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Garrettsville-Hiram Rotarians were treated to a  local small business success story at their noon meeting on Monday, October 20 as Jessica Brokaw described the commercial progress of her husband, Doug Seaman, of Doug Seaman Decorating, LLC ,recently one of the local contractors involved in the work on the addition to the James A. Garfield Elementary school.  The painters always get the last walk-through and their commitment to quality is evident all over the building.  Doug began painting with his dad ( and now with his father and son) and other contractors then decided to take the leap into being an independent business upon landing a contract with Applebee’s, Inc.  An LLC (limited liability company) is a flexible form of enterprise that combines features of partnership and corporate structure; Doug Seaman Decorating, LLC was formed in 2013 with help from Tanay Hill, of Huntington Bank’s Garrettsville office and has a learn-as-you-go attitude toward business, a philosophy of hiring quality workers and a commitment to giving back to the community, developing  and deserving trust.  Doug Seaman Decorating, LLC is a prime example of how a skilled tradesman can fit into the larger economy and support family and community prosperity.

Also making a presentation was Colleen Steele, head teller at the Middlefield Bank and a member in good standing of the Garrettsville Silver Creek Garden Club.  Wearing the latter hat, she invited the Rotarians to be a part of the community  photo calendar being offered by the Garden Club to finance the flower baskets hanging from streetlights throughout the village.  The opportunity to give the community advance notice of regularly-scheduled events such as the Reverse Raffle (November 19th  this year, coming soon; get your tickets) and Family Week (2015, February), even regular meeting days at Cal’s II was too good to pass up.

Personal invitations to the upcoming Reverse Raffle have gone out to state and local officials of every stripe to be a part of the evening coming soon.  Members need to turn in tickets and payments as they go

Tom Collins reported on the progress –and success—of a local re-imagine and rebuild Garrettsville project focusing on the Headwaters Trail as a development focus for health and well-being as well as the local economy.  The District(6630) and local clubs have chimed in for matching funds; plans are in the works!

Further discussion bubbled up  concerning the possibility of having a Community Giving Christmas  Tree on the open space downtown, possibly in conjunction with the People Tree.  More to come.

Roadside Clean-up of State Route 82 between Garrettsville and Hiram will be on Saturday, October 25 (a busy day all around); any volunteers should meet at 9:00 at the Carlisle barn at the bottom of the hill.  Lunch will be at McDonald’s.  Y’ all come, now.

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Hiram – The renowned folk ensemble Harmonia will present a free concert at Hiram College on Saturday, October 25 at 7:30 p.m.  Location is Frohring Recital Hall, 11746 Dean Street.  Harmonia plays the traditional music of Eastern Europe, ranging from the Danube to the Carpathians.  Its repertoire reflects the cultures of the region:  Hungarian, Slovak, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croatian, and Gypsy.  The ensemble’s performances on authentic folk instruments evoke the full range of human emotions, interspersing fiery, passionate virtuosity with soulful melancholy and nostalgic yearning.

The ensemble uses instruments as varied as accordion, upright bass, violin, panflute, and cimbalom (the East-European 125 string hammered dulcimer).  The musicans come from varied backgrounds, finding a common musical language in Harmonia.  SingOut! Magazine called their performance “Brilliant.  Lush.  Dazzling.”  National Public Radio declared the group “a musical gem.”  The group is based in Cleveland but appears widely throughout the U.S. and beyond.

The concert is co-sponsored by the Hiram College Music Department and the Hiram Community Trust.  Further information: dreisbachts@hiram.edu or 330-569-5294.

Garrettsville – The Garfield Stadium was a sea of pink Friday night as the G-men football team held a “pink out” night to pay tribute to those who have conquered breast cancer, those who are conquering the disease and those who lost the battle prior to the Mogadore-G-men game.

Earlier in the season, several of the football moms decided that since so many of the players families were touched by the disease, they would pay tribute to those family members. They chose October because it is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The group designed a t-shirt and organized the sale of the shirts for the game. The proceeds from the event will be split, with a portion of it going to the Melissa Knight to help with her on-going medical costs as she fights the fight and the remaining portion will go to the junior class. The shirt had a dark pink ribbon on the front laced similar to football lacing that had the slogan “Tackle Cancer” on it. The team sold over 100 pink t-shirts.

Friday night, prior to the game, they honored those who have won the battle, those who are fighting the battle and those who lost the battle by wearing the pink t-shirts and by giving recognition to those family members. The football players then escorted their family member a crossed the field prior to the game.

Those honored were, one year survivors Judy Blewitt, escorted by her grandson, Christopher Blewitt, and Kathie Lutz escorted by her grandson, Kyle Borelli and honorary grandson Christopher Blewitt.   Ante Dejanovic and his dad, Mio honored Ante’s mother and Mio’s wife, Kasenna who lost her battle five years ago. Devin and Dayne Karlovec escorted their grandmother, Rella Hoskins, who is a 30 year survivor, Brad Martin escorted his aunt, Jonnie Manista who just finished chemo, he also honored his grandmother Bonnie Nedelka who lost her battle 14 years ago, Hayden Nichols escorted his grandmother Janet Nichols who is a four year survivor. Chandler Stefanek escorted his grandmother, Pat Stefanek, who is a 20 year survivor, Noah Owens escorted his grandmother, Mary Anne Dunning and lastly, Melissa Knight was escorted by her daughters, Sierra and Alexis Knight, and Dalton Fall. Melissa is currently fighting the disease.

Although the stands and sidelines were a sea of pink, the game was all green as Mogadore defeated the G-Men 49-7.

Garrettsville – Our students continue to perform at amazing levels.  Academically they exceed expectations.  On the latest report card they ranked among the best schools in the region. Our sixth graders set a JAG record as 92% passed the state reading test.  Eighth grade students also set a JAG record with 95.8% passing the state reading test. Our seventh graders also set JAG records in math (90.7%) AND reading (96.3%) on the state tests.  Finally, our fourth graders performed at the highest levels as they achieved 100% passage on their state reading test!

While testing is how the state ranks our schools, our students excel in so many more areas.  For example, JAG High School students earned 102 college credits through dual enrollment and AP courses. Our band continues to impress at band shows across the area, and even performed at the Hiram College Homecoming game!

Our teachers are awesome. Students perform at high levels, but behind every high test score, academic accolade or athletic achievement there is a team of hard working teachers.

Members of our community have come to expect to see and experience excellence from their schools. You have supported our school system, and this support has been crucial to our excellence. This is what we all expect from our students and one another. Great communities are made even stronger with great schools.  We are committed to excellence and will continue to look at ways we can improve.

As I reflect on my first year as the Superintendent of your schools, I am assured our community is the best place to live, work and learn. My expectations match those of our students, staff and community……..excellence in all aspects of what we do!

As always, I invite you to contact me directly in the office (330.527.4336), on my cell (216.534.7413) or by email (tlysiak@jagschools.org) if you ever have any questions or ideas to share.

Go G-Men!

Mantua – While some kids treasure their extra days off school by sleeping in, on NEOEA Day, several kids donned  rubber boots, joined their families to hunt for treasures in the heart of Mantua Village. At Mantua’s Buchert Park (4800 East High Street), the group met Ryan Moss from the Ohio Division of Natural Resources. Moss donned his waders to enter the river, showing firsthand some of the hidden treasures that can be found in a typical Cuyahoga River monitoring exercise.

First, Moss used a Turbidity Tube — a narrow PVC tube roughly two feet long — to show participants how to measure the river’s water clarity. Looking through the side of the tube, the water appeared remarkably clear. But changing perspective and looking through the top of the tube, participants realized that because of sediment, the bottom was hidden, just as the river’s bottom is hidden from view. Moss’s next step, however, shed plenty of light on some of the interesting creatures that call the Crooked River home. And while the depth and current of the river made it impossible for the children, mostly third graders from Crestwood Intermediate School, to enter the river, Moss brought some of the river to them.

Moss used two plastic shoebox-sized bins as mini aquariums, which he filled with river water. Taking a three-foot section of netting, Moss entered the river and used his feet to jostle the rocks resting on the river’s bottom, sending its former occupants into the waiting net. After carefully closing the net, Moss exited the river, opening the net flat so that the group could locate critters, examine them, and place them into the waiting bins. Hidden among the fall leaves, participants found crayfish, a multitude of insect larvae, tiny freshwater clams and a water penny beetle. Moss and a team of volunteers monitor the Cuyahoga in various locations during early spring, summer and fall to test water quality of the river by the variety of creatures found within it. According to Moss, the river quality at Buchert Park rated excellent that day.

After releasing their treasures back into the river, participants followed Rosemary Krupar, CIS third grade teacher and Teacher-Ranger-Teacher for Cuyahoga Valley National Park, down the nearby Headwaters Trail to investigate the Oak Ridge Trail. The boisterous group startled a snake sunning itself along the trail as they identified leaves, explored the woods, and enjoyed the crisp fall day.

Nature Treks is a free extracurricular program to provide outdoor education to Crestwood students and their families. During several sessions throughout the 2014-2015 school year, families will meet at various sites in the area for interactive nature experiences. These sessions take place on select weekdays when school is not in session. For more information on upcoming Nature Treks, contact Rosemary Krupar at Crestwood Intermediate School, rkrupar@crestwoodschools.org.

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Is there a threat of Ebola in Portage County?

• Stay calm. Portage County has NO cases of Ebola, and the threat of Ebola virus transmission in Portage County is extremely low.

• At this time, because the nurse who tested positive for Ebola visited Summit County on October 10-13, Summit County Public Health is conducting the communicable disease investigations with people she contacted during her visit.

• After preliminary investigation, SCPH has not identified any public events or large public gatherings attended by the affected healthcare worker in Summit County, Portage County, or any other surrounding counties.

• It appears as though the healthcare worker who has Ebola had limited social contact outside of a small number of family and friends.

• There is no need to close schools or cancel events.

Is there a threat of Ebola at Kent State University?

• Stay calm. There are NO cases of Ebola on KSU Campus.

• The nurse who tested positive for Ebola did not visit KSU during her visit.

• Three family members who had contact with the nurse who tested positive for Ebola work in administrative services at Kent State University, and staff members in those departments have been briefed. The three employees do not teach in the classroom and have little or no contact with students.

• The identity of the employees will remain confidential to protect their privacy.

• They have not reported any symptoms. Out of an abundance of caution, KSU has asked the three employees to remain off campus for the next 21 days and self-monitor per the CDC protocol.

• Classes are not cancelled. All KSU buildings remain open. Regular campus activities, including Homecoming, will continue as planned.

Can you tell me more about Ebola infection?

• Ebola is a rare and potentially deadly disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus strains.

• Ebola is spread by touching the blood and bodily fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of a person who is sick with blood and bodily fluids on it like clothes and bedding.Ebola is not spread through the air, food, or water.

• Patients are contagious only when they are symptomatic and show signs of a fever. Symptoms include:

o fever (greater than 100.4 F)
o diarrhea
o severe headache
o vomiting
o muscle pain
o stomach pain
o weakness
o unexplained bleeding or bruising

• Coughing and sneezing are not symptoms of Ebola. They are symptoms of the common cold or a respiratory virus, such as the flu.

• Anyone believing that they have been in contact with a person with Ebola should contact their health care provider.

• There is no FDA-approved vaccine or medicine to treat Ebola. However, treatment can be offered for symptom management, such as keeping the patient hydrated, maintaining normal oxygen and blood pressure, and treating other infections as they occur.

What can I do to make sure I don’t catch Ebola?

• Ebola is spread through direct contact with blood and bodily fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of an infected and symptomatic person. Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for 30-60 seconds.

• Do not handle items that may have come in contact with blood and bodily fluids.

• Seek medical care immediately if you develop a fever (greater than 100.4 F), severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, and unexplained bleeding or bruising and have had contact with someone who has been diagnosed with Ebola.

What is Portage County doing to respond to Ebola?

• The local health departments have been working with community partners for years to plan a strongly coordinated community response to public health emergencies. The Incident Command Structure, including the Joint Information Center (TIC), is an efficient and well-planned way to prepare for and respond to public health and safety concerns.

