gerbrick, Director of Pupil Services Mike Maglionico, and past School Board member Martha Phillips spoke on behalf of the retirees, sharing laughter and a few tears as they thanked their colleagues and wished them well. Superintendent David Toth remarked, “I’d like to commend these people for their efforts and dedication and thank you for your service. You’ll all be missed.”

IMG_8008

Crestwood District retirees Patricia Eskridge, Pamela Braden, Mary Lou Bernotas, Edward Nichols, Janet Wilkins, Gerrie Zimkosky, and Eileen Shahan were honored at the last School Board meeting. Retireees Theresa Duesing and Rick Hall were not present that evening.

Next up, District Treasurer Jill Rowe presented an updated five-year-forecast for the district. The forecast represents budget cuts and payroll reductions, as well as considerable savings in forecast healthcare costs. Regarding the improved budget, Ms. Rowe stated, “It took a lot of hard work to get here.” In similar news, Superintendent Toth shared that he and his team had completed several grant applications that would help provide Crestwood with resources to become a 21st century learning campus.

The Straight A grant is valued at between $1 million and $15 million, and could provide funds for online courses, STEM classrooms, and resources for a media center that would be available to the community. Other grants include a federal health and wellness grant to cover the cost to employ additional therapists and guidance counselors to the District, and a grant to fund a K-grade four summer reading program. Grants will be awarded later this year. Mr. Toth explained, “It’s part of my job, and my team of administrators, to find money to help our kids and teachers to the betterment of Crestwood.”

In other news, Primary School Principal Cindy Ducca and Intermediate Principal Michelle Gerbrick explained the latest changes and how their schools are working with the Third Grade Guarantee. They highlighted plans to help those students in danger of scoring below the acceptable target reading scores, and outlined the many ways the school is currently intervening and providing additional support to the students and their families. In addition, a summer reading program has been implemented. Afterward, School Board member Dave Becker commented about the dangers of becoming too test-focused, stating, “We want to develop a love of reading, not a fear of testing.”

Later, Crestwood High School teachers Angus McDougall and Sarah Moore shared their thoughts on teaching the American Experience Academy, a cross-cultural class in experiential learning. According to McDougall, the class helps students develop a unique skill-set that helps them, “engage with learning.” McDougall shared that the program benefits the district in many ways, including as a collaborative opportunity among other buildings within the district, serving as a field trip destination for classes at the Intermediate School. In addition, next year’s program will incorporate a journalism element, where students will write articles and shoot photos about various aspects of the Academy.

The next regularly scheduled school board meeting will be held on Monday, June 2nd at 7 pm in the High School Library. In addition, previous meeting minutes and video recordings of school board meetings can be viewed at crestwoodschools.org.

 

garrettsville-garfield-high-school-banners

Garrettsville – Pictured From Left to Right, are the painters of the new banners hanging in front of James A. Garfield High School: Danielle Konecek, Shannon Stowe, Renee Perrault, Savannah Sheer, Dicey Miller, Edana Rankin, Casey Mansell, Anna Brigham, Ally Milano, Libby Frato-Sweeney, Madisson Geddes, Brittany Davis, Whitney Miller, Todd Barton.  Not Pictured: Madeline Lininger, Katlyn Simpson.

Garrettsville - Take THAT, Creepy Karpis! A northeast Ohio tornado watch didn’t stop interested folks from turning up at the Iva Walker Auditorium on Wednesday, May 15, 2014 to get the low-down on “Two Grants, and Three Giant Leaps” for the James A. Garfield Schools and the Garrettsville Communities.  Perhaps they were reassured by the tommy-gun toting G-Man at the door.  Persons of note from across the county and a gubernatorial representative from Columbus were on hand, as was Mayor Rick Patrick and a spokesman from the Ohio Historical Preservation Office.  Hiram College’s departing president, Thomas Chema bade the district farewell and acknowledged the coming of the college’s first woman president,  Dr. Lori Varlotta, and the willingness of the institution to participate in  the rebuilding after the “Buckeye Block Fire”.

