Saturday, September 20, 2014
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Kent – Dr. Beverly J. Warren, president of Kent State University, will speak at the Women’s Equality Day celebration organized by the League of Women Voters of Kent and the KSU Women’s Center on Monday, Aug. 25, 4:30 p.m. at The Overlook, 1519 Overlook Road, Kent.

The League will also announce the establishment of the Helen Dix Scholarship for non-traditional students in honor of LWVK charter member and community leader Helen Dix, who died last year.

August 26 of each year is designated in the United States as Women’s Equality Day. Instituted by Rep. Bella Abzug and first established in 1971, the date commemorates the passage of the 19th Amendment, the Woman Suffrage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave U.S. women full voting rights in 1920.

The Kent League is the local chapter of the League of Women Voters of the United States.  Established after passage of the 19th Amendment to educate voters, the LWV is a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

Newton Twp. – The Newton Township Cemetery Association members invite you to join us on a self-guided walk at Pricetown Cemetery, adjacent to the Pricetown United Methodist Church on Pritchard-Ohltown Road SW, also known as County Line Road at the intersection of East River Road in Newton Township. Parking will be available in the church parking lot.

The date is September 20, 2014 from 1:00 pm until 5:00 pm. A map will be provided marking the locations of the early settlers of Newton and Milton Townships.

The Newton Township Cemetery Association calendar for 2015, featuring photos of the tornado damage that destroyed property thirty years ago in Newton Falls, will be available during the walk and may also be purchased from Art Effects, Newton Falls Printing, Nussles Florist, Roods Wallpaper and Paint and from association members or by calling 330.872.0236 or 330.872.5452. The calendar price is $10.

The next meeting of the association is August 21st at the administration building on Newton Falls-Bailey Road. All residents of Newton Township and Newton Falls are invited to join the association. Membership fee is $5.00 for the remainder of 2014. Annual dues for the year 2015 is $10.00 for individual, each additional family membership is $5.00.

 

missles-in-portage-county

Ravenna - Camp Ravenna Joint Military Training Center (Ohio Army National Guard) is one of four new sites being considered by Congress as an “East Coast” national missile defense location. The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) hosted an informational open house for the public at Ravenna High School gymnasium on August 5, with representatives posted by various placards to answer questions from the public. An environmental impact statement is also being prepared for presentation to Congress.

If the local site is selected, ground-based interceptor missiles would be transported along public roads from Akron-Canton Regional Airport or Youngstown Air Reserve Station to Camp Ravenna. Lieutenant Colonel Chris Snipes said the 55-foot-long, 22-27-ton solid propellant missiles would be housed in 20 underground interceptor silos (missile defense complex), with possible future expansion of up to 60 such silos housed under Camp Ravenna’s 22,000 acres. Their range would be up to 10,000 kilometers to intercept an intercontinental ballistic missile.

During the public meeting, if a civilian wanted their concerns expressed in a formal report to Congress, they could fill out a survey form or speak to a court reporter stationed in a corner of the gym. People opposed to the missile interceptor site being located at Camp Ravenna taped paper bulls-eye symbols to their shirts, saying that Portage County is too densely populated for such a purpose, property values would plummet, and the community would become an attack target if the missile site were located here. They also voiced concerns that the large number of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) waste injection wells in Ohio makes the state more prone to seismic activity, which may not be a stable environment for ground-based missiles.

The other federally-owned locations under consideration include Fort Custer Army National Guard Base in Michigan, SERE East Navy Base in Maine, and Fort Drum Army Installation on New York. Thirty ground-based interceptor missiles currently stand at the ready for homeland defense from Fort Greely, Alaska and Vandenberg AFB in California. Aegis warships are equipped to deploy sea-based interceptor missiles.

In what was termed by MDA representative Ken Anderson as a “capabilities race” rather than an arms race, these additional East Coast sites are being submitted to Congress for consideration in order to bolster the homeland’s capacity to defend itself “against threats from nations such as North Korea and Iran.”

According to an MDA Fact Sheet, “One of the greatest threats facing the world today is the increasing proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction.”

The estimated $1-$5 billion proposed Ballistic Missile Defense System at Camp Ravenna would “engage and destroy limited intermediate and long-range ballistic missile threats in space,” intercepting and destroying them before they reach their intended targets. In doing so, the MDA says, “The ultimate goal of missile defense is to convince aggressors that ballistic missiles are not militarily useful or a worthy investment and place doubt in the minds of potential aggressors that a ballistic attack against the U.S. or its allies can succeed.”

Camp Ravenna — formerly the Ravenna Arsenal — was used by the Army during World War II, employing up to 18,000 people to manufacture bombs and projectiles. The site became a National Guard training center in 1971 and now is used to train troops for deployments. Proponents of the missile defense plan see it as an opportunity for Camp Ravenna to be fully utilized again, with the potential for economic benefits for Portage and Trumbull counties.

Of the four sites under deliberation, none is “preferred,” but all meet the criteria for consideration. The environmental impact statement for Camp Ravenna could take up to two years to complete, assessing potential environmental changes on land use, water resources, air quality, transportation, socioeconomics and other factors. The Department of Defense has not made decision to deploy or construct the CIS at this time. This proposal is considered a fact-finding mission in response to Congress’ request in December 2013 for this study to be conducted.

For more details, go to www.mda.mil. Members of the public can respond to this proposal through September 15. Email comments to MDA.CIS.EIS@BV.com, fax to (913) 458-1091 or mail a written letter to Black & Veatch Special Projects Corp., ATTN: MDA CIS EIS, 6601 College Blvd., Overland Park, KS  66211-1504.

 

Garrettsville - Mike Maschek, the proud owner of the Garrettsville Feed Mill has the inside scoop for the new beginnings that he’s planning for not only his building, but his town. Maschek has always taken an interest in the Mill. For the past seven years, he’s stood from afar imagining the endless possibilities that could occur if the Mill were to be restored. Maschek believes that the Mill is the focal point and the center of Garrettsville, and he has many things planned for its new beginnings. Many people that have taken interest in buying the Mill have thought that it would be easier to just demolish the whole building and start from scratch. This may be the easy thing to do, but if someone were to demolish the building, all the history that is held inside, basically still in time, would be gone forever.

Maschek is known for saying: “You can rebuild all you want, but you can’t rebuild the history of a building.” He has a keen eye for hidden treasure. What others may see as garbage, he looks further into than  most eyes can see. He looks into the hidden possibilities that can come out of anything if the proper time and effort are put into it. As a strong believer in Jesus Christ; Maschek takes one of Jesus’ parables to a whole new level. Jesus talks about the lost treasure in Matthew 13:44-46. Good things are often hidden. “The Mill has been hidden for far too long. When I first laid my eyes on the Mill, I knew that it was something that would have great potential. The possibilities were endless. I kept visualizing what it could look like. The Mill is a focal point of the town and possibly the start of a great revival, both on the streets and in people. I feel like many people weren’t willing to pay the price to see the Mill restored. I believe that this will bring Garrettsville…hope again.”

The willingness of Mike Maschek to see the town of Garrettsville become the best that it can be is something rare, something that is uncommon to find in most people. Maschek who was also the owner of the majority of the Buckeye Block, sees a connection with the March 22 fire, and the Feed Mill. He says, “After the fire, the Feed Mill was a way for me to keep the momentum going. It’s kind of like a kick start to continue. It represents a city that is “Garrettsville Strong”.” We are not giving up. Jesus said, “You don’t take a light and hide it under a bushel, but you place it where it can be seen.” I am putting a lighted cupola on the top of the Feed Mill to offer encouragement, hope and new life to this community.”