• In response to the public health concern of Ebola, the Joint Information Center, or JIC, has been activated in Portage County. This means designated Information Officers at several community agencies come together to ensure we are communicating effectively between agencies and with the public about Ebola. This group also ensures that local residents, families, healthcare providers, and first responders have the most up-to-date information about Ebola.

• The JIC includes: PCHD, Kent City Health Department (KCHD), Portage County Emergency Management Agency (EMA), Robinson Memorial Hospital, and Kent State University. In addition, the partners are engaged in the following activities:
• Kent City Health Department: Because the area of highest concern in Portage County is Kent State University, Kent City Health Department is working diligently to resolve any issues of concern in that jurisdiction.

• Portage County Health Department is fully engaged in monitoring the health status of its residents and is working closely with KCHD and Ohio Department of Health in this regard.

• Portage County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) has activated their staff to monitor the Ebola situation.

• Robinson Memorial Hospital is taking extensive precautions to protect staff and increase readiness to care for potential Ebola exposure or confirmed cases.

• KSU University Health Services has activated its internal Incident Command Structure on a small scale.

What else is being done outside of Portage County?

• As of October 15, Ohio Department of Health has activated its Ebola preparedness plan.

• As of October 15, Summit County Public Health has activated its Incident Command Structure (ICS).

Because the nurse who tested positive for Ebola in Dallas on October 14 visited Summit County on October 10-13, SCPH is conducting the communicable disease investigations with people she contacted during her visit.

Where can I get more information?

• Call Summit County Public Health’s Ebo1a information line at 330-926-3939, or call Ohio Department of Health’s Ebola call center at 1-866-800-1404.

• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: www.cdc.gov/ebola.

• Ohio Department of Health at www.odh.gov/.

• Portage County Health Department at www.co.portage.oh.us/healthdepartmenthtm.

• Kent City Health Department at www.kentpublichealth.org.

• “Like” Portage Prepares on Facebook and Twitter for updates.


PORTAGE COUNTY LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS

JOINT COMMAND TEAM

Hiram – Justin Lonis is the founder of Justimagine, LLC, located in his hometown of Mentor, OH. The company’s first product is the Advanced Balance Board, which was developed by Lonis as a senior project while he was still a student at Hiram College. The idea was born after Lonis, a 6’6” basketball forward at Hiram College, injured his ankle. Essentially, his design consists of a balance platform with an LCD display that shows the number of touches, or times the platform tips, in a given time period. His innovative product aids in lower body stability testing, ankle stability, and rehabilitation. A recent Hiram College graduate, Lonis won first place in the Entrepreneurs’ Organization’s Global Student Entrepreneur Awards (GSEA) this month.

His idea and resulting business plan earned first place at Hiram’s IdeaBuild Competition, and third place at the regional competition. He earned first place at the GSEA in Cleveland. Following his mom’s advice, he is trying to retain as much equity in his company as possible. He’s currently in the prototype phase of his invention — or as he stated, “It’s more selling a dream than a product.” He estimates that the prototype is 90% complete, and he plans to show a completed prototype at the next round of competition in early November. Potential users of his product include orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists, and athletic trainers.

As a part of the Cleveland competition, Lonis was thrilled to be a part of the sold-out Thrive event, sponsored by the Cleveland Entrepreneurs’ Organization earlier this month. The event featured Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak. “Just being in the competition gave me access to over 300 entrepreneurs. The insights they provided made it the most valuable experience for me.” It also gave Lonis the chance to play Air Combat — co-piloting an actual fighter plane flying over Lake Erie — and manning the controls during simulated dogfights. “It’s the coolest thing I’ve ever done!” he beamed. Lonis reinvested his prize winnings into his company, and will move on to compete in the US Nationals in Chicago next month. A victory in Chicago would qualify Justin for a chance at the title of Global Student Entrepreneur of the Year (GSEA) in April 2015 in Washington, DC.

Justimagine, LLC currently holds three USPTO provisional patents and has working relationships with local area colleges, hospitals, sports teams and entrepreneurial agencies. More advanced versions of the initial product may be used to help quantitatively diagnose concussions. But Lonis admits that his biggest challenge is simplifying his “elevator pitch” — the 30-second summary of his product for potential investors or buyers of his product. “It’s a huge challenge for me. My goal is to break it down in a way that even my eight-year-old brother, Mikey can understand.”

The GSEA (Global Student Entrepreneur Awards) is a global competition hosted by the Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) for students who own and operate businesses while attending high school or college. During the competitions, nominees like Justin compete against their peers from around the world. With more than 1,700 competitors from more than 20 countries, EO GSEA is an awesome opportunity for student entrepreneurs to make connections, find resources, and grow their businesses.

The Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is a global network of more than 10,000 business owners in 46 countries. They strive to inspire students to entrepreneurship by showcasing undergraduate business owners through the Global Student Entrepreneur Awards (GSEA).

Twentieth Century Club met Thursday October 2 at the Garrettsville Library with Lucy Galadye as hostess.

Members were asked to bring a sample of something they collect. Samples included wooden boxes (one for embalming fluid) – no coffins. Angels were collected for the guidance and protection they represent. There were rocks, including old Alaskan quartz.

Christmas collections contained “The Night Before Christmas” books, musical boxes and mugs and  Old World Santas (Pipka). There were collections of ducks and birds, some by Lenox and Jim Shore. There were Hummels and Precious Moments figurines, and, of course, Jane Bell collects bells.

Someone collects paper weights and another, fabric quilt squares (no quilt, just square). Another member collects kitchen tools with red handles.

The program brought up memories of collections some had forgotten they had. As one member so aptly stated, “It was a charming and unique program.”

The next meeting will be at the home of Jane Bell on October 16th. Members are asked to bring a package of diapers to give to “Safer Futures.”

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The International Soap Box Derby and Western Reserve Public Media have entered into an agreement to expand educational offerings through the Derby’s STEM education based Gravity Racing Challenge® Program.

The Derby’s GRC education program uses the tools and values of Soap Box Derby® racing to introduce Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) to students in an enjoyable, engaging way. The program is designed to provide K-12 educators and students with project- and standards-based, inter-curricular learning opportunities.

“We’re excited to partner with Western Reserve Public Media,” said Derby President & CEO Joe Mazur. “The GRC program has grown the past few years and now it’s time to take it to a new level. With this partnership we’ll now be able to provide educators with a learning portal that meets today’s educational standards.”

The Educational Services staff at Western Reserve Public Media will use the Soap Box Derby theme to develop a kit of resources and activities that link to Ohio Department of Education standards for fifth graders. Following STEM standards, the project will include videos, lesson plans, activities, background resources, assessments and professional development opportunities. Barbara Moore of Western Reserve Public Media will serve as grant program manager for the project.

“We are happy to have been chosen to partner with International Soap Box Derby on this project,” said Jeff Good, director of education at Western Reserve Public Media. “For years, we have specialized in developing educational resources that satisfy mandated educational standards. For this project, we will create a learning portal that will lead a teacher through 20 days of instruction in meeting a series of educational standards. In addition, we will work with the Soap Box Derby staff to produce educational kits that will be available for purchase by school districts in March 2015.”

Garrettsville - The week leading up to homecoming is always an exciting week as the student council held spirit week with various themes. Monday’s theme was camouflage, Tuesday was tie-dyed, Wednesday was class t-shirts, Thursday was pink for breast cancer awareness and Friday was black and gold. Besides the themed days, they had a bonfire night, hall-decorating contest, fence decorating contest, and float-decorating for the parade.

Friday night’s festivities began when the parade stepped –off at 4:30 followed by the coronation of the King Evan Beach and Queen Sara Petrie at the game.  The band was not left out of the festivities. The Marching Pride was joined by the 8th grade band and the alumni band members, boosting their numbers to 170 marchers as they performed the half-time show before a record crowd. The combined band played many of the band’s favorites like the “Garfield Fight Song,” “Cleveland Rocks,” “The Hey Song,” and “Land of a 1000 Dances,” bringing back memories for many of the alumni in attendance. The G-men came up short in the game, giving the Pirates a 13-7 win.

The class winners were as follows: Hall decorating, and float decorating went to the senior class, the junior class won the fence decorating, the sophomore class was declared the overall spirit week winner by having the largest percentage of their class participating in the class shirt day, pink for breast cancer awareness day and for black and gold day. The freshman class won the camouflage day.

The week-long festivities were capped-off by the “Winter in New York” themed dance Saturday night.

Geauga County – When preparing for the 60th season of the Geauga Lyric Theater Guild, a decision was made to highlight some of the shows from the past decades. Last performed at GLTG in 1978 and 2001 under the older title, “Ten Little Indians”, “And Then There Were None” has always been a popular title by Agatha Christie.

“And Then There Were None” is the classic mystery of  ten strangers called together in a mansion on an island, only to be anonymously accused of murder, and then begin to die, one by one.  Energetic and bubbly director Debbie Cluts challenges the actors to go beyond their comfort zone, to bring their characters alive.  Previously a part of the Great Lakes Shakespeare Festival, Cluts is new to GLTG as a main stage director. She has worked in the GLTG summer workshop program, directing last year’s “Dragon Tales”.

The cast is a comfortable mix of Geauga Theater regulars and brand-new actors to our stage, with some of the people traveling from Strongsville and Lakewood. One of our teen actors, making the transition into adult roles, finds it very enjoyable. “I love the combination of our light-hearted cast and dark-humored show. It brings a captivating energy to rehearsals which I’m certain will only grow as we near performance time”, says Halle Blados, who will be playing the role of Vera. “The intricate details that Agatha Christie put into her characters and story are masterful, and the build of tension in each progressing scene is intense. Whether you’ve never seen the play or have seen it twenty times, anyone who wants a chilling mystery— especially in time for Halloween— will find everything they want within “And Then There Were None”.

Reservations for And Then There Were None are being taken now. Join us in our 60th anniversary season at Geauga Lyric Theater! Thanks to our Marquee sponsor, H&R Block.

The Geauga Lyric Theater is located at 101 Water Street on the historic Chardon Square.  For more information or to purchase tickets go towww.geaugatheater.org or call 440-286-2255.

Columbus Day reduced the ranks of   Garrettsville-Hiram Rotarians but the Rotary spirit carried on.  Discussions covered the following topics :

*Dictionaries are here to be distributed on Thursday to third graders at James A. Garfield Elementary

*The organization needs to update and improve its presence on digital media.  To that end, G-H Rotary will be trying out the services of “ClubRunner”, a commercial operation that has a base integrated with Rotary International and the capabilities to handle photos and directories, planning and calendars and much more.  The investment could help broaden local appeal as well as promoting outreach and connectivity.

*The possibility of a Cash Mob/Flash Mob inviting the fifty-three clubs of District 6630 to come to Garrettsville for the Christmas Walk sponsored by the James A. Garfield Historical Society on the first two weekends of November could be a real boost to the local economy and spirit.  The horses will be there for rides around town, on November 8 and November 15—Thank you, Sam, thank you, Pete.  Diners will want to scope out the possibilities. Entrepreneurs will want to scope out the opportunities of coming to a historic village making a comeback.

*The Reverse Raffle is rolling.  Anyone interested in being a sponsor or donor for the occasion should contact Trish Danku or any other Rotarian to get in on the good karma…and good advertising.  Tickets are available now; get your table companions NOW, look for a good time with a great bunch.

*Tom Collins gave an update on the application for a district matching grant focusing on the enhancement and promotion of the Headwaters Trail as a community asset for health and  economic activity.  Looking good…specifics are working their way through the planning stages.

*Ideas concerning a Community Christmas Tree downtown at the Chic & Shabby lot or the Buckeye Block space are being floated.  Things will begin to sort themselves out when there is more input.

Things are happening in Rotary.  Join them at noon on Monday at Cal’s II in Sky Plaza.

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Ravenna – Robinson Memorial Hospital has taken steps to have the entire emergency and case management departments’ workers go through specialized training and role-playing scenarios to best treat patients with mental health issues.

“Dealing with people who have behavioral issues can be challenging, stated Sharon Hissom, lieutenant, Police and Protective Services. “The patient can be calm to combative. With training, direct care staff (emergency department and case management) can learn techniques to de-escalate the patient before their behavior escalates and other types of intervention are needed.”