It had all begun with a welcome from Julie Thompson, historian and recent Hiram College graduate, who had organized the evening, and the playing of the National Anthem by the James A. Garfield Band(It was at least partly about a national event, after all).Superintendent  Ted Lysiak gave opening remarks and thanks to the participants and the custodial staff which always finishes up the parade.  Rick Patrick acknowledged the outstanding services provided by the First Responders, from GFNVFD and mutual assistance communities, on the occasion of the fire and recognized the members who were in attendance.  Congressman Dave Joyce was introduced by JAG student Mark Butto and gave remarks of encouragement and support.  Kit Semplak, president of the James A. Garfield Historical Society, greeted the crowd and  offered a glimpse of the history of the lost Buckeye Block; the youngest member of the historical society, Grace Edwards, presented a summary of the Last Great Train Heist and its national     effects.  Then came the re-enactment of the event itself as narrated by Julie Thompson, based on the book by Alvin “Creepy” Karpis, gang leader.  The Garfield drama students in period attire brought the event to life and even hustled some celebrity  hold-up victims across the stage.  These were none other than the current county commissioners—Kathleen Chandler, Maureen Frederick and Sabrina Christian-Bennett.  These worthies, at the conclusion of the re-enactment, unveiled the fact that the Village of Garrettsville had been awarded a CDBG (Community Development Block Grant) to the tune of $75,000 to aid in the re-development—streetscape, lighting, parking, etc.—of the business district.

The wrap-up of the event came after brief remarks by Jonathan Vimr of the Ohio Historical Society when the new state historical marker(which had been draped in a Garrettsville bicentennial throw) was revealed with a flourish by Kit Semplak and Portage County Auditor, Janet Esposito.  Ta-Daaah!

The JAG band played the Garfield Alma Mater.

The great variety of tasty and timely refreshments after the ceremony were graciously provided by the Nelson United Methodist Church.

Thanks to all.

 

Garrettsville – Sunday, May 18, 2014 was the BIG SHOW (Anybody remember Ed Sullivan?  Never mind). Opened with the High School Concert Band’s rendition of “The Star Spangled Banner” and proceeding through the presentations of the Intermediate School Fifth Grade Band, the Middle School Concert Band and the Intermediate School Sixth Grade Band to the big finish with the High School Concert Band, it was an excellent finale to the year in instrumental music.

The selections ranged from “Attack of the Slide Trombones” through “Old Time Rock & Roll”, a “Philharmonic Phun Phest” and “The Low Brass Brigade” by the younger musicians to “Disney at the Movies”(Surely fitting after the band’s trip to Disney this spring), “Flight of the Bumble Bee”(featuring  Nick Crawford, percussionist extraordinaire), an “Instant Concert” with iconic melodies from all over, “The Stars and Stripes Forever” with a somewhat steroidal piccolo contribution by tubist Michael Ebie and an absolutely lights-out number, “Voodoo”, a sonic tour de force  of jungle beats and hypnotic sounds—great stuff!  Finishing up the program was the Garfield “Fight Song” segueing into “Hang On, Sloopy” and a tremendous drum corps display of percussion mastery.

Congratulations to the directors,  Theo Cebulla and Joe Gaither, who have put together a music program everyone in the district can be proud of.  Thanks to all of the boosters and contributors whose time, efforts and patience  have helped to make it all possible.  Thanks to the musicians who have given it their all, all for a good cause.

 

Aurora - James A. Garfield Senior, Anna Brigham was awarded the “Saved by the Belt Award” by the Ohio State Patrol at Aurora Farms Outlets in Aurora, Ohio Saturday, May 17, 2014 at their annual kick-off for the “Click it or Ticket” campaign.

brigham-aurora-garfieldstudent-seatbeltMiss Brigham survived a head-on collision during blizzard-like conditions on February 27, 2014 near the intersection of State Routes 303 and 88 in Freedom Township. Although Anna suffered minor injuries, she realizes she is here today because she wore a seatbelt.