Hiram - Starting out just ten years ago in 2004 with two full-time agents and two part-time assistants, Ohio Health Benefits, LLC  (OHB) in Hiram has more than doubled in size, filling their office space on Hayden Street. From health insurance issues and Medicare criteria  to navigating through the Affordable Care Act, OHB works to provide over 6,000 families, self-employed individuals, students, and retirees with affordable health insurance.

Fueled by his background in mechanical engineering, Auble and his team help translate the latest, often perplexing health care information into something his clients can easily understand. This is what really drives his business. “Since we are authorized to offer insurance from many carriers like AARP, Anthem, Medical Mutual, Summa, and more, my colleagues and I undergo constant training to stay apprised of the latest updates and developments in the healthcare arena.” Auble stated, “I really enjoy helping people by taking what most see as a complex, boring topic and explaining it to them in a friendly, understandable way. As a company, we strive to continue to grow and be the best in the industry as a regional authority on individual, family, health care reform and Medicare health insurance.”

In addition to running Ohio Health Benefits, Auble uses that same friendly and straightforward approach to help build businesses in his hometown. In addition to leasing out office space in the Hiram Professional Building, where OHB is located, he recently purchased the former Village Fire Hall. He’s currently in the process of transforming the space to become a cabinet showroom for Goodnight Kitchen & Bath, a company that was slated to open in Garrettsville prior to February’s fire. Hiram’s Mayor, Village Administration, and Police Chief have been very helpful in the process of bringing more businesses to Hiram, Auble shared.

For more information about OHB, visit ohiohealthbenefits.net.

 

Photo courtesy The Harlem Ambassadors

Photo courtesy The Harlem Ambassadors

Garrettsville - The fun begins at 7:00 PM on October 25th (doors open 40 minutes before tip-off), when the internationally acclaimed Harlem Ambassadors take on the Garrettsville Inspectors (Garfield High School Alumni) in a fun-filled, family-friendly evening of basketball showmanship featuring high-flying slam dunks, ball-handling tricks, and hilarious comedy routines at Garfield High School Gymnasium.

Bring the whole family to this event and experience laugh-out-loud comedy basketball for a good cause. There will be an opportunity to win an autographed basketball, purchase Harlem Ambassadors souvenirs, meet the Harlem Ambassadors during a free post-game autograph session, and snacks and beverages will be available for purchase.

A limited number of tickets are available for this event, which benefits the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce’s  #GarrettsvilleStrong fund, and Phase II of the James A. Garfield Stadium Improvement Project.

Advance tickets go on sale Monday, August 18th and may be purchased online at garrettsvillearea.com/tix or at one of many area businesses including: The Villager (8088 Main St); Charles Auto Family (10851 North St); Miller’s Family Restaurant (8045 State St); Garrettsville DQ Grill & Chill (8013 State St); and the James A Garfield School offices when school returns.

Ticket prices are as follows: Adults – $10; Students (12 & Under) – $7; Seniors – $7; Family 4 Pack (4 Tickets & 2 Bags of Popcorn) – $30. Call 330-527-5761 for ticket information.

Stay up to date by visiting www.garrettsvillearea.com/basketball or by joining the event on Facebook.

Learn more about the Harlem Ambassadors at www.harlemambassadors.com

This event has been brought to you by the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Garfield All Sports Boosters.

Sponsorship Opportunities for this event are available. Call 330-527-5761 to learn more!

 

Windham Twp. – The Windham Township Trustees met for a regular meeting on July 31, 2014 in the Windham Township Hall with trustees Dann Timmons, Brian Miller and Richard Gano present. The Fiscal Officer was absent.

The reason for having a regular meeting that was not at the usual time was to open bids for the chip and seal of Colton Road. The only bid received was from H. Luli Construction Company of Mogadore, Ohio for $25,822.92. The trustees expressed their pleasure that the bid came in slightly less than expected and they accepted the bid by unanimous vote.

In other road issues, Dann Timmons reported that Dale Soinski had completed the site for the cul~de-sac at the end of Frasier Road and is now waiting for pavement. Once the county engineers issues  final approval, the process to make the land donated by Mr. Soinski and the new construction part of the dedicated road will continue. Mr. Timmons also announced that Mr. Soinski indicated that he intends to place a gate on the vacated portion of the road to deter trespassing.

In zoning, Zoning Inspector Joe Pinti reported he will be posting his hours of availability on the township website when it is completed. In addition, he and Richard Gano are working on updating zoning forms to be more user-friendly. He will also be researching a potential zoning violation where the landowner may be using an unauthorized manufactured home as a residence. Finally, the board is still waiting for answers concerning funding  the removal of two non-residential buildings in the township that are in very poor condition and pose potential safety threats.

Richard Gano announced that Larry Cogley has completed his presentation concerning drainage in the cemetery and will be presenting it to the trustees at an upcoming meeting.

Dann Timmons announced that the fire district has not made any decisions concerning possible action since the Village of Windham terminated dispatching after agreeing to provide the service to the fire district through 2019. The inaction of the board stems from two members,himself and the village council representative,  having conflict of interest, and the unavailability of one board member due to illness. That one board member was George Bengtson who, sadly, just passed away. It is now the responsibility of the village council to name a village resident as his replacement. After discussions with the assistant prosecutor, Mr. Timmons suggested that the trustees could pass a resolution to waive conflict of interest that would allow Mr. Timmons to participate in the discussion and vote on a course of action by the fire board. Brian Miller and Richard Gano agreed and the resolution was adopted.

In other business, the Ohio National Guard’s Camp Ravenna Joint Military Training Site was selected as one of five possible sites for a missile defense site. The Missile Defense Agency, which operates under the authority of the U.S. Department of Defense, will be briefing local elected officials on August 5, 2014 at Reed Memorial library prior to a meeting open to the public. Brian Miller will attend on behalf of the township.

The Windham Township Trustees meet on the first Thursday of each month at the Windham Township Hall, however, the August meeting has been cancelled. The Trustees will next meet on September 4, 2014 at 7:00 pm.

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Ravenna - The Woodlands at Robinson recently held a free community carnival on July 26th. The carnival was sponsored by Clear Path Home Health, Crossroads Hospice, Dean’s Funeral Home, Dr. David Uhall, J & J Mobile Music, NEAS Ambulance Inc. and Saber Healthcare.

Highlights of the event included a visit from Slider, The Cleveland Indians Mascot who arrived via fire truck accompanied by the Ravenna City and Ravenna Twp. Fire Departments. The event was also attended by the Hiram Police Dept. and the Ohio State Patrol. Unfortunately, the weather didn’t cooperate to allow for the Life flight visit and outdoor movie that were planned.

Children enjoyed the other activities; face-painting, bouncy house, inflatable slide, and carnival games, and the predator safety demonstration. The DJ was also a big hit, allowing Slider to lead some line dances for the crowd.

The first annual event turned out to be a great success and planning has begun for the 2nd annual event next summer.

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Butterfly Hike:

· Annual Butterfly Count for Towner’s Woods, conducted by the “Chrysalis in Time” the Northeast Ohio Chapter of NABA (North American Butterfly Association). 10:00 a.m. August 23rd.

·  Led by Judy Semroc and Larry Rosche, naturalists with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History

· Collect and learn about butterflies as well as dragonflies and other interesting nature finds

· If you like, bring your own net, insect container, water bottle, insect repellent, etc.

·  Appropriate for all ages, we’ll start on the PORTAGE Hike and Bike Trail at Towner’s Woods, and then hit the Butterfly Trail.

·   We’ve had terrific weather every year for this!

 

Bat Program:

·   At Towner’s Woods Friday evening August 22, 8:00.