Bringing a training course to Robinson Memorial was a project of Lieutenant Sharon Hissom of Robinson Memorial Hospital Police and Protective Services and Darla Andrews, Occupations Development. Every one of the officers on staff at Robinson Memorial goes through crisis intervention team training, a 40-hour training course offered through the Portage County Sheriff’s Office. When the officers went through the training this year, Lieutenant Hissom thought it would be beneficial to bring back a similar training to the hospital staff.

The de-escalation training provided by Robinson Memorial is a combination of the crisis intervention team training that the officers undergo at the Sheriff’s Office and CPI (Crisis Prevention Institute) training, which the hospital already provides to its employees.

Besides class discussions, employees will have real live scenarios in how to handle patient situations. Actors from the Kent State University theatre program will act out scenarios while staff de-escalates the situation. Staff will experience patients who are dealing with mental issues. Members of the community and the Mental Health and Recovery Board will also attend the training to observe the interactions.

“It’s one thing to talk about what to do in certain situations; it’s a whole different learning event when what you are taught needs to be put into action,” stated Hissom. “The actors dress the part and never fall out of character. Because these actors are not known to staff, the role play is taken very seriously. Another simulation activity places the staff members in a scenario where they actually hear voices speaking in their ears as they attempt to complete assignments and answer questions. The goal is to enhance understanding and compassionate care for individuals experiencing behavioral issues and to decrease the risk of injury for all.”

Courses began October 1 and will run through November 20.

Garrettsville - Students at James A. Garfield Middle School attended an assembly to hear about the life and legacy of Rachel Scott, the first victim of the Columbine Tragedy.  Rachel’s Challenge exists to equip and inspire individuals to replace acts of violence, bullying, and negativity with acts of respect, kindness, and compassion. Rachel’s Challenge is based on the life and writings of Rachel Joy Scott who was the first victim of the Columbine school shootings in 1999. Through her example, Rachel’s Challenge is making a positive impact in the lives of millions of people every year. Superintendents, principals, teachers, parents, and students bring Rachel’s Challenge into their schools because of escalating problems such as: bullying, student isolation, teen suicide, discrimination, school violence, and increased disciplinary actions. Through powerful presentations, trainings, community events, and professional development, Rachel’s Challenge provides the sustainable solution. Rachel’s inspiring story provides a simple, yet powerful example of how small acts of kindness and acceptance motivate us to consider our relationships with the people we come in contact with every day. Rachel’s Challenge renews our hope that our life has meaning and purpose. Rachel’s story gives us permission to start our own chain reaction of kindness and compassion, which positively affects the climate in our schools and community.  Following the assembly, students gathered at lunch to sign a banner to Accept the 5 Challenges:

• Look for the Best in Others

• Dream Big

• Choose Positive Influences

• Speak with Kindness

• Start your own Chain Reaction

Mantua – Miller’s of Mantua celebrated their grand opening this past weekend when husband and wife team Jason and Nicole Miller opened their new restaurant on East Prospect Street. The Miller’s new restaurant is located in the space previously occupied by Jake’s Eats. In a nod to the previous owners, the new Miller’s menu features some previous customer favorites, including the Jake’s Plate at breakfast, and the Jake’s Salad and Jake’s Club on the lunch and dinner menus. But they’ve added their own spin with daily specials like Tuesday’s pasta night and a Friday fish fry.

Facebook friend Yvonne shared, “different name but same delicious food,” while Claudette added, “great place to meet up with friends.” In addition to providing daily good food and a great place to meet, Millers also became good neighbors, collecting non-perishable foods for the 4Cs food cupboard throughout their Grand Opening weekend.

Miller’s of Mantua is open Tuesday through Sunday — visit them on Facebook or at millersofmantua.com for hours, daily specials, and events.

Mantua – This October 25th, millions of volunteers across the nation will unite to improve the lives of others as a part of Make a Difference Day. That same day, volunteers in Mantua will be working together with the Downtown Mantua Revitalization Corporation (DMRC) locally, as a part of this national program. USA Today Weekend and the Points of Light organization created this largest national day of community service over 20 years ago, and although Make a Difference Day has been taking place each October, this is the first year for a special workday in Mantua Village.

During that Saturday from 8:30 am until 3 pm, volunteers will be repainting street stanchions, weeding & trimming flower gardens, sweeping sidewalks & removing leaves and litter to help beautify Mantua. Volunteers from Crestwood High School’s Senior Seminar group have already signed up. Residents, service clubs, and others are also invited to join in.

From 11:45 – 12:30, volunteers are invited to take a break and enjoy lunch at the nearby Glacial Esker Trail, where Portage Park District staff will share information about the trail. Parking is available at the Mantua Water Treatment Plant on Line Street and Mats Road, off of Orchard Road. The talk is sponsored by Portage Park District and Mantua McDonald’s.

You can help make a difference, too. Gather a group of family or friends and make plans to help DMRC support Mantua on Saturday, October 25th. For more information on this program, contact Greg at (330) 274-0218 or DMRCemail@gmail.com, or visit makeadifferenceday.com and search for the ‘Mantua Means More!’ project.

Garrettsville – On Saturday, October 11th the Daisies of Girl Scout Troop 90206 learned valuable lessons in community service, fundraising, and salesmanship by selling pumpkins which were donated by J.A. Garfield alum Dennis Pochedly.

The girls, and their parents, raised $556 for the #GarrettsvilleStrong fund in only five hours! The remaining pumpkins were donated to the Nelson-Garrettsville Community Cupboard.

On Sunday, $402.26 was raised for the fund by customers taking part in the Streetsboro Chipotle fundraising event. Thank you to everyone who supported these great fundraising events.

Windham – The Windham Village council met on September 22, 2014 with all council members in attendance. Mayor Rob Donham called the meeting to order and gave the guests an opportunity to address council. All of the guests preferred to wait until the end of the meeting before addressing council.

Council approved the fire, police and safety report, the minutes and the financial report before moving on to the lease/ purchase of new police vehicles.  A discussion on the lease /purchase of three new vehicles was held with two of the council members unsure if the lease/ purchase is technically considered a true emergency. They also questioned the need for three vehicles. The mayor reminded council that salt will be seven times more expensive than in previous years and they will be using a lot less of it. Therefore, all-wheel drive vehicles will be necessary to get around. One council member did agree that is would save on gas since the new vehicles have V-6 engines rather than V-8 engines in the cruisers they currently have. They also noted that there would be less money going out for repairs as well. A vote was taken, with one member voting against the measure. The council member who voted against the measure thought two vehicles would suffice. The lease /purchase option of the three vehicles has the village paying $30,000 a year for four years and $1 for the fifth year if they choose to purchase the vehicles at the end of the lease.

In other safety news, council appointed their village representative to the fire board. They voted to have resident Jim Moore represent their residents’ interests on the WFVD Joint Fire Board.

A long discussion on Ordinance O-2014-18 was held. This ordinance is to revise and amend the Windham utility code and adjust water rates for purchase of water from the village and declaring an emergency. This change would allow families who use large quantities of water,(6000 – 12,000 gallons a month) a rate reduction. There are approximately 70 household in the village that this affects. Mayor Rob Donham says this would save those families about $15/ month. The mayor claimed that many times this usage is due to car washing, lawn watering or hosting guests during the summer months. Council members not in favor of the rate reduction stated that for years the single person households paid more than their share of the water bills due to a minimum usage requirement that was once in effect. Now they have eliminated the minimum usage it is now a more fair way of billing and they object to giving large users a break. One council person wanted to know why they should reward those who use more water rather than reward those who choose to conserve water. A vote was taken and five of the six council members voted against giving large users a rate reduction.

In parks and recreation, council approved the appointment of Chris Collins to the Parks and Recreation Committee. They also approved  spending of , no more than $15,000 from the revolving loan fund to move and install playground equipment at the park. The equipment must be installed to the new safety mandates which are quite labor intensive and costly.

A resident questioned zoning policies and also asked why nothing has been done about an on- going problem in her neighborhood. Mayor Rob Donham will look into the problem. Another resident questioned what the plans were for the $676,000 in the sewer fund. $250,000 is planned for upgrades and $30,000 for capital improvement. Another resident in attendance inquired about when they would start campaigning for the Parks and Recreation Levy. The answer given was soon. The same resident wanted to know how much of the funds from that levy would be spent on the community center. The response was that $5,000-10,000 of the levy monies will be spent on the center. It was estimated that it would take $25,000 to get the community center up and running again. Then, it will take about $5000-10,000 a year for maintenance of the facility.

Lastly, another resident questioned when they expected to be in the new facility they bought last year. Mayor Rob Donham responded with spring 2015. Council approved the purchase of the building in October 2013 and made the first payment in January 2014 and as of yet do not have architect drawings for the renovation of the facility. The mayor expects the drawings soon.

The next scheduled meeting will be held on November 25, 2014 at 7 pm in council chambers.

Mantua - A special meeting preceded September’s regular Council meeting. The public meeting provided a forum for village residents to find out more about the street improvement levy, which will be on the ballot in November. The meeting gave residents the opportunity to ask questions of the mayor and council, and to voice their concerns about the state of the village’s streets and roads. If you missed that meeting, you’ll have another opportunity  — another public forum on the street improvement levy will be held at 6 pm on Tuesday, October 21st, prior to that evening’s regular council meeting. According to Downtown Mantua Revitalization Corporation (DMRC) member Sue Steinberg, “It’s imperative that this passes. It’s just so necessary.”

Next, Greg Balbierz, also from DMRC, presented Mayor Linda Clark and Council with a proposal for DMRC participation in the national Make a Difference Day effort on Saturday, October 25th. Council approved the project, through which volunteers from the DMRC, Crestwood High School, and the greater Mantua area will join with others to repaint street stanchions and generally spruce up Downtown Mantua. Individuals and groups are invited to join the effort. For more information, visit the Mantua Matters project page at makeadifferenceday.com.

Similarly, Eagle Scout candidate Dan O’Sickey finalized his plans with Council to place two large benches on Village-owned land near the Esker and Buckeye Trails. Village Administrator David Akerley worked with Mr. O’Sickey to determine exact placement of the benches, which were installed at the end of September.

Later, Mayor Clark announced that two individuals would be sworn in at council’s October meeting on October 21st. Wes Hawkins will join the Planning Committee while Ashley Hawkins will join both the Parks and Shade Tree Committees. In addition, the village has a position open in the Service Department, with several promising candidates who have expressed an interest.

On behalf of the Fire Board, Bill Zoller reported that the MSFD new squad is in service, and that the department received a good trade-in value for the old squad. The department now has 3 squads in service. Mr. Zoller also reported that the temporary station has been set up north of the bridge closure, and is working well. He noted that the additional cost to man two stations during the road closure is estimated at $50,000.

Lastly, candidate for Common Pleas Judge Becky Doherty introduced herself to the group. “Heroin is an epidemic,” remarked Ms. Doherty. “It’s not an inner city problem — it’s all our problem, and it affects our kids, our friend’s kids, and our grandkids,” she concluded. Doherty served as a Trial attorney for 21 years, and as Chief Criminal Prosecutor in Mahoning County, as well. If elected, Ms. Doherty plans to implement a Drug Court in Portage County, similar to the one in Mahoning County, to combat the growing heroin problem in the area.

The next regular meeting of the Mantua Village Council will be held at 7 pm on Tuesday, October 21st. The meeting will be preceded at 6 pm by a Town Hall meeting regarding the upcoming street improvement levy, which will be on the ballot for village residents in November. Residents are strongly encouraged to attend this informative meeting.

Garrettsville – On Wednesday, October 1st, Rich Hoffman from Sky Plaza IGA presented the Nelson Garrettsville Community Cupboard with $500 worth of IGA Gift Cards to help those in need this holiday season.

In addition, IGA also presented the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce with a donation of $312.50 for #GarrettsvilleStrong which was  raised by the IGA bottled water fundraiser they held this summer.

Nelson Twp. – Residents and spectators packed the Nelson Community House on Wednesday,  October 1st for the first trustee meeting of the month, and open forum for those wishing to make their opinions about the Nelson Quarry Park known. All trustees and officials were present and accounted for. Also in attendance was Portage County Sheriff David Doak, and township legal counsel Christopher Meduri.