This award was brought back this year after several years of hiatus and was presented to Anna by Ohio State Troopers Sergeant Bruce D. Zuchowski and Trooper Griffin Kelly; both troopers represent the Hiram Patrol Post, which serves an 82 mile stretch of the Ohio Turnpike.

The program that awards the “Saved by the Belt Award” is Safe Communities, which is an educational division of Portage County that is financed to raise awareness for seatbelt safety based on a three year period of fatalities within the county.

Here are some recent statistics on seat belt use or lack thereof:

1: 63% of fatalities are caused from not wearing a seatbelt

2: Data suggests education alone is just not doing the job, especially for males ages 16-25. They just don’t think they’ll be injured or killed in an accident

3: If  90% of Americans buckle up, we will prevent more than 5,500 deaths and 132,000 injuries annually.

4: The cost of unbuckled drivers and passengers goes beyond those killed and the loss to their families. We all pay for those who don’t buckle up ¬ in higher taxes, higher health care and higher insurance costs.

On average, inpatient hospital care costs for an unbelted crash victim are 50% higher than those for a belted crash victim. Society bears 85% of those costs, not the individuals involved. Every American pays about $580 a year toward the cost of crashes. If everyone buckled up, this figure would drop significantly.

 

Motorists who refuse to wear their seat belts – beware.  The 2014 national Click It or Ticket seat belt enforcement mobilization kicked off May 19 to help save lives by cracking down on those who don’t buckle up.

The Hiram Police Department is joining with other state and local law enforcement officers and highway safety advocates across the country to help save more lives by strongly enforcing seat belt laws around the clock.

While this year’s Click It or Ticket enforcement mobilization runs from May 21 through June 3, motorists should know that officers are out enforcing seat belt laws year-round.

Garrettsville – The  Campus of Excellence steering committee met on May 15 (third Thursday of the month, MS Library/Media Center) for a progress report and quick look at the construction of the new elementary school addition to house the fifth and sixth grade, come August.

The first question had to do with the weather and its effect on the situation.  Can we say “wet”?  Things are moving along as quickly as possible, given the precipitation, and once some drying takes place, it will be full steam ahead…and then some.  The design-build company overseeing the project has built in contingency planning and is prepared to put “pedal to the metal” when it is necessary and feasible to meet deadlines…seven days a week if need be.

Color schemes.  Who thought about them? Paint? That’s all  in the works—field (background) colors, accent colors.  Carpet tiles and floor tiles, walls, work areas, the clinic, restrooms, public meeting space, hallways—all in the mix; different requirements for different uses.  Don’t even THINK about Fifty Shades of Gray.

The block walls are about to go up (see : weather). The structural steel is waiting in the wings.  Concrete trucks will be bringing in some 18,000 cubic feet of the base material—20-25 truckloads—for the foundation.  New valves and hydrants for the water system, campus-wide, will be added.  New schematics for the power supply will be added, individualizing the buildings, and requiring a power shutdown as well as a water supply interruption at some future point.  Summer school will be moved to the Middle School this year in consideration of the requirements of the situation and the safety of students.  Timmerman GeoTech has been and will continue to monitor construction details that most of us would never think of—soil moisture, concrete standards, etc.—testing as we go to ensure compliance with highest standards of construction , health and safety.  The building will be grounded to lessen the dangers of lightning strikes.  Who would have thought of that?

And all of that stuff in the Park Avenue building that has to go somewhere until it finds a new home in the new building?  Through the good offices of two local, school-involved guys, board member Deral White and perennial coach and booster, Larry Roach, those materials will be stored in two semi trailers, which will be loaded by the football team…and probably unloaded too—good body-building exercise.