·  Get up close and personal as you learn about the species and lives of our local bats, and their importance to our ecosystem

· Presented by our friends at Davey Resource Group and volunteer “Batman” Mike Johnson, they will collect bats by mist netting across the trail

· Bring insect repellent and flashlight if you like.

 

Pre-registration is NOT required for either of these events

 

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Arrrooooo!

Arrr00000!

I saw a coyote out in the wild western edge of Portage County.  It’ll be bucking broncos and tumbleweeds next, by gum!

The occasion was a “two-fer” local attraction activity, as the Kent Lions held their annual corn roast at Beckwith’s Orchard and farm market ( I’m a die-hard Monroe’s Orchard and Farm Market customer myself, so it was all about new horizons)AND the Portage County Park District was inviting the public to step off on the Portage Bike and Hike Trail which just happens to pass near there off Lake Rockwell Rd.  Great opportunity to chow down on an iconic summer treat—not to mention the fresh-baked peach and apple pies—then walk off a few calories and learn a few things along the popular(and now supported) trail.  Such a deal!

So, we’re off from the information board at the trailhead, led by our intrepid volunteer naturalist, Joe Malmisur, heading for another info board near Breakneck Creek(complete with a display explaining how the stream got its name); it was about a two-mile trek in store for us.  We’re getting the lowdown on what kind of trees are along the trail, what kinds of flowers are in bloom, which ones are invasives, which are not, the various insects whizzing or fluttering by, miscellaneous tidbits of information on the whole outdoor scene.  Somebody said, “Is that a deer?”  Somebody else said, “Is that a dog?”  Somebody else said. “Is that a coyote?”  Just about everybody said, “Whoa! It is a coyote!”  So, of course, we all looked—the creature in question was maybe a hundred yards to the west– and the coyote looked back and crossed the trail a couple of times, not particularly alarmed, but apparently not interested in forming any lasting relationships with a bunch of pale faces in his territory.  Joe got out his binoculars and we could all try to get a better look before Mr. Wiley eventually decided that he had important business elsewhere.  Pretty cool!  How do you top that?

Well, it wasn’t exactly a downhill slide, even then, with few more fauna to accompany the flora.  We got an explanation for the behavior of the “Quaking” Aspen, a look at some galls; a couple of turkey vultures circled overhead checking to see if we had expired yet, ready to have us over for dinner—or just HAVE us for dinner.  We saw blackberry and black raspberry bushes, we listened for birds, we dodged bikers (What?  They think that they get to use this space too?), we looked at—and avoided– the poison ivy.

Ah, yes, the dreaded Toxicodendrons radicans, (also known as Rhus toxicodendrons or Rus radicans)…poison ivy to us rubes.  It sure is a healthy-looking plant, vigorous, even, and growing everywhere (It particularly likes edges of cleared spaces  where there are trees and shrubs to climb and more sunshine than deep in the forest, but anywhere will do).  Nobody got into that greenery but we did get some admonitory snippets of doggerel verse : “Don’t be a dope, don’t touch the hairy rope”, “Hairy vine, no friend of mine”, “Berries white, danger in sight”, “Leaflets three, leave it be”.  I do usually get at least a couple of itchy bumps per year but they’re almost certain to be little gifts from some cat or other who has spent time out frolicking in the shrubbery by the creek bank then wants to cuddle up with somebody inside.  That somebody is frequently me.

So…anyway…there will be more hikes of greater or lesser distance and difficulty over this late summer and fall—throughl November, I think—sponsored and led by the Portage County Park District and its volunteers (Joe Malmisur, Principal Factor)through six of the trails in the system(Some of them get  used more than once).  It’s the Wild Hikes Challenge, a program designed to encourage healthy recreation in the park system’s parks and trails; it’s a showcase for Portage County’s rich natural and cultural heritage.  It’s also likely to be  fun.  Individuals who complete 8 of the hikes—verified—will earn a hiking staff crafted by workers at The Hiram Farm.  Donations are suggested to cover costs.

Get the good on you.  Give it a try.   Take a hike.

 

Clarence-Henry

Hiram – There’s a new face on the block near the Hiram Professional Building. Hiram College Alumni and former football player Clarence Henry recently opened the Hub in the space formerly occupied by Da Bar. The new establishment takes its name from the business, which originally occupied the space in 1956. According to Henry, the name is meant to evoke an experience of a social gathering among friends. He hopes his venture provides that social networking experience to the surrounding business owners, community members and college students. Not surprising, since his opportunity at the Hub arose when Henry, a former bar manager, learned the location was available while visiting another local establishment. Originally from Florida, Henry and his family, his fiancé and three young children, now call Hiram home. In addition to being a business owner, Henry also plays football for the Ohio Golden Knights, the top ranked amateur football team in the Ohio Football League.

Since opening the Hub, Henry and his team of ten employees have added a pool table and dart league, and offers daily specials. On Tuesday Tequila Night, Henry boasts they serve the best margaritas in town. Each Friday is Ladies Night, with special prices on martinis, and special drink offerings for the men, as well. The Hub also boasts of having 10 beers on tap, from the standard Budweiser and Great Lakes, to Blue Moon, Alchemy Ale, and Guinness.

But wanting to be known as more than just a watering hole, the Hub will also be taking full advantage of its close proximity to Gionino’s Pizzaria by facilitating pizza, sub and wing orders to hungry Hub customers. In addition, Henry will soon be providing burgers from the recently re-opened Hiram Corner Store, and has plans to bring in local food trucks, O Loco Gringo and The Dogfather, who offer Mexican fare, as well as BBQ ribs and hot dog sandwiches — a perfect way to serve Hiram College students returning at the end of August. The Hub also has a DJ and plans to host karaoke, open mike night, and line dancing. To find out the latest news, be sure to follow the Hiram Hub on Facebook.

 

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This year’s 51sth Annual Ox Roast Fair the weekend of July 18-20 at St. Joseph’s in Mantua was a wonderful event despite some weather challenges. Mother Nature gave us a little bit of everything . . . a beautiful Friday, off & on showers for Saturday with cooler temps, and then a hot & humid Sunday. Crowds did not disappoint;  the fun and entertainment were delightful and the food was delicious, as usual. Folks from the surrounding area and even out of state visitors enjoyed the hospitality of the Parish Community of St. Joseph. Thank you to everyone who came out and supported, volunteered, promoted, donated, and worked this year’s great event. This annual parish fundraiser directly supports the educational and sacramental ministries of St. Joseph Parish.

The Fair’s raffle drawings were held at 9:30 p.m. on Sunday. For the event’s main raffle the 2nd prize of a $500 Kalahari Resort gift card was won by Nanette Van Auken of Mantua, and the top prize of $5,000 was awarded to Tom Gedeon of Garrettsville. A few lucky fair-goers were awarded prizes through the hourly drawings in which winners had to be present: Camille Bichsel, Deb Bukas, Gary Kwasny, and Amanda Willett.

The 50/50 raffle was held each day with the following prizes awarded: Friday – no winner ($$ rolled over to Saturday), Saturday ($1,351.00) – Marian Angus of Windham, Sunday ($597.50) – Anonymous of Hudson. The Knights of Columbus Women’s Auxiliary held a raffle for an RCA 46″ LED Flat-screen TV which went to Crystal Chevrier. Second prize of a Sports Basket went to Terry Frost. Proceeds from their raffle go towards furnishing the group’s “Christmas Family” with food and gifts for the entire family.