Dave Finney presented the board of trustees with the minutes from the previous meeting. The minutes were approved as presented in a motion made by Matota and seconded by Elias. The trustees were also provided with documentation for bills and wages totaling $94,811.83. Finney informed the trustees that the Board of Elections has informed the township that a polling place must be made available November 4th. The long-awaited warranty for the salt barn was also received. Elias made a motion to pay the bills and wages as presented, seconded by Leonard. Discussion followed regarding contracted work on the chip and seal projects. Matota indicated that he has no problem paying the contractor, but wanted to make sure it was documented that some of their work was less than professional. Elias will work with Vanek to draft a letter to send to the contractor.

Cmunt reported that a resident wanted to be able to sell merchandise out of the Community House. Finney mentioned that he believes there is a commercial rental rate, and that the Community House could be rented if they are willing to pay the rate. Finney will follow up with Cmunt.

Leonard reported that Route 88 is scheduled to reopen October 2nd, and that the old salt barn will be used by the fire department for training purposes. The structure will eventually be demolished after a demolition permit must be applied for, and asbestos inspection is performed.

Chris Sanchez of Community EMS, spoke briefly about the upcoming renewal levy for the EMS District. The issue on the ballot is NOT a new tax, it is a renewal that would continue the existing levy at the existing rate.

Kicking off the discussion about the Quarry Park, Leonard read through the various calls received by emergency services/law enforcement. These calls include: Submerged Vehicles; Assault; Traffiking; Fraud; Theft; Unruly Persons; Trespassing; Robbery; Indecent Exposure; Suicide; Criminal Trespassing; and Drug Possession. Elias was asked to provide some background on the evenings open forum‚ –  topic du jour‚ – whether the concerts held at the park are a public nuisance. The current owners purchased it in 1997, however the Quarry Park itself  has been around for about 60 years. The current property owners reside in Newbury, Ohio. The park is officially a commercial campground. Elias reiterated several times that the concerns were not about the park, but rather the concerts. At the previous meeting, the operator Evan Kelley, stated that he “lost control” of the Machine Gun Kelly concert, a statement that troubled Elias. The trustees made it clear that the topic was being address due to the number of complaints Elias and Leonard have received over the concerts.

Following the opening statements about the desired focus and scope of the commentary, the trustees turned the floor over to the audience, providing two minutes per person.

For the remainder of the meeting the trustees heard commentary in support of the the Quarry Park’s concerts, as well as several complaints about them. Ultimately Meduri suggested that the trustees put together a list of changes they would like to see from the  Quarry Park, and submit them to the owner’s legal counsel; a suggestion that most of the trustees seemed to agree with. Some residents in attendance were, understandably, upset with the outcome of the meeting  –  a feeling compounded by Matota’s decision to get into a loud argument with them during the closing minutes of the discussion. Matota loudly asserted that he has “never received a phone call yet complaining about anything.” He continued by stating “We cannot please everybody. If there are so many people who are against the park, where are they tonight?”  He encouraged anyone who has an issue in the township to call him at 330-527-2258.  “Call it any time! I don’t care if it’s one o’clock in the morning or three  o’clock in the morning, you call me and I will be on your steps in fifteen minutes!” proclaimed Matota.

Following Matota’s commentary the meeting was brought back to order, the trustees signed the checks for bills and wages. The meeting was adjourned afterward.

Rocky River  – Prayers from Maria Children’s Glioma Cancer Foundation announced today that it will award its $250,000 Melana Matson Memorial Grant—its third major research grant since 2010—to Case Western Reserve University, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers James Basilion, PhD, Efstathis Karathanasis, PhD, and John Letterio, MD, who are studying the use of nanotechnology to more effectively treat pediatric glioma brain tumors.

“We are tremendously happy to award this grant to the research team at Case,” said Ed McNamara, foundation president and co-founder. “When Maria was diagnosed with a brain stem glioma back in 2006, we quickly learned how little was being done for these children and how treatments for these types of tumors had not advanced in almost 40 years. This research brings us one step closer to the development of more targeted and less toxic treatment strategies.” Megan McNamara, co-founder, added “We are especially excited to have partnered with Friends of Melana, started by Norm and Joyce Fashing in honor of their granddaughter Melana Matson, to raise these critical funds. I can’t think of a better way to honor the memories of Maria and Melana than to help bring more effective and promising treatments to children battling gliomas.”

“Pediatric therapies often follow the oversimplified assumption that children are just smaller people,” said Efstathios Karathanasis, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering and Radiology at CWRU. “We now know that scaling down the dose of existing drugs will not achieve eradication of this lethal disease, so this award from Prayers from Maria provides us with the opportunity to develop a therapeutic agent specifically for children battling gliomas.

Working with a collaborative team of researchers with complementary expertise – in this case – cancer nanotechnology, pediatric oncology and molecular pharmacology – holds great promise,” stated Karathanasis.

“We are excited to be associated with the Prayers from Maria Foundation,” said James Basilion, Professor, Radiology, Biomedical Engineering at CWRU. “There are almost no funding opportunities for childhood brain tumors, yet the impact on these children and families is huge. I am excited that Ed and Megan have taken up this cause and I think that the group will drive forward research for this disease. We have worked as a team at Case for quite some time, and what has emerged is an ability to treat tumors more effectively with fewer side effects, which fulfills the unmet clinical need for childhood brain tumors. We are grateful to have the opportunity to apply this technology to childhood brain tumors,” said Basilion.

Currently, pediatric brain tumors are nearly inaccessible with today’s drugs regiments. This stems from the fact that drugs are not specifically designed to consider the uniqueness of pediatric brain tumors. To effectively seek and treat pediatric gliomas, Dr. Karathanasis and his colleagues have designed a new nanoparticle to “smuggle” the drug into these tumors. The nanoparticle, called nanochain, is made of different nanospheres connected one to another in a linear fashion, like the links of a chain. Specifically, the research team links three nanospheres made of iron oxide and one lipid nanosphere filled with drugs. The surface of the nanochain is ‘decorated’ with multiple sites that act like glue to bind explicitly to the blood vessel lining where brain tumors are located. Due to their shape and flexibility, the nanochains possess a unique ability to drift out of the blood stream and home in on cancer markers along the blood vessel walls and adhere to the site. This places the nanochain directly next to the tumor, separated only by the blood vessel wall. Once the nanochains slip from the blood stream and dock onto the blood vessels of gliomas, a mild radio frequency (RF) field is applied outside the body (similar to a FM radio). The field causes the tails of the nanochain to vibrate, breaking open the lipid drug spheres, and creating a rapid release of a free drug capable of spreading throughout the entire tumor site. Preclinical studies have shown that a remarkable 5% of the injected dose accumulates in gliomas compared to current treatment methods that only achieve less than 1% penetration of the dose. As noted by Dr. Karathanasis, “We hope to see promising results like this for the pediatric brain cancers, and funding support from the Prayers from Maria Foundation will make this important research possible.”

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Hiram  – Hiram College will help build bridges between local high schools and their international peers, thanks to a grant from the U.S. Department of State. The program is in collaboration with Case Western Reserve University, The Shoals Marine Laboratory and the Cleveland Metropolitan School District.

The grant, totaling $492,309 for “Public Diplomacy Programs for Afghanistan and Pakistan” is the largest federal grant on record that Hiram College has received.

Through this grant, Cleveland-area and Pakistani high school students and teachers will spend several weeks together in learning communities, exploring ways to address the international water crisis from the ground up. The program, “Connecting Pakistani and American High Schools Through International Watershed Partnerships,” is an international twist on the Igniting Streams of Learning in Science (ISLS) program that Professor of Biology Denny Taylor has coordinated since 2007. The grant will fund the program from October 2014 through May 2016.

“The program is based on the principle that high school students become more connected with themselves, with one another and with the world at large when they explore real-world problems and when their discoveries make a difference,” Taylor said. “Our program calls for the formation of non-traditional partnerships among American and Pakistani high schools, universities, local community partners and government agencies – partnerships that are necessary to solve the unprecedented global water crises of the 21st Century.”

The cohort will spend nine days at Hiram College, five days at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland and five days at Shoals Marine Laboratory in New Hampshire during a summer 2015 institute. Several Hiram College and Pakistani undergraduates will travel with the high school students to each site, as “near peer mentors.”

Robin Singleton ’15, one of the “near peer mentors” for the summer 2014 pilot program that Taylor recently coordinated, said she and the other undergraduates played a valuable role.

“We didn’t just learn the science behind (the water crisis), but the protocols for putting something like this together,” the biology major from York, Pa., said. “And being closer in age (to high school students) than the others involved was beneficial because we have a slightly better understanding of how high school students want to learn, and we can relate to them.”

The undergraduate mentors will also facilitate communication between the Pakistani and American peers once the summer institute is complete.  Before parting ways, the students will put together an action plan that they will teach and model to their peers back home. They will continue to meet virtually through fall and winter 2015 to share success stories and challenges.

The value of the program goes far beyond getting high school students engaged and active in the fresh water crisis; it is a starting point, Taylor said, for “how we think about our relationships with each other and our relationships with the world.”

Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary continues “full speed ahead” toward the big fall event, the Reverse Raffle and Silent Auction coming up at Sugar Bush Golf Club in November.  Sponsors and donors are still welcome; attendees from across the community can begin lining up their tickets now. See any Rotary member.  It’s an enjoyable evening with friends, old and new, and  great food.  Don’t miss it.

Items of business included Lisa Muldowney’s announcement that the Dictionary Project books are in.  They will each be outfitted with a sticker outlining the Four-Way Test and giving the name of the Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club as the dictionary sponsor.  They will be distributed, classroom by classroom, to third graders at Garfield Elementary School as soon as they get their stickers.

The last home soccer game of the season will be on Tuesday; it’s Senior Night and the local Rotary Student Exchange guy in residence, “Zad”, has been part of the team since his arrival, making some major contributions.

The program for the meeting came from member Tanay Hill, of Huntington Bank, who started off with a clever quiz, designed to encourage focused observation by bank personnel and others who might be at the scene of an untoward event at a bank…or anywhere.  Observation  works to protect customers as well as bank employees when situations are out of the ordinary and may need investigation.

Ms Hill has one daughter and graduated from Youngstown State University in 2003 with a degree in accounting; her scholarship from Sky Bank led to her employment there and  when Sky Bank became part of Huntington, there she was.  She started in Warren, has risen through the ranks and has spent 9 years in management.  She is a past president of Business Network International, is involved in Junior Achievement and heads up a team of eight—with many years of experience– at the Garrettsville branch of Huntington Bank.  Her special field of expertise is in business development, which fits well with Huntington’s recognition as a #1 Small Business Administration lender.  Her branch has been a proud supporter of the Friends of Melana organization and is becoming more involved with the Garrettsville Chamber of Commerce.  She asks the right questions and gets good answers

The welcomed guest for lunch was Josh Prest, a regional representative for the state treasurer’s office.  His contribution to discussion was to mention that the Youngstown Business Incubator has recently been ranked #1 in the world.  Rising from the ashes is good for the region and good for the state treasurer’s office

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Windham – An organization that has always been there for those in need, find that they are in need of help themselves.  Their shelves are almost bare. Sandi Fordyce, head of the food pantry at Windham’s Salvation Army said it is a combination of things; the rising cost of food, more folks underemployed, making a larger demand for food, fewer donations etc. Currently, the Salvation Army in Windham serves about 200 families a month.  The Salvation Army generally obtains their food from the Akron Canton Food Bank but as of late, they have had slim pickings and the cost of the healthy food has made it nearly impossible to purchase enough to meet the demand.

The pantry needs our help. Here is what one can do to help, and it is simple. When you grocery shop buy an extra can or two and drop it off at the Renaissance Family Center at 9905 Wil-Verne Dr Windham, Oh 44288. RFC is open Mondays 8am 4 pm, Tuesday 10 am – 6pm, and Thursdays 12pm until 6pm and Fridays 10 – 4 pm. Please state it is for the Salvation Army Food Pantry.  Civic groups, school groups etc could also host food drives to help replenish the shelves. One can also donate cash as well.