It’s a GO, folks.  To (mis)quote a famous American admiral(Farragut), “Damn the weather reports!  Full speed ahead!”

 

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Portage County - Area eighth-grade students have the opportunity to experience life as health professions students during MEDCAMP, a three-day intensive immersion experience for eighth graders who have demonstrated achievement in science and an interest in a health professions career.

Applicants are currently being sought to fill 50 openings for this year’s program, which will be held at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) July 17-19, 2014..

Now in its 24th year, MEDCAMP is designed to provide “hands-on” experiences in bio-medical science workshops involving research, clinical problem-solving and an introduction to the fields of clinical medicine and pharmacy. Students join physicians, pharmacists, NEOMED students, faculty and researchers in performing applied activities, where they learn how a physician talks with a patient, how to study the clues to a patient’s illness, to solve medical cases by using critical thinking skills in addition to learning modern laboratory techniques. Students also complete a case study on a fictitious patient.

Meals are provided. Accompanied by chaperones, students are transported by bus to a Kent State University dormitory for overnight accommodations. Tuition for the three-day experience is $125.. A limited number of tuition waivers are available for eligible students.

Applicants must be current eighth-grade students (will have completed eighth grade at the time of MEDCAMP), who excel in science and math. Potential participants may be nominated for the program by a teacher, guidance counselor or may nominate themselves. First consideration is given to applicants from groups underrepresented in health care professions. Students selected to participate in MEDCAMP must reside in Ashtabula, Carroll, Columbiana, Mahoning, Portage, Richland, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas, Trumbull or Wayne Counties.

Information about MEDCAMP and applications may be found online at www.neomed.edu/academics/ahec/medcamp or by calling: 330.325.6584. Applications are due by April 18, 2014. MEDCAMP is sponsored by Ohio’s Region III Area Health Education Center (AHEC).

 

Garrettsville – On Tuesday, May 6th, Apple Tree Preschool held our annual Trike-a-Thon fundraiser to help raise money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Students collected money and then rode their trikes or bikes in the parking lot for 30 minutes.  The fundraiser is also an educational tool to help teach our students about the importance of bike safety.  This is the seventh year that Apple Tree Preschool has held the fundraiser, and this year our students raised $1900.00.  All the proceeds from the Trike-a-Thon go directly to St. Jude Hospital.

AppleTreeApple Tree Preschool is a Step Up to Quality Three Star Award winning preschool located at the Garrettsville United Methodist Church on Park Avenue.  We are currently accepting registrations for students for our fall classes.  Classes offered include a 3-Year-Old class that meets from 9:15 – 11:30 on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and a Pre-kindergarten class that meets from 12:15 – 2:30 on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.  Please call the church office at 330-527-2055 for information on registering your child for fall.

Mantua – For the fourth year in a row, lively literacy takes Crestwood Intermediate students well beyond the pages of a book. At least as far as Canton, Ohio, to the Military Aviation Preservation Society (MAPS) museum. That’s where students and staff recently visited, as a part of the fourth annual One Book, One School program, and thanks to a generous grant from the Hiram Community Trust. Although the students didn’t see a B-17 like the one in the book, “On the Wings of Heroes,” that the entire school is reading, they had the opportunity to meet veterans who did. One such individual is WWII veteran Ralph Lynn, who flew 32 missions during the war. Lynn, who is now 94 years old, serves as a tour guide at the museum, where the leather bomber jacket he wore during those missions is now on display. He served as a guide for several groups of Crestwood students, leading them through the museum’s aircraft and displays.

Lynn has a good deal of experience sharing the MAPS museum with older folks like himself, who lived through that time.  However, he noted the difficulty he sometimes has in sharing his experiences with younger children with little knowledge of that time. Since the Crestwood students were currently learning about the war through the One Book, One School program, Lynn was able to, “add a little more meat to what they’ve read,” and give them a more real picture of those who served.