Now in it’s third year, the “Run of the Ox” 5K Run/Walk was held on Saturday morning with 82 participants despite steady showers. Coming out on top overall for the men were Pete Hannan, Jakab McConnell, and David Krause, and for the women were Rosalie Franek, Kira Edic, and Michelle Zuponcu. For a complete list of placement times, visit hmapromotions.net and click on race results.

A big thank you to event sponsors and donators: Oscar Brugmann Sand & Gravel, Coldwell Banker, Giant Eagle, University Dental of Garrettsville, Inc., F & S Automotive, Compass Packaging, Brooks & Stafford, Jake’s.

Another great crowd-pleaser was the Kiddie Tractor Pulls on Saturday. The Mantua Knights of Columbus donated their equipment for the little pullers and members helped run the event. Trophies were awarded to the following top winners. In the 4 & 5 age category, Colton Warnick, age 4 of Garrettsville, placed third, Matt Wright, age 5 of Butler, took second, and Dmitry Hruby, age 5 of Grafton, won the age level with his first place pull. For the 6 & 7 year olds, Sam Wright, age 7 of Butler, accomplished third place, Hank Winland, age 7 of Mantua, won second place, and Roxxy Bretz, age 7 of Mantua, beat them out for first place. The 8 & 9 year old level saw Kierra Lommler, age 8 of Streetsboro, placed third, Dominic Goff, age 8 of Shalersville, achieved second place, and Nathan Walker, age 8 of Shalersville, attained first place.

Sunday’s Frog Jumping Contest was a hopping good time. Congratulations to third prize winner Brandon Hall, age 8 of Kent, who was awarded $3.00, a stuffed frog toy, and an Ox Roast t-shirt, and to second prize winner Ally Clayman, age 10 of Mantua who won $5.00, a stuffed frog toy, and a t-shirt. First prize of $10.00, a stuffed frog toy, and a t-shirt was won by Brendan Fejes, age 9 of Mantua.

Thank you to all of our karaoke contest participants, our judges Tiffany Bolton, Skip (from Jake’s), Jason Stakowski, and a special thanks to Jake’s, the event’s sponsor. Congratulations to the following who came out on top! 1st ($200) – Connor Rowe, Mantua; 2nd ($100) – Mya, Ky, Mani & VV Hawkins/Whitehead, Ravenna; 3rd ($50) – Raymond Markward, Shalersville.

Girl Scout Troops assisted in collecting non-perishable products for Mantua’s community cupboard, the 4C’s on Sunday. They delivered canned goods and other items to the 4C’s who were most appreciative on behalf of those in need. As in years past, St. Joseph’s donated leftover food items to the Center of Hope in Ravenna who were most appreciative. In addition to the Girl Scouts several of our Parish Groups wish to thank all who supported their efforts at this year’s Fair. Members of the Knights of Columbus Council #3766 volunteer a tremendous amount of time helping with maintenance, set-up, and take-down as well as working throughout the Fair. Boy Scout Troop #575 members and their families continued delicious fund raising efforts with their Sausage Sandwich booth. This hard-working group of young men put forth a tremendous effort in helping with Fair set-up, cleaning the grounds, and take-down of the Fair. Members of Cub Scout Pack #3575 manned the Pop Booth once again this year. Thanks, guys! The Crestwood Band Boosters added to the Fair by handling the Dunking Booth to help raise funds for themselves and the parish. A similar agreement was made with the Crestwood Youth Wrestling group who did a terrific job assisting with parking on the grounds and with Aurora’s Our Lady of Perpetual Help Knights of Columbus Council #14186 who provided delicious kettle corn.

Trade booths at this year’s fair included: Carlton Harley-Davidson, Tupperware (Megan Starr), Judges Muldowney/Berger, Scentsy Wickless Candles, Shaffer Airbrushing, Mel Jabkul’s Crafts, Portage County Tea Party, Over The Line Productions (Caricatures), Ohio State Home Services, Inc., Crossroads Community Church, For Rednecks By Rednecks, M-Bellished Frames by CQPQ, Final Touch Construction, Bath Fitter, and University Hospital. Thank you to each of them for adding to the festivities. Our generous sponsors toward the fireworks display were 7 Up Bottling Group and Snapple Beverages.

A big thank you to a number of area businesses and individuals helped to sponsor our Truck, Tractor & Semi Pulls throughout the weekend: Special Moments Catering, Auburn Pipe, Aflac Insurance, Lyle Tayerle, Independent Agent, Auto Rehab, Jon Martin, Owner, Geauga Lake Auto Sales, Ferrara Electric (Joe Ferrara, owner), Lakeside Sand & Gravel, Penney’s Automotive, TL Service Center, F & S Automotive, Impressions Styling Studio (Gina Fischione), Acorn LPG (donating propane), Sunrise Springs (donating bottled water), Dr. Thomas Pesarchick, DDS, Osborn Landscaping, Industrial Connections, Kozsey Landscaping Service, My First  School, Aurora, Kodash Excavating, Mantua, Hiram House Salon & Day Spa (Tammy Lingro), Ittell Transportation (David Ittel, owner), and Central Petroleum Co. Visit the parish’s website for a complete list of pull results.

The Ox Roast Fair also wishes to thank several generous businesses who donated items for this year’s event: 7UP Bottling Group & Snapple Beverages; Sunrise Springs offered the bottled water used for making the Lemon Shake-Ups; Hermann’s Pickles of Garrettsville for several gallons of their delicious product; beer mug sponsors The Village Tavern, Carma Promotions, Lakeside Sand & Gravel, Jake’s, Oscar Brugmann Sand & Gravel, TL Service Center, Denny Herr & Sons Well & Pump, and Carlton Yarnell Chipping Service, LLC; raffle ticket printing costs were covered by McGinnis Amusements; Mantua Station Drug Co. helped with flyer printing expenses; and, Acorn LPG of Ravenna provided propane used throughout the weekend. St. Joseph’s would also like to express their appreciation to the Entertainment Stage sponsor, Carlton Harley-Davidson, to the Family Ox Land sponsor, Barky Mart, to the EMS Squad sponsor, Lakeside Sand & Gravel, and to this year’s Blessing of Bikes sponsor, The Village Tavern, and to anyone who donated or supported this year’s event in any way.

The Parish Community of St. Joseph’s looks forward to entertaining and meeting the Mantua community and beyond in 2015. Mark your calendars for the third weekend in July, 2015 (that’s the 17th, 18th & 19th) for St. Joseph’s 52nd Annual Ox Roast Fair. Be sure to visit their website, www.stjosephmantua.com, for complete details. They also have a Facebook page, St. Joseph’s Ox Roast Fair, with lots of photos and news.

Again, St. Joe’s thanks everyone who made this year’s Fair such a community success.

center-school

Mantua – One hundred years ago, children and teachers journeyed either on foot or in wagons, as the school bell chimed out each day at the Mantua Center School in Mantua Township. Over the years — through two World Wars and many generations of local families — the school remained, a central fixture within the township. Although the last group of students departed the building for the final time in 2004, students, teachers, community members, and even a special guest from Columbus will have the opportunity to go back to school, at least for a few hours, on Saturday, August 9th, from 1 to 4 pm.

Senator John Eklund will be speaking at Saturday’s special event. Eklund was a staunch supporter of the effort to get the building listed on the National Register of Historic Places, which occurred last fall. He represents Senate District 18, which includes Portage County and portions of Lake and Geauga Counties, and resides in Munson Township. In addition to Eklund’s remarks, the event will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the building, which was completed in 1914. Up through the 1940s, the school served grades one through twelve of the entire Township. At that time, it shifted enrollment to grades kindergarten through seven. Several of the school’s oldest alumni have been invited back to the event, and to meet Senator Eklund.