The Salvation Army has an account set up at Sparkle in Windham. Monetary donations can be dropped off at Sparkle; tell them it is for the Salvation Army Food Pantry. These monies will be used to buy fresh meat and produce.  Top items they need are, noodles, canned soups, stuffing mix, any canned vegetables, baked beans, Jell-O, and pudding, pancake mix and syrup; just about any canned good is  needed. Wholesome breakfast cereals, peanut butter, and canned meats are also needed. They will accept any nonperishable food that is not outdated.

So let’s help our neighborhood food pantry which is always there when one is in need, so it can continue to be there, when it is needed.

Garrettsville – Don’t miss out on the largest fundraising event of the season. Be there October 25th as Ted  “Leapin’” Lysiak, and the rest of the Garfield Inspectors take on the Harlem Ambassadors in a one-day-only event never before seen in the area. This one-of-a-kind fundraising event pits our local team of Garfield High School alums, teachers, and administration against nationally renown basketball players for two great causes‚ raising funds for the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce’s #GarrettsvilleStrong rebuild fund; and Phase II of the James A. Garfield Stadium Improvement Project.  

Representing the Garfield Inspectors are:

Ted “Leapin’” Lysiak (Garfield Superintendent)

“Big Jim” Pfleger (Garfield Athletic Director)

“Techno” Tom Bartz (GHS/GMS Technology)

Josh”Calculating” Camuso (GHS Math)

Mike “Proton” Paes (GMS Science)

Steve Zivoder (Class of 2009)

Toby Gerez (Class of 2008)

Marcus Roach (Class of 2002)

Jon Daley (Class of 2007)

Cody Berg (Class of 2012)

CJ Carlise (Class of 2009)

Ben Goodknight (Class of 2009)

Bring the whole family to this fun-filled, family-friendly evening of basketball showmanship featuring high-flying slam dunks, ball-handling tricks, and hilarious comedy routines at Garfield High School Gymnasium. Tickets have been affordably priced so you can bring the whole family without breaking the bank.

Pre-sale tickets are available now at area businesses including: The Villager; Charles Auto Family; Miller’s Family Restaurant; Garrettsville DQ Grill & Chill (8013 State St); Second Style and the James A Garfield School offices.

Ticket prices are as follows: Adults‚ $10; Students (12 & Under) $7; Seniors $7; Family 4 Pack (4 Tickets & 2 Bags of Popcorn)  $30. Call 330-527-5761 for ticket information.

Tickets can also be reserved online at garrettsvillearea.com/tix

In addition to the basketball show, attendees will also enjoy a great Chinese Auction, raffles, and more. There will also be a chance to win an autographed basketball, purchase Harlem Ambassadors souvenirs, meet the Harlem Ambassadors during a free post-game autograph session. The Garfield All Sports Boosters will also have snacks and beverages available for purchase throughout the evening.

This event has been brought to you by the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce, Garfield All Sports Boosters, and these sponsors: Charles Auto Family, Ellerhorst Russell Insurance, South Wood Apartments, The Weekly Villager, Villager Printing, Sky Lanes and Fairfield Inn of Streetsboro.

For more information about your Chamber of Commerce please visit GarrettsvilleArea.com

Burton – Autumn is the perfect time of the year to visit Burton Village.  The beauty of fall is never the same from year to year as the hardwood trees explode into an amazing array of colors.  Slower days and starry nights combine for a soothing season before being tucked in for a long winter.

The Burton Chamber of Commerce’s annual fall tradition of an Ox Roast and Ox-Tober Fest will be October 11 & 12 on the Village Green.  The Log Cabin and Green will be the center of the weekend’s activities.   Come enjoy the lush fall foliage while enjoying a delicious ox roast sandwich along with a frothy beer in the beer tent and foot stomping polka music. It will be a celebration of good food, good drink, good people and toe tapping music.

The original German Oktoberfest began with the marriage of the Crown Prince of Bavaria in 1810.  Today, the folk festival observance is linked to the bounty of the harvest and the goodness of creation.   The tradition of a Burton ox roast goes back nearly 60 years when the Burton Volunteer Fire Department began serving the hearty meal as a way to raise funds for new equipment.  It was later passed on to the Burton Chamber of Commerce to continue the fall ritual.

The Chamber will be serving delicious roast (ox) beef sandwiches along with baked beans, coleslaw and dessert until 8 P.M., or sold out.  Later in the afternoon hot dogs and brats will be added to the menu.   All the work is done by an army of volunteers from Burton and the surrounding area and proceeds benefit the Burton area.

Take time to enjoy music in the beer tent.  Saturday from noon to 4 Patty C & the Guys will be playing polkas. From 5 to 8 come rock & roll with the Ted Riser Band.  Tap your toes Sunday from 2 to 6 with button box music from Kathy Hlad and Julie Tabaj.

The celebration begins both days at 10 A.M. The beer tent will be open until 8 P.M.

It may be fall and the maple trees are getting ready for winter, but maple syrup will be flowing in the Log Cabin in the park. Learn how pure maple syrup will be made come spring and enjoy a sweet maple treat or sit a spell in a rocker and enjoy the warmth of the fire in the huge stone fireplace.

There are a lot more things to see and do Ox-tober Fest Weekend. Each fall, the Scarecrows return to Burton Village.  Business around town put up fun, not scary, creations. Kids of all ages enjoy touring town and seeing the fall handiwork.  They will remain up until October 30.

Burton Village is home to an array of unique locally owned businesses.  Explore the glass-blowing shop filled with unique works of art for the home, the vintage furniture store, the new funky boutique with clothing, jewelry and accessories, art in flowers at the florist, the old-fashioned hardware store or the gift and Amish rug shop. Each store is filled with items not found in a big box store or mall.

The park will be filled with craft vendors selling an assortment of items from 10 to 5.

For those who are enjoying their visit and don’t want to leave, the Red Maple Inn and Goodwin House B&B offer comfortable accommodations.

The Apple Butter Festival will be held on the grounds of the Geauga County Historical Society the same weekend.  Large copper kettles are set up and fresh apple butter is being made.  You can sample some fresh from the kettle on homemade bread or take a jar or two home to enjoy later.

Fall in Burton Village is a special time of the year. October 11 & 12 will have many extra things to see and do.  Plan to bring the family and spend the day, or two. For more information call Tom Blair, 440-834-4949, Amy at the Log Cabin, 440-834-4204 or visit www.burtonchamberofcommerce.com.

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The Portage County Health Department has once again combined efforts with local school districts, fire departments, and township trustees to host community flu shot clinics throughout Portage County. This is an effort to protect the health of all Portage County residents by making flu shot clinics convenient to all residents in their own communities.

The Health Department will be providing the quadrivalent flu vaccine this 2014-15 flu season. This flu vaccine contains 2 influenza A viruses (H1N1/H3N2) and 2 influenza B viruses. This will provide additional protection against the seasonal flu this year.

Vaccination is the best way to prevent the flu! Who should be vaccinated?

• Everyone 6 months and older (Recommendation from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention)

• Especially:

Pregnant Women; People with chronic medical conditions; including asthma and diabetes; Children younger than 5 years of age

Schedule of Community Clinics

October 2 Rootstown Rootstown Fire Department 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 5 Edinburg Edinburg Fire Department 9:00 am-12:00 pm

October 7 Paris Township Paris Township Community Center 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 8 Mantua Township Mantua Civic Center 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 9 Streetsboro Streetsboro City Hall Gymnasium 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 12 Suffield Suffield Fire Department 11:00 am-3:00 pm

October 15 Kent City Kent City Health Department 3:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 16 Aurora Aurora City Fire Department 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 20 Brimfield Brimfield Townhall 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 21 Garrettsville James A. Garfield Elementary 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 23 Windham Village Windham Renaissance Family Center 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 28 Windham Village Windham Renaissance Family Center 11:00am-3:00pm

October 29 Ravenna Portage County Health Dept. 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

October 30 Atwater Township Atwater Fire Department 4:00 pm-6:00 pm

Flu clinics will continue to be scheduled throughout October. Updated flu clinic calendar, location calendar, and addresses for community clinics can be found on the Portage County Health Department website: www.co.portage.oh.us/healthdepartment.htm.

Newton Falls – On September 20th a banquet was held at the Newton Falls VFW Post 3332 to honor past Commanders & past Presidents. Honorees and their guests enjoyed a banquet catered by Roby Lees.

State VFW Commander Bob Pool & his wife Susan and State VFW Auxiliary President, Sandra Uzell & husband Clayton attended the event, a first for the Post which has made the banquet an annual event to honor their leadership and remember those who are no longer with them. Also attending were VFW District 8 Sr. Vice Commander Mark Ross, American Legion Post 212 Commander Joe Ball & Kim Shaulis.

Past Commanders present were, WWII Vets, Gideon Fetterolf and Faustian “Fudge” Rapczak, Commander Ray Hanzes (current &15 times past), Bill Douglas, Alex Kish and Ron Widowfield.

Past Auxiliary Presidents in attendance were: Donna Himes, Bobby Jo Stiltner, Wanda Thompson, (current & 7 times past), Doris Hawkins, (6 times past), Emma Gilanyi & Dorothy Cooke, (3 times past).

After the Pledge of Allegiance and the singing of God Bless America, Raymond Ornelas, Past District 8 Commander & Pin Chairman, conducted the POW/MIA Ceremony honoring those who were captured or missing in action.

WWII Veteran Gideon Fetterolf, Past Chaplain gave the invocation.

Following the banquet a memorial service took place with Quartermaster Steve Garcar lighting candles for each deceased past Commander and Chaplain Rosemary Domyanich lighting candles for the past Presidents.

Jr. Vice Commander Ron Domyanich played taps.

A slight twist in the evening occurred, when Commander Ray Hanzes was presented with the Man of the Year award instead of presenting it. Past President Donna Himes presented the Woman of the Year award to Auxiliary member Julie Smeiles, who serves as Jr. Vice, Historian & Legislation Chair.

Many thanks go out to Banquet Committee Chairman Pete Price, Co-Chair & Decorating Committee Donna Himes, the Welcome Committee, Steve & Marlene Garcar, and the Auxiliary for the hors’doeuvres, all together made for a memorable evening.

The Hiram Village Fire Department has two levies on the ballot next month — the renewal of a 2-mil EMS levy and an additional 3-mil Fire Protection levy. Mr. Dave Loader, a long-time resident of Hiram Township, shared the reason he plans to support these valuable tax levies in November.

Early one morning late winter morning in 2013, Dave’s son-in-law Rob stopped by the house, to drop off a grandson for Dave to babysit. Shortly after Rob’s arrival, however, without notice, Dave suddenly dropped to the floor. Dave related the story he’s been told, since he has no memory of what happened — the last thing he remembers is talking with Rob.

Luckily, as Dave fell, his son-in-law caught Dave’s head in his hands, guiding it gently to the floor. He then grabbed the nearby phone and immediately dialed 911, summoning the Hiram Squad, who arrived within 5 minutes. According to Hiram Village Fire Department Chief Bill Byers, “On that snowy morning, the Fire Department received a call to assist a man who had fallen. Upon arrival, the team found Mr. Loader not breathing, with no pulse.” He was in full cardiac arrest. Dave’s heart had stopped, but the Hiram EMS crew was able to use the automated external defibrillator (AED) restart his heart. “The team was able to resuscitate him, but could not transport him via Life Flight due to poor weather conditions. They braved icy roads to transport Mr. Loader to Geauga Hospital,” explained Chief Byers. Dave was told that the AED was needed again on the way to University Geauga Hospital. For saving his life on that blustery day, Dave credits, “my son-in-law, Rob; the Hiram Squad; and God — all three worked together in perfect timing.”

The next thing Dave remembered was waking up in University Geauga Hospital, where he spent several days. During that time, it was determined that Dave would need surgery to place stents to improve blood flow to the arteries in his heart. But to further complicate matters, it was learned that Dave’s heart had shifted inside his chest cavity. This was due to the fact that several years prior, Dave had undergone a lobectomy, in which part of his lung was removed to combat lung cancer. As a result, according to Dave, his heart had moved, making the surgery more challenging. After Dave and his family consulted with his doctors, it was decided that the procedure would take place at University Hospital’s Cleveland location. Dave made a full recovery.