While at the MAPS museum, students had the opportunity to climb aboard a C-41 plane to learn how troops may have felt as they prepared to invade Normandy, or see a variety of aircraft on display and under restoration, including a MiG-17, B-26 Marauder, and AH-1 Cobra aircrafts. They also had the opportunity to climb aboard a Goodyear GZ-22 Blimp Gondola. In addition, groups had the opportunity to tour a ‘MASH’ era field hospital; similar to the one museum guide Ted Mathies served at as a medic in Viet Nam. Within the one tent on display, Mathies explained how soldiers could receive treatment for minor discomforts like a sore throats or cavities, to major surgeries like amputations, removing shrapnel, or, “putting your nose back on your face.”

Mathies shared that a 200-bed field hospital’s 27 tents can be set up in 24 hours anywhere in the world. He encouraged visitors to handle the instruments, tools, and equipment, and ask lots of questions. When asked about an odd-looking canvas bag with a hanging loop on top, and watering can sprinkler at the bottom, he explained to shocked students how to use a field shower, explaining, “If you wanted privacy, you’d have to close your eyes.”

MAPS museum literature notes that, “History was not made by airplanes, but by the men and women who designed, build and flew them.” As such, students had the opportunity to experience aviation up close through a tour of the museum’s Gallery of Heroes. They saw artifacts, learned about the men and women who served during the war, and saw a piece of the USS Arizona, sunk by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor.

As we stood under the 1908 Martin Glider, Ralph Lynn remarked excitedly, “Look how far we’ve come in 100 years,” noting the development from a simple wood and canvas glider to high-tech machines for travel to the moon. “I’d love to be around to see how far we can come in the next 100 years,” he concluded.

So what did students think of their experience at MAPS? Kylie, a fourth-grader, liked the opportunity to go inside a plane to find out what it’s like to be a paratrooper, like her father. Her classmate Jackson, an automotive enthusiast, added, “I liked viewing the planes, and trying to identify the different parts.”  For more information on the MAPS museum, visit www.mapsmuseum.org.

Back at Crestwood Intermediate, students have their own mini-museum. “It’s just amazing that all this came out of a book,” marvels Crestwood Intermediate guidance counselor Gary Traveny, as he looks around the darkened classroom. The classroom-turned-memorabilia museum is filled with photographs, uniforms, artifacts, and multimedia materials about the Second World War, on loan from community members. The temporary exhibit was compiled to augment the special month-long ‘One Book, One School’ program at CIS. The featured book, ‘On the Wings of Heroes,’ by Richard Peck, is the story of a young boy, and his brother who flies B-17s during World War II.

As you enter CIS, and come face-to-face with a vintage Army Jeep®, you know that the school is entranced with  the book. The entire school — roughly 400 students and staff from grades three through five – has been reading the book, and they have toured the exhibit to study the materials, and learn what individuals  from this generation experienced in the WWII. Through the exhibit, students had the opportunity to hear a recording of the Andrews Sisters singing “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy,” and see a video clip of Kate Smith singing Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America.”

They heard the amazing, true story of Nicholas Winton, a stockbroker from London, who saved 669 Jewish children from death at the hands of the Nazis in Czechoslovakia. Students were surprised to learn how the British version of the Monopoly board game was used to help troops shot down in Germany escape POW camps.  Through the interpretive classroom, students saw German and Japanese memorabilia, as well as a copy of the August 14, 1945 Akron Beacon Journal newspaper noting the end of the war in the Pacific. The materials are on loan from private collectors including the Tayerle family, Mr. Delcalzo, the Marusiak Family, Mrs. Krupar and Mr. Traveny.

This year, CIS students are supporting the National Museum of the U.S. Army through the purchase of personalized dog tags. In addition, students and community members have the opportunity to register an Army veteran through a soldier registry at no charge. Soldiers registered through this program will be included in an exhibit at the National Museum of the U.S. Army in Virginia. During past One Book, One School programs, CIS has supported the Flight 93 Memorial, provided Vermont Teddy Bears to Akron Children’s Hospital, and supplied books to an elementary school in Akron through the First Book organization.

