Up until the 2013-2013 school year, Ohio public schools and school districts were given one of six ratings: Excellent with Distinction, Excellent, Effective, Continuous Improvement, Academic Watch, and Academic Emergency. The ratings were based on attendance, high school graduation rates, how many students passed the state tests and how well they scored, and the value-added calculation, which is meant to measure how much progress students make in a year. [http://stateimpact.npr.org/ohio/tag/school-report-cards/] According to the 2009-2010 Ohio State Report Card, value-added scores were calculated for reading and mathematics in schools and school districts with grades four through eight. [http://1.usa.gov/1zMCAgR]

Starting in 2012, the state switched to a different system where schools are now given a letter grade: A, B, C, D, or F. The standards have also changed. Graduation rates, test scores, and the value-added calculation are still taken into account, though there’s now an overall value-added calculation as well as specific ones measuring the progress made by gifted students, lower-performing students, and students with disabilities. The new rating system also measures how many students are learning to read in kindergarten through third grade, whether schools are closing the education gap, and how well the schools are preparing students for life after graduation.

The “Gap Closing” grade currently measures how many students are meeting the state standard in reading, math, and graduation rate. Along with the total number of students, there are nine different subgroups that can be evaluated: American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian/Pacific Islander, Black, Hispanic, Multiracial, White, Economically Disadvantaged, Students with Disabilities, and Limited English Proficient. As long as there are thirty students in a subgroup, that subgroup will be measured and factored into the grade. [http://1.usa.gov/1ARwL4G]

The “Prepared for Success” grade currently measures how many students participated in ACT and SAT tests and remediation, how many participated in the Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate programs and how well they scored on the exams, and how many received honors diplomas, dual enrollment credit, and/or industry-recognized credentials.

For answers to your questions, visit the Newton Falls Public Library, 204 S. Canal Street, Newton Falls or phone 330-872-1282. For information about all the free library programs or hours, visit our website at www.newtonfalls.org or our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/NewtonFallsLibrary.

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For answers to your questions, visit the Newton Falls Public Library, 204 S. Canal Street, Newton Falls or phone 330-872-1282. For information about all the free library programs or hours, visit our website at www.newtonfalls.org or our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/NewtonFallsLibrary.