Dave and his wife Danielle, have lived in Hiram since1967. They moved to the area when they left California, where they had both been stationed in the Air Force.  His wife, who is originally from Mantua, wanted to return to the area where she was raised so they would be surrounded by family as they started their life together.

They have four daughters, four sons-in-law, and 11 grandchildren. Rob, who is married to their youngest daughter, is the newest son-in-law to join the family. “We joke that after this experience, Rob quickly moved to the top of my list as favorite.”

Also at the top of his list is renewal of the Hiram Village Tax Levy for Emergency Medical Services, which will be on November’s ballot. Renewing this levy will allow the Department to have two people on duty around the clock. “Because I know firsthand that quick response is so important,” Dave concluded.

Garrettsville –  Paper in the windows, a new blue roof and trucks with shelving and boxes left many wondering just what was going on in Garfield Plaza.  Last Thursday the speculation was over as the Petersons announced the new location of their family owned and operated GeeVille Auto Parts. A staple in the community for 40 years, their new 5,000 square foot NAPA store has allowed them to more than double their inventory and offer additional services including the ability to make hydraulic hoses.  Stop in today, check out their new store located at 8015 State Street and see why GeeVille Auto has been the “go-to” parts store since 1974.

On Monday, September 29th, Pizza Hutt opened its doors to the Garrettsville community with a full parking lot, lobby and lines at the pick-up window confirming their market study that Garrettsville loves pizza. The new Pizza Hutt WingStreet, located at 8001 State Street offers carryout and delivery and can be reached at 330-527-0909.

Watch the Villager for information about grand opening celebrations for both GeeVille Auto and Pizza Hutt.

Garrettsville – James A Garfield principal Michael Dobran announced today that Jason Richmond has  been named  a  Commended Student in the 2015 National Merit Scholarship Program. A Letter of Commendation from the school and National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC), which conducts the program, will be presented by the principal to this  scholastically talented senior.

About 34,000 Commended Students throughout the nation are being recognized for their exceptional academic promise. Although they will not continue in the 2015 competition for National Merit Scholarship awards, Commended Students placed among the top five percent of more than 1.5 million students who entered the 2015 competition by taking the 2013 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT®).

“The young men and women being named Commended Students have demonstrated outstanding potential for academic success,” commented a spokesperson for NMSC. “These students represent a valuable national resource; recognizing their accomplishments, as well as the key role their schools play in their academic development, is vital to the advancement of educational excellence in our nation. We hope that this recognition will help broaden their educational opportunities and encourage them as they continue their pursuit of academic success.”

Rootstown – Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) continued the celebration of its 40th anniversary and campus expansion efforts with the dedication of the NEOMED Education and Wellness (NEW) Center on Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. During the dedication, Summa Health System of Akron, Ohio, announced that it will be offering on-site, primary care services to the community beginning in 2015.

The 177,000-square-foot facility was made possible through a public-private partnership between NEOMED, Signet Development and Integrated Wellness Partners and is a major step in shifting the overall culture of health and wellness for the campus and surrounding community. The NEW Center provides medical education alongside a state-of-the-art fitness environment, physicians’ offices, advanced practice pharmacy services, conference and event space and more.

“This facility not only grows our campus in an exciting new way, but it is the cornerstone of our community wellness initiatives,” said Jay A. Gershen, D.D.S., Ph.D., president of Northeast Ohio Medical University. “By collaborating with other health professionals, NEOMED is bringing an innovative vision of health and fitness to Portage County, one that promotes true wellness by addressing every avenue of care to develop and sustain healthy, active lifestyles.”

These synergies between education and wellness are further enhanced through a new partnership with Summa Health System, which will be occupying 7,000-square-feet of outfitted space on the first floor of the NEW Center in the coming year. The health system will offer comprehensive primary care, non-emergency daytime walk-in care, corporate and employee health services, pharmacy consultation,  physical therapy and lab services to the NEOMED and Rootstown communities, while also serving as a training ground for NEOMED students.

“We are excited to enhance even more our longstanding relationship with NEOMED,” said Summa Health System President and CEO, Tom Strauss. “As we continue to transform the delivery of health care away from a model of sick care to one that truly promotes healthy living, having outstanding facilities such as the NEOMED Education and Wellness Center is critical. I applaud the community for coming together to make this initiative possible, and we are proud to be involved in such an important way.”

In addition to addressing the primary health care needs of the community, the NEW Center offers first-floor amenities focused on nutrition and physical wellness. Two new public eateries, the Bistro and Erie Island Coffee House, offer healthy eating options, and Sequoia Wellness, a facility that focuses on building healthier communities by encouraging a comprehensive view of wellness that incorporates fitness, nutrition, exercise, education and more, has memberships available to the community and campus. The Conference and Event Center, located on the second floor, can host formal and informal events for up to 500 guests and will be utilized for professional and community meetings, lectures and presentations about medical field advancements, as well as personal events such as weddings, services and other private gatherings.

As a medical university, education also plays a large part in the overall use of the NEW Center. A state-of-the-art lecture hall serves as a main educational classroom for interprofessional and college-centric learning for students on the NEOMED campus;  the third floor of the facility is dedicated to Bio-Med Science Academy, the public STEM+M high school on NEOMED’s campus.

“We are truly honored to be a part of the extraordinary campus transformation at NEOMED and our team is delighted to collaborate with the University on a project that is already enriching the academic experience for NEOMED students, enhancing the delivery of health care services for the community, and creating a hub of activity on-campus for all of Portage County,” said Tony S. Manna, chairman of Signet Enterprises, LLC.

Connect directly with the NEW Center at http://www.neomed.edu/newcenter.

Mantua – Last Friday, on a gorgeous fall day, the kids at Crestwood Primary and Intermediate Schools strapped on their sneakers to raise money for field trips, field day, and educational opportunities at their schools. Instead of hitting the sidewalks to sell candy, wrapping paper, or other items to family and friends; to raise much-needed funds, parents and their students sought out community sponsors. They asked for support, not just of the schools, but for student wellness, as well.

crestwood-mantua-walkathon-october-2014-outdoorOver the course of the school day, each student in every class — from preschool through grade five — as well as teachers and staff — took a one-mile hike around the perimeter of the campus. Their teachers led the way through the campus green space, wearing pedometers to track the number of steps. At the end of the day, the grand total of 1,287,442 steps was reached — or nearly 130 miles!

Students wore shirts to signify their grade levels; Preschool wore light blue, Kindergarten in yellow, first graders were in dark blue, 2nd graders wore orange, 3rd graders wore red, 4th was in grey, with 5th graders in white. And most everyone wore a smile as they enjoyed being outdoors for the school-wide activity.

In addition to raising an estimated $2,500 per school, the event also raised awareness of healthy choices. Before starting their walk, students warmed up by jumping rope and using hula-hoops. One first-grade participant rejoiced, saying, “Watch me — I was made to hula hoop!” Halfway through their hike, participants stopped for a water and music break. Accompanied by such songs as ‘These Boots Are Made for Walking’ and “Happy,” they continued their trek, refreshed, and with a kick in their step.  After completing their mile, each participant received a healthy snack of apple slices and a bottle of water, courtesy of McDonalds & Subway in Mantua, and Giant Eagle in Ravenna.

Event sponsors included: Ace’s Well Service, Sayre Construction, Fortis College, RDP Printing, Star Therapy, Streetsboro Family Days/ Allen Alloy, Coldwell Banker Streetsboro, Mantua Station Drug, NAPA, Oscar Brugmann Sand & Gravel, OK Brugmann Jr & Sons Inc., Aurora Auto Wash, Candance Academy, Piranha Technologies, Trinity Farm, Varkala Services, Inc., F & S Automotive, Carlton Harley Davidson, Kuchenbecker Farms, Express Systems, Sunshine Cupcakes, Advanced Rehab, Montgomery’s Pallet Service, Derthick’s Farm, Portage Trim, Gateway Towing, Kristoff Electric, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Crestwood Intermediate School Staff, Valerie Agle (Equestrian Vet Clinic), and Streetsboro Sports Medicine – Dr. Bartsokas.

Due to the success of this first-time event, teachers, staff, and parent volunteers look forward to holding it again next year.

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Across the world, many nations are engaged in political conflicts. At the same time, millions of paper pinwheels emblazoned with childrens’ messages of peace and hope spin worldwide, in places like South America, the Middle East, and even Mantua, Ohio. Last Friday, Crestwood students from kindergarten through grade five planted hand-made pinwheels at Crestwood Intermediate & Primary Schools to help commemorate the International Day of Peace.

Pinwheels for Peace is an art installation project started nine years ago by teachers in Florida as a way for students to express their feelings about what was happening in their lives, and in the world around them. In the first year of the project, groups in over 1,325 locations around the world were spinning nearly 500,000 pinwheels on the International Day of Peace. Last year, over four million pinwheels were spinning in over 3,500 locations, including the United States, Europe, Asia, Australia, Canada, the Middle East, Africa and South America.

Locally, School Counselor Gary Traveny coordinated the project. He explained, “This project is non-political. Peace doesn’t necessarily have to be associated with the conflict of war, it can be related to violence or intolerance in our daily lives.”  To participate, each student created a pinwheel; one side features their thoughts on peace, tolerance, and living in harmony, they drew images to express their feelings on the opposite side.

The school-wide program was held outdoors on a crisp, autumn day and featured student-read poetry and music performed by the fifth grade choir. Afterwards, students planted their pinwheels around the grounds of Crestwood’s Primary and Intermediate Schools. In addition, children received a special bookmark to remember their part in supporting “whirled peace.”

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Hiram – The Hiram Police Department recently held its Annual Car Show that is a fund raiser for the “Shop with a Cop” program. Although the weather did not cooperate fully there was a great turnout for the event. Car enthusiasts came from as far as Wooster Ohio to show off their antique, vintage, muscle, hot rod cars. When folks learned that the car show was a fund raiser for the Shop with a Cop program, nothing was going to hold them back from coming out and supporting the cause, not even an overcast rainy day. The event was filled with family fun, great food, music, prizes and trophies. Kepich Ford in Garrettsville was the event’s main sponsor and also had a display of muscle cars and a modified truck.

Almost $1,000.00 was raised from the event from a 50/50 raffle and donations. “I am overjoyed at the amount of funds that was raised at the event, the Shop with a Cop programs survives solely upon fund raisers and donations and the outpouring of support is heartwarming”.  The Shop with a Cop program allows underprivileged children to go Christmas shopping for themselves and their families while accompanied by police officers from Hiram and Garrettsville Police Departments.

“We have had such success with the Shop with a Cop program, we have partnered with Garrettsville and extend the program to their school district, it is our eventual goal that no child goes without during the holiday seasons due to financial strains and poverty.” We would like to graciously thank our event sponsors: Kepich Ford, Garrettsville Advance Auto, Hiram College Bookstore, G’Ville Auto, Hiram College, Sodexco, Hiram Maggie’s Donuts, Charles Chevrolet, Mantua Italian Garden, Village Motors, Hiram Gioninos Pizza, Portage Portable Toilets, Garrettsville Dairy Queen, Pam Collins of Owl Origami, Sky Lane Bowling, Garrettsville McDonald’s, Sabre Health Care, Hiram Corner Store and Café, and Garrettsville Ace Hardware. Due to your generous donations we were able to provide lots of awesome door prizes.

If you were unable to attend the Car Show fund raiser and wish to provide a donation to the Shop with a Cop program, please contact Hiram Police Department Chief Ed Samec (330) 569-3236.

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Hiram – Little Village Early Learning Center at Hiram Christian Church celebrated the dedication of their new outdoor classroom and playground on September 16, 2014 at 4:30PM.  The ribbon cutting was a culmination of months of planning, cooperation and coordination between Little Village and its many partners, including Hiram College, Kiwanis of the Western Reserve and Hiram Village as well as individual families and churches.

Hiram College education professor and Little Village Advisory Committee member, Jennifer McCreight, observed, “The dedication of the playground is just the latest in a long string of events that have made clear the Hiram community supports Little Village.  Having worked on the playground with multiple classes, and watching as it grew in size and scope due to generous donations and creative vision, I see the contributions of so many when I step back and admire it today.”  Highlights of this one-of-a-kind toddler and preschool friendly playground include an outdoor mud kitchen, drum area made from creatively repurposed materials, raised bed flower and vegetable gardens, a tree shaped play structure, and a tricycle track complete with gas station.