The Mantua Restoration Society, in conjunction with the Mantua Historical Society, is hosting the event on Saturday, to demonstrate what Carole Pollard refers to as, “the sweep of time the building has been through,” Both groups plan to have several exhibits throughout the building, highlighting world and local events that occurred throughout its century of life. In addition, a small classroom exhibit will showcase desks, materials, clothing and photos from the early life of the school. The event will include tours of the building, as well as  ice cream and cake to celebrate the building’s historic 100th birthday.

Part of the building’s history revolves around the school bell — the 1,500-pound bell that was originally purchased by the Township to be used as a civil defense bell. The bell is roughly three times the size of the one at the Township Hall. Apparently, it took quite an effort from Stamm Contracting to fix it in place at the top historic building. During a regular school day, the bell was rung at least four times, by pulling the bell rope located in the top floor landing.

Tom Rauber, who served as Principal from 1992 through 2004, was asked to contact the school’s former teachers and staff, to let them know of the momentous occasion. “There’s such a history there — It’s always neat to go back,” Rauber shared.  He’s been back to the school for various events, including the graduation party of a former student. Rauber’s student attended Center School, as did his parents. They chose to rent the gymnasium to host their son’s high school graduation party.

When the school closed in 2004, Rauber and his staff and students marked the occasion, in part, by sharing the stories of former teachers and students. As the final school day ended, the group rang the historic bell 90 times, once for each consecutive year the school was in operation. The interviews, as well as the rest of the closing ceremony, were recorded on DVD, and will be shared at Saturday’s event. At Saturday’s event, the bell will again be rung — and perhaps you or someone you know will have the opportunity to help ring it.

Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club members wished their local Rotary Student Exchange participant, Rachel Schwan, good luck and Godspeed on her adventure in Thailand for the coming school year.  They also welcomed visitor Skip Schweitzer,  columnist for The Villager.

Current items of business included : Carol Donley’s certification as a local student exchange co-ordinator, the Kent club is seeking volunteers for their yearly assistance to arriving foreign students at Kent State University, Tom Collins reported attending the Rotary Day ball game at the Cleveland Indians’ Progressive Field on August 1, with a special welcome and recognition by the Tribe announcer , updating of signatures on financial documents for banking purposes, reminder about the invitation to tour the new Garfield Elementary School project on August 11,checking steak orders for the steak fry on August 11 at 6:00.

Tom Collins reported on the Headwaters Trail project grant application to District 6630, citing assistance from Steve Zabor of the Mantua-Shalersville club and possible involvement of other clubs in the undertaking.  Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary is already working on beautifying the signs at the entrances to the village of Garrettsville as well as encouraging the increased use of the Headwaters Trail.  At least one of the project submissions by Kent State University students focused on promoting walking in the village and this might be something to build on and present to developers to keep the “small town feel” of the village.  There will be a meeting with the planners on the Portage County Park District and G-H Rotary will bringing input and ideas.

Dues are due.  Membership is open to all.  Meetings are held on Mondays at noon in Cal’s II.  Come check out the locals.  You could be the spark To Light Up Rotary.

 

 Windham – Windham Park Restoration Committee is holding 5K Run/Walk at the Arsenal on September 13, 2014 at 10am. Check in will begin at 9am. The cost is $30 for walker/runner older than 10 years old, $15 for less than 10 years old. All participants must pre-register by August 22, 2014 per arsenal regulations. No race day registrations will be accepted per arsenal regulations.

Prizes will be awarded to the top three finishers.  All participants will receive a t-shirt. To obtain a registration form, one can copy it from the Facebook page (Windham Park Restoration Committee) and email it in windhamparkrestorationcommittee@yahoo.com or one can call Deann at (330) 766-3477 or Katie at (234) 600-1232 for more information. Parking is available at Windham High School at 9539 Bauer Road. Runners/walkers will be entering the Arsenal at the south gate near the high school.

Please note that roller blades, skate boards or bicycles are not permitted. Proceeds from the event will go towards the restoration of the park.

Garrettsville – Garrettsville Police Department Fill a Cruiser with School Supplies will be held on August 16th.

The Garrettsville Police Department will be collecting school supplies for People Tree on August 16th from 9:00 am – 2:00 pm at Family Dollar (Sky Plaza), 8287 Windham St., Garrettsville. The supplies will be distributed to families within the area needing school supplies for the upcoming school year. There will also be a cash box on hand and all money collected will go to People Tree.

Items requested are:  #2 Pencils, erasers, crayons, markers, colored pencils, dry erase markers, highlighters, pens, rulers (standard & metric), scissors, glue sticks, white glue, small supply boxes, zipper supply pouches, over the hear headphones, book bags, spiral notebooks, 3 ring binders, composition books, loose leaf paper, 3×5 index cards, page protectors, pocket folders, sandwich bags, antibacterial wipes, boxes of tissues, brown lunch bags and anything else school related.

Garrettsville – The $5M Straight A Grant from the state provided the James A. Garfield Schools with some exceptional opportunities.  With these exceptional opportunities came exceptional challenges. To date, I am happy to report that these challenges have been met. The project is on time and under budget.

Regardless of the obstacles, the addition is on schedule to open for students on August 26.  Here are the latest developments on each component of the grant.

Construction

Our Design/Builder, Hammond Construction, and all of the subcontractors have worked tirelessly to ensure that we receive our building on time.  More importantly,  they are delivering this community a building of excellent quality.

We are also proud to have local contractors working on the project.  Most notably are our electricians, Scotchman Electric, and our painters, Doug Seaman Decorating.

The addition will include 8 classrooms, 2 state-of- the-art science labs, 2 special education classrooms and a professional development center.  The professional development space will comfortably seat 120 adults and contain digital projection equipment for presentations or trainings. While this space will offer a flexible instructional space for students, the district will make this space available to the public for meetings. The project also includes a renovation to the office area, creating a more functional space as well as a secure entrance for visitors and a dual serving line in the cafeteria.

Last February, a “Campus of Excellence Oversight Committee” was established to oversee all aspects of the project.  Over 40 individuals from the community have been actively involved making decisions about the addition.  This group consisted of parents, business owners, community members and school employees.  They have met throughout the project and provided the input necessary to construct a building we can all be proud of for the next 50 years.

While our students will be in the building on August 26, we will be planning an official ribbon cutting ceremony for late September or early October.

Finally, through careful selection of contractors and good planning, the project is coming in under budget. Savings will be used to invest in three areas.  Efficiency items such as HVAC controls and energy efficient windows have been purchased and will save taxpayer money over time.  Security items such as exterior cameras and keypad entry doors will provide for student safety. Instructional upgrades include an enhanced wireless network and 210 laptops on carts for student to use in grades K-6.

Technology

Laptops for staff have been distributed and training is scheduled for next week. Between August 12 and the start of school over 650 laptops will be distributed to students in grades 7-12 (see page 8 for details).  The wireless infrastructure has been upgraded on the entire campus and is ready to support a new era of 21st Century learning.

Partnerships

The Portage County Educational Service Center (ESC) and the Greater Cleveland YMCA are moving forward with their plans to bring their services to the community. The YMCA has brought youth soccer and flag football to our community and already has over sixty students signed up to participate.  The ESC will open two preschool classrooms in the retiring Intermediate School this fall.

With the construction project, technology initiatives and new partnerships developing as planned and on schedule, we have a great deal to celebrate.  The pride of our community continues to drive us towards excellence. Go G-Men!

 

Eight locally owned quilt stores are working together again to help local food banks and to raise awareness about the joys of quilting.

The Fourth Annual Charming Quilt Shop Tour begins Thursday, Aug. 21, and runs through Saturday, Aug. 30, at eight sewing and quilting stores in northeast Ohio and western Pennsylvania.