The month-long program concludes at 9 am on Friday, May 23rd, when a plaque will be installed to honor Adam Hamilton, the brother of Crestwood student Nick Kreston. Hamilton was killed while serving in Afghanistan four years ago. The plaque will be placed near a tree that was planted in Hamilton’s honor shortly after his death. After the brief ceremony, students and staff will participate in a jalopy parade, featuring area veterans. For more information on the program, contact Gary Traveny at Crestwood Primary, (330) 357-8203.

 

Hiram – Recently, roughly 2,000 high school seniors from 16 area schools arrived on the Hiram College campus. The students weren’t there en masse for a college visit or orientation opportunity, but for a serious lesson to guide them in making good decisions during the upcoming prom and graduation season.

As students arrived, they encountered a mock crash scene in the parking lot. Area fire trucks, an ambulance and EMS crews from several cities aided “victims” who were trapped inside the twisted wreckage. The graphic scene served to grab students’ attention, and served to set the stage for the rest of the morning’s events. But the purpose wasn’t to simply to show students a shocking scene. “The goal is to reduce teenage fatalities, especially during prom and graduation season,” said Lynette Basiman, Director of Portage County Safe Communities.

The None Under 21 program focuses on the simple choices students can make today, to avoid the very real consequences from drunk or distracted driving. As the program began, Hiram President Thomas Chema addressed the teens, sharing that in 2006, two of Hiram’s students were killed and another was severely injured when a drunk driver struck the car in which they were riding.

A father, Marc Streem, shared the loss of his youngest son, Ryan, a student at Rootstown. Ryan lost his life at the age of 14 in a motor vehicle accident. Next, college student and survivor of a drunk-driving crash, Melinda Mason, shared the experience and recovery. Mason began speaking publically after being hit by a drunk driver in April of 2013. Lastly, students listened as convicted felon, Aaron Cooksey, the man responsible for killing his best friend, recalls the choice he made to drink and drive, and the burden of the consequences he must continue to bear.

At the close of the program, students are directed through the “Walk of Remembrance,” an emotional tribute to local families who have lost loved ones due to traffic-related crashes. As students quietly walk through the hallway, they pause to see family members standing in tribute to loved ones they have lost. This year’s walk of remembrance honored Brad Bauer, Teresa Conti, Emily Goldsmith, Christopher Graves, Russ Wanchick, Joseph Nirchl, Donovan Svab, Ada Van Horn, Ryan Streem, Grace Chamberlain and Andy Hopkins.

Even though a mock crash scene greeted them at the start of the program, by the event conclusion, students have no doubt of the real losses that can result from poor choices. Moved by the program, many students shed tears, with some offering hugs or handshakes to families of victims as they made their way through the Walk of Remembrance.

According to Hiram Village Police Chief Ed Samec, “None 4 Under 21 hits hard! The students hear REAL LIFE stories and they feel the emotions from the presenters. The Walk of Remembrance has substantial impacts on the students. They look at the pictures and then look into the eyes of the family members standing next to the pictures. They see the heartbreak in the eyes of the family members and it’s a hard reality that this is for REAL!”

Prior to the event, one of the sponsors, Elk & Elk, challenged each school to create a banner containing a message related to the event. The winning team from Newton Falls High School won $2,000 to help fund alcohol-free prom and graduation activities at their school. A check for $1,000 went to the second place team from Windham High School.

The following sponsors made this year’s None 4 Under 21 program possible: the Ohio Troopers Coalition; the law firm of Elk & Elk; Jason Durica, Allstate Insurance; Hughes Event Production Services; Wood Kortright Borkoski Funeral Home; Portage Granite & Marble; Portage County Prosecutor Victor Vigluicci; Gateway Towing & Recovery; Hiram College; the Aurora Schools Foundation and the Fraternal Order of Police.