The playground will be used by the school during their hours of operation, 7AM-6PM, and is open to the public after hours and on weekends.    For more information, call Little Village Early Learning Center at 330-569-7101 or visit littlevillagehiram.org.

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Garrettsville – Portage County District Library announces that it has received a grant from the Hiram Community Trust to coordinate a makerspace within the Garrettsville Library. Funds have been used to purchase materials and supplies for the makerspace. A makerspace is a creative space where community members can gather to create and share ideas. The library’s makerspace will feature creative spaces in the following areas: jewelry making, bookbinding, scrapbooking, quilting, electronics, photo editing, and video game development software. Additional funds have been provided by Garrettsville’s Fraternal Order of Eagles.

The future makerspace will be located in the Garrettsville Library, located at 10482 South Street in Garrettsville, and will be available during specified hours. Library hours are Monday and Tuesday, 11:00 am until 7:00 pm; Wednesday and Friday, 10:00 am until 6:00 pm; Saturday, 9:00 am until 5:00 pm; and closed on Thursday and Sunday. For more information about other library programs and services, visit the Portage County District Library online at www.portagelibrary.org.

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Another bowling season has begun and the youth bowlers are already making their mark.  There will be some names you recognize and some new names as we begin another year of reporting their Saturday morning scores.

Lauren Sanchez started off the year with a bang!  Lauren had her first 500 series on the first week of bowling, a 526 with games of 179, 191 and 156.  But then on week two she had her first 600 series.  Lauren rolled games of 210, 214, and 183 for a very nice 607 series.  Lauren’s 526 was in the 11:00 Trio League and her 607 was in the Scholastic League.  Lauren is a 7th grader at Garfield Middle School and I’m sure coach Joe Brigham can’t wait for her to get to high school!

David Martin, in his first set for the Saturday 11:00 Trio, rolled 170, 221, and 183 for a very nice 574 series.  Jacob Briton started his year off with a nice 501 series.  Billy Potteiger rolled a 204 game and 473 series.  Other nice games:  Lucas Titschinger, 157, Rayne Burdette, 86, Gavin Dunfee, 95.

Good games bowled by the 9:00 Trio set:  Addrianna Conway, 143, Ryleigh Gough, 129, Alex Gage, 160, Emily Linamen, 130, Pete Maldonado, 105, Brooke Collins, 106, Isaac Trickett, 110, Kelly Stemnock, 137, Sara Barker, 115, and Zachary Seebacher, 110.

In the Scholastic League, nobody topped Lauren’s 607 set, but Nick Toke was close with 206-590.  Other good games:  Zachary Britton, 232, Collin McGurer, 234, and Jaret Doraski, 201-577.

High scores for the PeeWees:  SadieMae Ewell, 108, Cole Thompson, 105 and 104, Mackenzie Thompson, 104, and Angelo Dinardo, 102.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot?

Nah.  Come to the  James A. Garfield Alumni Banquet and remember all that good old stuff with good old friends AND good food .  Yup.  It was a good one.

The organizing committee members—Helen Louise Paul Bouts, Elaine Lange Duffield, Ruth Becks Herrington, Bonnie Ball Oliver, Kit Younker Semplak, Judy Davison Toth, Carolyn Lange Unaitis, Sherri Seals Collins, Tom Collins, Christine Lumbert Pitsinger and Ted Lysiak—put together a fine meal catered by Guido’s, floral décor by Art N Flowers, reminiscences by all sorts of folks and an introduction to the new addition to the Garfield Elementary building which had just had its official ribbon cut at ten o’clock that very morning.  The James A. Garfield Marching Pride made a cameo appearance to greet the early arrivers before heading off to a band show at Stow-Monroe Falls High School, where they wowed the crowd in the name of the district.

Classes of special recognition—1944(Yay, Dick Davis and Helen Lewis Manlove), 1954, 1964 and 1994)were presented with some memory-joggers about the prices of things like gas and houses during their salad days.  Board of Education president Guy Pietra was the Peerless Speaker and board vice president David Vincent offered the blessing.  The look at the new addition, built through the $5million Straight A Grant (The only application to receive unanimous approval) to produce a Campus of Excellence, was an eye-opener and a source of pride…mingled, no doubt, with amazement.  Any food not consumed on the spot was donated to the Center of Hope as a community outreach.

It was a fine old time with friends and family (note the number of Collinses and Andrewses, among others, in attendance) and the date has already been set for the next one.  Mark your calendars for September 19, 2015, same time , same place.  Everybody learn the Alma Mater!

There’s a story about that.

Off Limits Canoeing.

Sat. Oct. 4, 1-3:30 pm. Bass Lake, a natural glacial lake near Chardon, is a new preserve of the Geauga Parks. Bass Lake, the headwaters of the Chagrin River, is closed to the general public and is the home of several rare species including nesting bald eagles and the” rarest of the rare” the native Ohio Brook Trout. Sighting bald eagle is guaranteed.  The shoreline edge includes a variety of marshland and swamp forest supporting a diverse wildlife community.  Registration required.  330-569-4962. bobfaber2002@yahoo,com  The fee is $15 and includes naturalist guides, safety personnel, canoes and all equipment.

Lost River and Hidden Lake.

Sat. Oct. 11, 9-noon. Explore the isolated landscape in one of the most remote sections of the Cuyahoga River in Troy Township. This Akron Watershed property has a little known path that wends its way through remote forests to an oxbow lake that few people have seen.  The wild landscape is also the site of a mysterious river diversion that deserves further investigation.  Limited to 8 participants. Registration required.  330-569-4962. bobfaber2002@yahoo,com

Fall Tree Identification Hike 

Oct 11 10 am  Eagle Creek State Nature Preserve

Join the preserve manager as we take in the beauty of fall in one of NE Ohio’s most diverse nature preserves. This hike will include some basic tree identification skills and application as we trek through the upland forests and bogs of the preserve. The trees will be “showing their true colors” as we discuss the changes we see in the foliage this time of year. The hike will begin at 10:00am at the preserve parking lot located at 11027 Hopkins Rd. Garrettsville, OH. This is a free hike and registration is not required. For more information contact Adam Wohlever at (330)-527-5118

Kent Bog Fall Foliage Hike 

Oct 18 10 am  Kent Bog State Nature Preserve

Join the preserve manager this fall as we explore the Kent Bog State Nature Preserve during a time of change. We will spend some of our focus on one of only two deciduous conifers in this region of the United States, the Tamarack. The hike will begin at 10:00am at the preserve parking lot located at 1028 Meloy Rd. Kent, OH. This is a free hike and registration is not required. For more information contact Adam Wohlever at (330)-527-5118

Autumn Wetlands Hike 

Oct 18 1 pm Tinker’s Creek State Nature Preserve

Join the preserve manager as we explore the vast wetlands of Tinker’s Creek State Nature Preserve. We will discuss wetland ecology and take time to view the bald eagle nest. This is preserve can also be a spectacular location for any “leaf peepers”! The hike will begin at 1:00pm at the preserve parking lot located at 1230 Old Mill Rd.  Aurora, OH. This is a free hike and registration is not required. For more information contact Adam Wohlever at (330)-527-5118.

 

A Holden Arboretum “Off the Beaten Path” Adventure

Sat. Nov. 29,  10-3 pm Lake Erie Winter Wings-Birds, Boats, and Buffet. Ohio’s “sweet water sea” is the winter home for thousands and thousands of gulls and ducks including some that are quite rare and unusual. Most of the North America’s red breasted mergansers spend their winter on Lake Erie and flocks of Tundra Swans often rest on the lake during their migration from the Arctic to the east coast. Birds of prey haunt the lakeshore including bald eagles, peregrine falcons, and, on occasion, snowy owls. The cruise will be in the sheltered waters of the Cuyahoga River and inside of the breakwall on the lake. A buffet lunch, included in the fee, will be at the Edgewater Yacht Club. Includes dinner.  Leaders Bob Faber and Dan Donaldson.  Fee $69 for members, $89 nonmembers. Register online at holdenarb.org or 440-602-3833

 

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Hiram  – Northeast Ohio entrepreneurs are invited to join Hiram College’s Center for Integrated Entrepreneurship for several entrepreneurship workshops this semester. The workshops are designed to encourage members of Hiram College and the greater Cleveland community to explore and develop their original ideas

The first of these workshops, Intellectual Property, will take place from 3-5 p.m. on Sept. 26, 2014 in East Hall Forum. Workshops are free for Hiram students, $10 for Hiram alumni and $20 for all others.

Salvatore A. Sidoti ’93, principal of Curatolo Sidoti Co. LPA, will lead the workshop.

Sidoti has experience in all phases of intellectual property law. His practice involves client counseling, patent and trademark procurement, trade secret and dispute resolution. He has experience in the chemical, biochemical, materials science and polymer arts. He also has substantial experience before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.  Topics will include:

· Process of intellectual-property development – patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets

· Rules of thumb for determining whether a particular piece of intellectual property is worth the time and expense of protecting.

· Conducting basic patent searches

Future workshops include:

· “So you have an idea; now what?” – Oct. 17, 3-5 p.m., East Hall Forum; presented by Jack Burge, Director of Economic and Entrepreneurial Development, City of Aurora

· “Franchise: Business in a Box” – Nov. 7, 3-5 p.m., East Hall Forum; presented by Jack Warren, Director of Operations, Comfort Keepers

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Windham – The Windham Library, a branch of the Portage County District Library, will offer two career classes. On Thursday, October 9 from 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm the library will be having a two-part class on how to write a resume and cover letter. The class will walk the participants through writing a resume and cover letter from start to finish. Participants will also be able to print 5 copies of their resume and cover letters for free. It is strongly recommended that participants bring with them a USB Drive to save the resume and cover letter they create. Seats in the class are limited and sign up is required.

On Thursday, October 16 from 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm the library will be having a class on how to sign up for a free Careerbuilder account and search for jobs. The class will walk the participants through creating an account on Careerbuilder and searching for jobs. It is strongly recommended that participants bring with them their resume and cover letter. Seats in the class are limited and sign up is required.

To sign up, go to the circulation desk at the Windham Library or call 330-326-3145. The Windham Library, located at 9005 Wilverne Drive, is open Mondays and Fridays, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00 pm – 6:30 pm; and closed Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. For additional information about library programs and services, please visit the Portage County District Library online at www.portagelibrary.org.

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Geauga County - Absentee ballots for the November 4th General Election will be available beginning 8:00 am, September 30, 2014 until 2:00 pm, November 3, 2014.  Application deadline for absentee ballots to be mailed out is Noon on Saturday, November 1, 2014.

Applications for absentee ballots are available on line at http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/Upload/elections/forms/11-A.pdf  or you can call the Geauga County Board of Elections directly at 440-279-2030.

Completed forms are to be mailed to: Geauga County Board of Elections; 470 Center Street, Bldg. 6-A; Chardon, OH  44024

The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot to be mailed is Saturday, November 1, 2014 at noon.

The Board of Elections is normally open from 8:00 am – 4:30pm.  For your convenience the board office will be open for extended hours after September 29th.  Please see the Geauga County Board of Elections website at http://www.co.geauga.oh.us/Departments/BOE for a detailed list of dates and times.

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award-portage-countyPortage County – Wondering how the first annual Portage County Celebration Week turned out? “In a word, it was awesome!” beamed Todd Peetz, Director of the Portage County Regional Planning Commission (PCRPC). “Everyone who participated really enjoyed it,” he concluded. The week-long event kicked off with a sold-out Premier of High School Bands, which was held at the Theodore Roosevelt High School Stadium in Kent. Performing bands included Kent Roosevelt, Ravenna Ravens Marching Band, Stow-Munroe Falls Bulldog Marching Band, Cuyahoga Falls Tiger Marching Band, Tallmadge Blue Devils Marching Band, and the Springfield Marching Band.