“Hoppers,” as the shoppers are called, have 10 days to visit all eight quilt stores. They will receive free gifts and treats just for walking through the door of each of the stores. A portion of their passport or entrance fee into the tour goes to help local food banks.

“The Charming Shop Hop is an event for quilters,” said Megen Wierzbicki, from Megen’s Quilt Parlor in Albion, Pa. “Different people from all over flock to our quilt shops to see what each shop has that is different and exciting and creative.”

Megen’s Quilt Parlor is located in her grandmother’s former home, down a country lane in Albion. For the 10 days of the shop hop, 8 quilts stretch across the long fence leading to the shop. More quilts hang on fences and chairs leading to the flower lined steps to the shop. “We hang quilts from the ceiling and do other fun things just to make this event special for our visitors,” said Megen.

Quilt shop hops have been happening all over the country for many years and each shop hop is different.

In the Charming Shop Hop Tour, shoppers buy a passport for $3 at any of the eight participating stores and receive a free tote bag for joining the tour. Passports are on sale now.

At each shop during the 10 days of the tour, shoppers receive a free quilt block pattern. Each shop makes up their quilt block into a project that will be unveiled the first day of the tour. In addition, each participant receives free fabric squares, a surprise treat and opportunities to win many give-aways.

The grand prize is a new sewing machine valued at $800. Second prize is a Stella Desktop Lamp valued at $258. Two third prizes — each a set of Karen Kay Buckley sewing scissors valued at $78 — will be awarded. Eight $100 value gift baskets and eight $150 dollar baskets will be awarded.

Sewing manufacturers from around the country have donated bundles of fabric, patterns and sewing tools for the event. Anyone visiting all eight stores and turning in their completed passport receives a silver sewing charm for finishing and becomes eligible for many of the give-away prizes.

Participating shops include: Cottonpickers of Chardon; Craft Cupboard of Middlefield; Just Quilt It of Champion; Megen’s Quilt Parlor of Albion; Olive Grace Studios of Fowler; Quilter’s Fancy of Cortland; Tiny Stitches of Middlefield; and Village Quilts of Canfield.

Questions on this press release call Cindy Oravecz at 330-307-3272 or cindyo@quiltersfancy.com

 

peachesGarrettsville –  The peach crop throughout Ohio is the pits this summer, but that won’t put a dent in the annual Peach Social and Classic Car Cruise sponsored by the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce. Cruise Night at the Garrettsville-Freedom-Nelson Fire Station (8035 Elm St.)  which  will proceed as planned, 5-8pm on Saturday, August 9 (Rain Date: August 10).

Mayor Rick Patrick envisioned the first peach social/car cruise about 15 years ago, and it has proven to draw the biggest crowds of the cruising season, year after year. He reports that “last year’s peach social proved to be incredibly popular, with over 50 homemade pies, 15 gallons of ice cream and a ton of delicious peaches served over the course of the evening. This year we are anticipating an even larger turnout and expect to go through at least 60 peach pies.”

While Chamber members typically supply all the homemade pies for the social, reinforcements from the community are being sought this time around. Please call Mayor Patrick if you plan to contribute a pie. Peach pies can be dropped off at the GFN Fire Department at 4:30pm on Friday, August 9.

While Monroe’s Orchard on Pioneer Trail in Hiram traditionally supplies the event with their own peaches, they — like fruit growers throughout Ohio — have no peach crop this summer, due to sub-zero temperatures following an unseasonable thaw in January which killed off tree buds. However, Monroe’s is coming through with peaches from another orchard in eastern Pennsylvania which escaped the brutal cold of last winter.

Local grocer Sky Plaza IGA supplies the ice cream for the slices of pie and bowls of peaches served at the social. Anyone who would like to assist in the peeling and cutting of fresh peaches on Friday are welcome to Mayor Patrick’s home at 8174 South Park Street, starting at 6pm August 8.

Center Stage Band will lend to the atmosphere with their range of live feel-good tunes from rock-n-roll and Top 40 hits, to Motown, R&B, oldies, and beach music. Enjoy the tunes as you savor the peaches, visit your neighbors, meet new friends and check out 200 or so classic and collectible cars on display.

Winter may have killed off the local peach crop, but here’s a little slice of summer we can sink our teeth into before the kids head back to school and autumn falls upon us.

 

inspector-crestGarrettsville – Technology is today’s pencil. It is becoming an integral part of teaching and learning, and thanks to the $5 Million Straight A Grant, this year every James A. Garfield Student in grades 7-12 will be receiving an HP Chromebook. The devices are being provided to students as learning tools that will allow them to create, collaborate, communicate and engage in critical thinking activities.

Dates have been scheduled for parents to come in with their children to receive their laptops over the coming weeks. Our goal is to distribute all laptops before the first day of school on August 26.

Insurance can be purchased for the device for $23 annually that will cover theft, drops, spills or natural disaster. Families may opt out of the insurance and assume responsibility for the replacement cost ($253) of the device.  Checks should be made payable to the James A. Garfield Local Schools. Parents wishing to purchase insurance for their child’s device should bring their payment to their scheduled pickup time.

 

Pickup times will be as follows:

 

Tuesday, August 12 (6pm) – Seniors

Wednesday, August 13 (6pm) – Juniors

Thursday, August 14 (6pm) – Sophomores

 

Tuesday, August 19 (6pm) – Freshmen

Wednesday, August 20 (6pm) – 8th Grade

Thursday, August 21 (6pm) – 7th Grade

 

Friday, August 22 (6pm) – Makeup Day (anyone who missed their date)

Monday, August 25 (7pm) – Makeup Day (anyone who missed their date)

 

Laptops will be distributed in the Iva Walker Auditorium. A brief presentation for parents and students will follow to cover expectations and procedures for the devices.

Questions can be direct to Jen Mulhern at 330.527.2151.

 

photo by Benjamin Coll Photography

photo by Benjamin Coll Photography

Garrettsville – FACET Salon and Day Spa is pleased to announce the newest addition to its staff of visionary artists. Shannon Aldrich, a graduate of Crestwood Schools and The Paul Mitchell School of Cleveland, joins a team of seven talented stylists at Rachelle King’s Garrettsville location. Shannon assists in providing the salon and spa services FACET clients have come to enjoy including: cuts, color, manicures and pedicures, massages, and waxing services. Spray tans and a tanning bed and dry sauna are also part of FACET’s offerings. Through August 31st, save 25% on your Cut & Color Service when you book your appointment with Shannon. For more details on this promotion or any of FACET’s services, please call 330-527-4347. FACET Salon & Day Spa is located within the TLC Complex at 1 Memory Lane, Garrettsville, Ohio. Rachelle King is a National Educator for Paul Mitchell Systems, and the owner/operator of three popular salons in Ohio including: The Studio in Ohio City; and Studio 3 of Dublin.

Hudson2Exercise your legs and exercise your mind!

This summer dozens of locals have played history buff for the day thanks to the Hudson Library & Historical Society’s walking tour series led by Library Archivist Gwen Mayer. One of the tours, the Scandals of Hudson, features mischievous tales of the most – you guessed it – scandalous in nature (well, depending who you ask – some are actually relatively tame in today’s times). The first stop on this pleasant promenade rocks the reputation of the quaint community almost immediately as Gwen explains the building behind the iconic clock tower has a long record of housing banks, one of which once played host to an embezzlement scheme that took residents quite a while to recover from when it was discovered. More secrets surround this section of the settlement known as Brewster’s Row, named after the original store’s well-to-do owner and builder of several of the structures along that piece of land. What did Mr. Brewster do that made him think the Hudson Green was his very own front yard? And why did he continually expand his empire right on down the street adding one formation after another? Catching clandestine clues such as these is only part of the fun to be had during this intriguing event.