In addition, the United Way of Portage County sponsored a Volunteer Day, with 12 projects being completed simultaneously around the county. Local projects of note included sprucing up the grounds around the Center School in Mantua Township and scraping and repainting the stanchion streets markers in Mantua Village. Later that week, over 700 car enthusiasts showcased their classic cars in Ravenna at the A&W Drive-In and Mongoose Motorsports.  Area businesses were swamped as families flocked to see hot rods, enjoy root beer floats, and family fun. But the highlight of the week was an  “Oscar”-style awards dinner held at the Bertram in Aurora, and featuring winners from throughout the county.

Mantua’s Art on the Hill event won the Cultural Arts Initiative Award, which recognized a program of arts and cultural awareness that helps to enhance the value and character of their community. The annual summer event, ‘Art on the Hill’ (‘AOTH’), from the Downtown Mantua Revitalization Corporation (DMRC), is an arts & cultural event music, food, and artisans, and draws thousands of visitors to their one-day event each year. “We are really excited and hope it will help bring more artisans and attendees next year to our Annual Art on the Hill event,” marveled Edie K. Benner, Downtown Mantua Revitalization President. She continued, “Our committee worked tirelessly and they deserve recognition for doing such a great job. And kudos to the Portage Regional Planning Commission and their team for hosting the event,” Benner concluded. Art on the Hill won this category, which also included the Ravenna Balloon Affair, Streetsboro Family Days and the Kent Heritage Festival.

Next up was the award for Most Engaging High School Initiative, honoring the innovative programs that have successfully and measurably enhanced relationships between the school and its community. Aurora High School was honored for a non-traditional program offered in place of study hall, where students dictate what they are going to learn, the conditions they are going to learn under, and how they will demonstrate what they learn.  As a result of this program, students have investigated: graphic design, electronics (hardware), computer science (coding), comic book development (storyline & artwork), investigation into design including the use of Sketch-Up, fashion blog, recycling process (separation of rubber from steel-belted tires), running shoe design & development, video game development, and fashion illustration. That’s quite an impressive list of projects undertaken.

Next up, the winner of the Economic Development Award, for an organization that has provided valuable develop in terms of employment, income, and quality of life was the Catacel Corporation. Founded in 2001 originally as a manufacturer of emission control products, the company has become a leader in fuel cells and industrial hydrogen.  Today, their engineers and manufactures break-through, proprietary catalytic heat exchanging materials, holds 22 US patents, and significantly reduce costs in the hydrogen production and fuel cell industries by increasing process output and improving energy efficiencies. In September of 2013, Catacel moved to an idle manufacturing plant in the City of Ravenna, where the company is now a cornerstone tenant. Catacel arrived with 26 employees and has grown to 30 with plans to add more this fall. Occupying 22,000 square feet in the newly- renovated facility, the company has also made many facility improvements, included new windows, energy efficient lighting, office renovation, and an epoxy-coated manufacturing floor that sparkles. Catacel is engaged in sales, engineering, and manufacturing operations that serve customers in markets all over the world.

The award for Community Hero was given to Streetsboro resident Kathleen Schuman for her work at the Streetsboro Community Pantry. This busy wife, mother and grandmother, finds time to volunteer at the Streetsboro Community Pantry, purchasing groceries, ordering food & arranging pick ups at the Akron Food Bank; she also stocks shelves, trains volunteers, and takes on the many other responsibilities to operate this agency, which serves between 70-100 families each month. She would be the first to insist that this operation succeeds because of the team effort, but there are many people relying on her energy, focus and inspiration to be able to provide free groceries to the numerous families of Streetsboro who rely on this service.

The last award recognized an initiative that demonstrated an action or activity that brings young people, adults and families together. The award for Community Service was given to Root House, the first-ever residential addiction treatment facility in Portage County, which opened in June of 2013.  Founded by Mike and Valerie Root, who tragically lost their son to a heroin overdose, and recovered addict Jeremy Taugner, who struggled with the same issues. They shared the vision of opening a treatment center in Portage County for men so that others would not have to suffer like they did. With assistance from Family and Community Services and Portage County Mental Health and Recovery Board, they were able create a 90-day residential program for struggling addicts who have detoxed and are committed to staying clean.

“We learned a lot, made a few mistakes along the way, but all in all it turned out very well,” concluded Peetz. Due to the success of this year’s program, PCRPC plans to hold the event next year. Plans for next year’s Portage County Celebration Week will begin in January 2015. For more information about next year’s events, visit visioninginportage.org.

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Windham – In today’s world, peace needs to become more than just a word. Students at KT Elementary School took part in an International art and literacy project, Pinwheels for Peace by “planting” pinwheels with messages of peace at their school in Windham.

Mantua – At the last meeting of the Mantua Township Trustees, it was announced that an organizational meeting will be scheduled to discuss committee positions and next steps for work on the Township’s Administrative Building (AKA Center School). As you may recall, letters of interest for committee position were due at the end of July. Director of Regional Planning, Todd Peetz, reviewed those submissions, which he reviewed and provided to trustees. Mr. Peetz will moderate the organizational meeting, which will be held on October 22nd at 7 pm in the Civic Center. The public is encouraged to attend.

In other news, several residents voiced their concerns to trustees over letters sent by the township’s Zoning Inspector, John Dickey. According to residents, Mr. Dickey is requesting information that is not specified in the township’s zoning book, namely, license and registration for vehicles and trailers without BMV license plates that are stored on residents’ property. Residents also maintain that the letter they received notes that no vehicles of this type are permitted, while township regulations state that “no more than one,” is allowed. In addition, the letter in question gave residents 15 days to remedy the situation, noting penalties for non-compliance. Township zoning guidelines stipulate that residents are allowed 30 days for compliance.

The trustees assured residents that the letter in question was meant by Mr. Dickey to be purely a warning letter and not an official citation.  The trustees plan to work with Mr. Dickey to revise the document and clear up any inconsistencies. “We’ll work through it,” stated Trustee John Festa, explaining, “It’s a new thing for all of us,” referring to the newness of both the Zoning Inspector and the township’s zoning book. According to Trustee Jason Carlton, “Changes to the warning letter will be forthcoming.” Proposed revisions will be discussed at the next Trustee meeting. Anyone who has received the letter in question is encouraged to contact the trustees for clarification.

In Old Business, Cal Brant of Brant Carpentry updated trustees on the Town Hall repair project. Mr. Brant thanked volunteers John Festa, Carole Pollard, Ellie Monroe and Mark Hall for their assistance with scraping and repair work to the structure. He noted that representatives from Coon Restoration would be on site next week; an updated project timeline will result. In addition, it was noted that the township’s help-wanted ad for an on-call snowplow operator ran in the paper and was posted on the Township’s website, mantuatownshipohio.gov. Applications are due by October 13th.

Lastly, the township will again be hosting a Flu Shot Clinic on October 8th from 4 – 6 pm at the Township’s Civic Center. According to Trustee Victor Grimm, a four-strain flu shots will be offered for children age six months to 18 years at a cost of $10; adults age 19 – 64 may receive a flu shot for a cost of $30. Individuals age 65 and up can received a high-dose flu shot for $45 and/or a pneumonia shot for $80. The Flu Clinic is provided by the Portage County Health Department.

The next meeting of the Mantua Township Trustees will be held on October 2nd at 7:30 pm.

Garrettsville – The James A. Garfield Local School District cut a ribbon on Saturday, September 20 marking the amazing (120 days!) completion of the addition to the James A. Garfield Elementary School, bringing about the relocation of the district’s fifth and sixth graders to the Campus of Excellence, with all of the system’s students sharing the same venue.  This was made possible through a $5million Straight A Grant from the State of Ohio(The only application to have received unanimous approval) and through the outstanding efforts of a blue-ribbon design and construction team—including local firms  Scotchman Electric(Scott Russell), Doug Seaman Decorating and Rocky Gardens Landscaping(DeanHorvath).  The application process opened one year, to the day, before the ribbon-cutting ceremony and was a total team effort, spearheaded by Superintendent Ted Lysiak and Treasurer Tracy Knauer. Board members, administrators, educators, staff members, students and a community advisory group all played a part in the final concept.

With the awarding of the grant, the clock began ticking and the race was on!

Bob McCullough of Hammond Construction, Melanie Friedman of FMD Architects spoke briefly of the challenges faced.  Charlie Fury, superintendent of the whole construction project, was praised.

Guy Pietra, Board President, and Rick Patrick, Mayor of Garrettsville, offered thanks and appreciation to key players who were major factors in the co-operating elements which made the timeline work—Don Long, Carrie  Dornack, principals; Ellen Rybak, GEA president; maintenance and custodial staff; students and teachers; village maintenance crews and permitting bodies.  It was an over-all effort, one illustration of which was the newly-waxed floors   of the building, done early that morning by Elementary head custodian, Judy Gyulai, since “her” building is now “our”  building and she’s proud.

The refreshments and the tour were icing on the cake.

It’s not just about the building.  It’s about BUILDING for the future.

Nelson Twp. – The Nelson Township Veterans Memorial Committee wanted to update our community of the status of this important project. This has been a very challenging year of endeavor in the construction of this tribute to our veterans. The Nelson Township Veterans Memorial has been designed and we are in the process of obtaining necessary permits. The next step will be to detail a project time table with a target of next spring for ground breaking.

We would like to thank those people & organizations that have donated to this cause. We have contacted several organizations and will follow up in the future for donations. We continue to invite veterans and their families to contact us with the veteran’s name, branch of service and time in service. Please go to the following web site, www.yournelsonnews.com/veteransmemorialnews.html for additional information.

Nelson Twp. – Residents gathered at the Nelson Community House on Wednesday, September 17th for the second trustee meeting of the month. All trustees and officials were present and accounted for.

Dave Finney presented the board of trustees with the minutes from the previous meeting; the minutes were approved as presented with a motion made by Elias. Finney then presented the trustees with bills and wages to be paid totaling $9,520.87. Trustees also received a fund status report, revenue status report, and a copy of a communication from ODOT stating that the revised order for road salt had been accepted. The vendor Morton Salt accepted the reduction in salt ordered with the  the township agreeing to purchase 200 tons of salt at $108.01/ton.

Vanek believes the chip & seal project will begin within the next week. He reported that crews from the contractor had been out sweeping the projects. This year’s chip and seal work includes: Brosius Road from Center Street to Pierce Road; Adams Road; the southern end of Hopkins Road, and Prentiss Road.

Elias mentioned that a notification will be placed in the Villager in regards to the Veteran’s Memorial Project. The announcement will provide a status update on the project. Finney informed the trustees that as of the September 17th meeting $6,025 had been collected for the project. As a reminder, paving bricks are available at a variety of sponsorship levels. Visit www.yournelsonnews.com for a printable order form. Elias would also like to have a “state of the township” recap at the second trustee meeting in November.

Leonard reported the dry hydrant on Fenstermaker has been pulling some air. The fire department will talk to the landowners to see about relocating the hydrant to a more suitable location on their property with the situation hopefully resolved this fall. Leonard made a motion to help with the project (the township providing backhoe work). He also provided a status update on the 305/88 situation. Leonard has been in contact with two different levels of ODOT, as well as Congressman Joyce, and Representative Kathleen Clyde. ODOT feels that the problem seems to be that people stopping East-West assume North-South have to stop as well. ODOT will be placing larger crossroad warning signs, and replacing “cross traffic does not stop” signs with larger “new style” signs. Matota was asked to find out  how much Hiram spends to do their own chip & seal projects, Leonard indicated that he would be interested to see if there were longterm savings that could be realized by performing the work in-house.

Elias reported that residents have asked the trustees what can be done about issues at the Quarry Park. According to Meduri the only thing that the trustees can do is pass a resolution stating that the park is creating a public nuisance with their concerts. Many residents were present to make their opinions and concerns known. The trustees heard  commentary from both sides, including statements from park owners/operators Joretta Frohring and Evan Kelley. Ultimately the trustees invited everyone to attend the next meeting on October 1st for a civilized public forum that will be attended by township legal council Christopher Meduri, and a representative from the Portage County Sheriff’s Department.

Janet Esposito came in to talk to those present. She provided information about Geographical Information System, and an informational handout of the services offered by the Auditor’s Office.

Following Esposito’s presentation the trustees signed checks, and adjourned the meeting.