Depending on the topic of the tour, the historical hike around Hudson is approximately a mile and a half so patrons will want to wear comfortable walking shoes. Our outing was just over an hour and a half of scenic storytelling and there were plenty of chances to sit for a spell or two during the easy-going afternoon.

A resident of Garrettsville who has been digging up Hudson history as part of the Library for nearly twenty years, Gwen is engaging, informative and informal, encouraging participants to ask questions and chime in, adding to the anecdotal atmosphere. Bits of true crime gleaned from the library archives chronicle tales about other long-ago (and not so long ago) inhabitants including another wealthy man, James Ellsworth, who became the town’s most well-loved benefactor and several ways he influenced the growth of the area, not only in architecture but in attitude as well.

How a polar explorer once on a US postage stamp is connected to a speakeasy when Hudson was a dry community even before Prohibition? What happened to make the town’s clock tower mouse one of the quite recent scandalous “tails”? You’ll just have to sign up for these mini expeditions to find out!

The tours are: Disasters of Hudson (August 2nd at 2pm), Architectural History (August 4th or October 7th at 6:45pm), Kit Homes (August 11th at 6:45pm), Scandals of Hudson (September 2nd at 6:45pm), Underground Railroad (September 25th at 6:45pm) and, just in time for the fright season that is Halloween, Spooky Hudson (October 28th at 6:45pm).

Registration in advance is required as tours are limited to about 25 participants. To secure your spot, stop by the library, call (330) 653-6658, or visit the website at www.hudsonlibrary.org and click the register link on the event of your choice. (A waitlist option is available in case a selected tour is already full.)

 

photo courtesy of Kim Breyley

photo courtesy of Kim Breyley

Middlefield –  Early Sunday evening, storms pounded Middlefield Village and the surrounding areas, drenching them with approximately five inches of rain in an hour and a half. The heavy rain fall caused flash flooding, that took residents by surprise, forcing nine families to be evacuated from their homes.

The hardest hit area was Grove Manor Apartments on Grove Street in Middlefield near Mineral Lake Park. Eight families were stranded by the rising waters, which called for immediate evacuation. The fire department was on hand with a boat to assist residents who needed to evacuate. According to Lieutenant Anderson from the Middlefield Village Fire Department,(MVFD) the firemen assisted eight families in the village and one in the township with evacuation, due to rising waters.  There were no injuries or loss of life, including animals. Anderson said the MVFD received assistance with the storm emergencies from Burton, Windsor, Troy and Parkman Departments.

Although the biggest area hit was the Grove Street region, the entire village suffered from flooding issues. The intersection of State Routes 87 and 608, in the heart of the village was under water for some time as well. Other area businesses that suffered minimal flooding:  Wal-Mart had flooding in the loading dock area, the Good News, Rite Aid, Great Lakes Outdoor Supply and Briar Hill suffered lower level flooding along with many other businesses. Also, many resident experienced severe basement flooding as well.

All day Monday, the County EMA, the state and the Red Cross were assessing the damage from Sundays’ storm, while residents and businesses attended to the clean-up.

 

Garrettsville – Rodger Pettit was a visitor and, unexpectedly, the program for the evening at the July 21, 2014 meeting of the James A. Garfield Historical Society.  His original intention was to present information on the proposed and planned Nelson Veterans’ Memorial, its history and current status.  The memorial is to be placed on the grounds of the former Nelson School on the east side of the Circle.  It will consist of an octagonal patio/plaza with a square gazebo surrounded by upright plaques representing the Armed Services of the United States, engraved with the names of service personnel from Nelson (Criteria for  such markers vary with each venue.  In this case, eligibility is extended to those that have lived in and/or were born in Nelson Township.  The patio/plaza area  will be composed of pavers of several sizes which may be purchased with an engraved message, the committee retaining editorial  final decision on the inscriptions.  (see drawing on display in Villager window)

Donations are being sought.  Grants and the possibility of government support are on the radar.  Anyone who would like to be a factor in the effort is welcome to make a contribution.  Two individuals from the township—Garland Randall, descendant of the founding family of Nelson, and Bob Rose– have been mentioned by Rodger as part of the inspiration for the current push to complete the monument at this time.  Monuments are built to last; the heroes they commemorate cannot be with us as long.  Now is the time to get this done.

THEN, in his inimitable style, Rodger went on to display an antique map of the school districts in Nelson Township prior to the pressure from the State of Ohio Department of Education to consolidate and, eventually, to be joined to the school system of Garrettsville.  He was able to find only one structure of that era still in place—his mother’s house.  Topics then ranged from Amish schools in the area to the abandoned church on Silica Rd.(Two types of church law got tangled up in that one), the doors on the Nelson Central School being constructed so as to open out  because of the tragic Collinwood School fire in the Cleveland neighborhood in 1908.  Fascinating tales of local lore prompted reminiscences and questions and interest in a host of topics.  Plans for the memorial are on display at the Weekly Villager.  The society will be making a purchase of an 8×8 paver for the monument.

Members reported a good turn-out during the open hours of the SummerFest( Next regular Open House hours are on August 2 from 10:00 to 2:00).  Permission has been granted to use the Municipal Building for the craft show during Christmas Walk.  Brochures are on the to-do list.  The annual summer picnic is scheduled for August 18 at Nelson Ledges, 6:00—potluck at Buggy Pass, depicted on an antique postcard (Remember them?). In case of rain by 4:00, the rain date will be Tuesday, August 19.  A picnic pavilion may be available.  Stay tuned.

Youngest member, Grace Edwards, suggested that some thought be given to a Historical Bake Sale for next SummerFest…sounds possible…and tasty.  Jim Mayer raised the possibility of a new line of historical postcards , using the society’s photo archives and possibly some from the recent fire.  JAGHS currently has twenty-five members; you could be one of them.  Meetings are held on the third Monday of the month in the Mott Building on Main St. Garrettsville, 7:30 p.m.  Y’all come, now!

 

Hiram Twp. – It was noted that that as a part of the partnership between Hiram Township and the Hiram Village Police Department, Hiram Police Officers have begun patrolling in Hiram Township. The purpose of these patrols is to enforce traffic violations and provide a visible deterrent to prevent crime within the township. These services are supplemental to the services currently provided by the Portage County Sheriff’s Office.

Assignments for Hiram Township police services will be directed by Chief Ed Samec of the Hiram Police Department, who stated, “Hiram Township residents will still contact the Portage County Sheriff’s Office to report crimes and will continue to have deputies as their primary law enforcement contact.” Samec continued, “Having this partnership, Hiram Police Officers will have the ability to concentrate efforts in particular geographical areas where crime and traffic violations persist.”

According to Trustee Kathy Schulda, in the first 30 days the agreement has been in place, Hiram Police officers made two stops of non-residents for OVI (Operating a Vehicle Impaired), and have issued one ticket to a driver traveling 65 MPH in a 35 MPH zone. In addition, they have issued three warnings to other drivers, and multiple notices to drivers of four-wheelers on township roads.

Samec noted that Hiram Township residents should contact their township trustees with concerns related to continued traffic violations and areas of concerns, as complaints will be assessed for Hiram Police Department’s township patrol duties. This agreement was achieved through cooperation between Hiram Village Council, and Hiram Township Trustees.

Per Road Supervisor Tom Matota, ODOT has issued a permit to construct a driveway at 6352 State Route 82, the site of the new property owned by the township. ODOT has, however, noted its “concern for site distance” of the chosen location. Matota also noted that the site is clear of underground utilities, making excavation a less difficult process. In other news, Matota noted that the crew has been, “working around raindrops,” to do chip and seal work on township roads. He also noted that at 12 miles, it’s more chip and seal work than the township crew has done in previous years.

Lastly, trustees went into executive session, per Ohio Revised Code regulations. Afterwards, Trustee Kathy Schulda announced that Township Fiscal Officer Stan Carlisle resigned his position as of July 18th. In his place, trustees have hired former Hiram Township Fiscal Officer Diane Rohde. Rohde served as Hiram Township’s Fiscal Officer upon the retirement of Fiscal Officer Dough Brewer, in June of 2011. Rohde will serve the remainder of Carlisle’s term, which expires next fall, according to Schulda. Meanwhile, the township has an extension of six weeks to get their 2015 operating budget submitted to Auditor of State David Yost.

The next meeting of the Hiram Township Trustees will be on Tuesday, August 5th at 7 pm. in the Township Hall.

 

The MVGC will meet on Monday, August 4, at noon.  At this meeting, Judy Novak-Hrdy, Master Gardener, will be showing us several examples of Fairy Gardens, and teach us how they are made.  Judy will also tell us stories about the fairies that reside in those Fairy Gardens.  If you are interested in joining us, and learning more about Fairy Gardens please contact Lea Lazar @ 330-274-0614, or Diane Lottig @ 330-274-2868.

The purpose of the club is to stimulate the love and knowledge of gardening among amateurs, and to aid in the protection of native plants, trees, and to encourage civic planting.  In saying that, the members of the MVCG would like to thank everyone for their support, at our bake sale booth, at Art on the Hill.  It was a great success!

Cheese

Ravenna - The Portage County Gardeners recently held a mozzarella cheese making workshop. Fifteen people took the class instructed by Marilyn Tyger and Helena Parry.

After cooking up the milk and other cheese making ingredients, the group had to persevere to get  the curds to finally process into cheese.  Sarah Perdue and Mary Jo Ryan were given a round of applause as they finally got their curds to form into some cheese.  All of the participants were given cheese making ingredients and recipes to take home to make their own cheese.  The instructors also provided samples of mozzarella to taste along with fresh garden tomatoes and zucchini  from the Parry garden. Tyger prepared her  dip mixes for tasting as well.

The next event of the PCGC is a canning workshop on Aug. 9 from 10 a.m. to noon.

Also on Aug. 9 the PCGC will hold a Mink Shed/Garage Sale from 9am.- 2p.m. Slate roof shingles, basket reed, crafting supplies,bottle tree kits and much more will be available.  For further information call Diane Jendrisak 330-673-4982 or Mary Jo Ryan 330-296-3633.

Portage County – The Digital Bookmobile National Tour (www.digitalbookmobile.com) will showcase the free eBook service from Portage County District Library at the Aurora Memorial Library on Friday, August 22 from 12:00 pm until 6:00 pm. At these free events, readers of all ages will learn how to access eBooks from the library through interactive demonstrations and high-definition instructional videos. A gadget gallery featuring all the latest portable reading devices will help visitors discover portable devices that are compatible with the library’s download service. The library is located at 115 East Pioneer Trail in Aurora. Call 330-562-6502 for more information.

Assistant Library Director Corrine Alldridge says, “Portage County District Library has offered Overdrive downloadable service since 2008.  When we learned that the Digital Bookmobile was coming back to Ohio, we were very excited about this unique way to share and showcase our digital service.  People who are curious about the whole eBook phenomena will love having a chance to play with gadgets and see what the library has to offer.”

Portage County District Library card holders can also check out digital titles anytime, anywhere by visiting http://overdrive.portagelibrary.org. Library patrons can take advantage of the service 24/7 when they visit the library’s website. From there, they can browse the growing collection of bestselling, new release, and classic titles, and check out a digital title with a valid Portage County District Library card. Once the digital titles have been checked out, they can enjoy them in the browser or transfer them to their computer or a supported mobile device. Many audio titles can also be burned to audio CD. At the end of the lending period, titles will automatically expire and are returned to the digital collection. There are never any late fees or damaged items.

The Digital Bookmobile is housed inside an 18-wheel tractor-trailer. This 74-foot community outreach vehicle is a high-tech update of the traditional bookmobile that had served communities for decades. The vehicle is equipped with broadband Internet-connected PCs, high definition monitors, premium sound systems, and a variety of portable media players, all of which help visitors explore Portage County District Library’s digital service. Interactive learning stations give visitors an opportunity to search the library’s digital media collection, use supported mobile devices, and sample eBooks and audiobooks.

The Digital Bookmobile is a service of the Portage County District Library and is operated by Overdrive, Inc. To check out digital books and more, visit http://overdrive.portagelibrary.org. For more information about other library programs and services, visit Portage County District Library online at www.portagelibrary.org.

Busy time for the Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club at their meeting on July 28, 2014 at Cal’s II.  The monthly list of program responsibility was reviewed.  President Delores  McCumbers spoke of the benefits of the PETS (President Elect Training Sessions) program and of a Rotary Honors Vets event coming up in central Ohio.  Facilities-use papers have been filed for Family Week 2015 activities  February 22-28, at Garfield High School and Elementary School—Caitlin Lawless will be the Trail Boss.  August 18 is the date  for  Chris Schuerer  to appear to be the” face”…and the “ears”… of the YMCA   which will be opening its new facility and operations at the Park Avenue building, formerly the Garfield Intermediate School (which has now moved to the St. Rte 88 campus).  He will be seeking input on desired programs for the community and giving a brief outline of what has been planned so far.  Rotary pins for the soon-departing (August 6) exchange student, Rachel Schwan, have been received, with banners to follow.  On the horizon for the club are the October trash pick-up between Garrettsville and Hiram and the Reverse Raffle in November…never too soon to begin planning.  And in that same vein, some possibilities for new/re-thought activities for Family Week were proposed and existing features reviewed.   Thoughts about local projects circulated, including community walks,  ideas for promoting use of the Headwaters Trail,  pitching in with the Kent club to assist incoming international students at the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store,  a Portage Cluster joint project of some sort—plenty of opportunities.

Jim Irwin came with pieces from his collection of historical documents—photo, newspaper, club program folder, handwritten thank you note—for all to peruse and enjoy.  He also had memories of some of the individuals making up the club in the past.

The annual Steak Fry will be on August 11 at 6:00.  The noon meeting will not be held but there will be a tour of the new Intermediate School addition and Elementary School renovation which WILL be opened on August 20.  Lunch-on-the-fly…dinner in the green.

Lisa Muldowney was the program for the meeting, giving a brief personal  picture of herself as a Garrettsville native, a Rootstown resident, the mother  to six, a member of significant local boards (Ravenna Chamber, Coleman Services) and the head of the Garrettsville Branch of the Middlefield Banking Company.  The bank was founded in 1901 and prides itself on being community-oriented and capable of creative thinking and operation in financial matters.  Not every bank can take loans for Amish buggies in stride.   She has a community-involved staff which can be seen, not just behind the counter but also out interacting with the people the bank serves.  It offers basic banking services for home, commercial and personal financing, as well as having a “green” outlook on emerging business possibilities.  Coming soon—home mortgage with a 30-day turnaround.  How’s that for horse-and-buggy dealings?

Next meeting August 4.  You’re invited.

Garrettsville - Many watched from afar as the historical Buckeye Block went from being beautifully restored buildings to ashes on March 22, 2014. Being the small town that Garrettsville is, this fire touched most of the community, however the building owners and business owners were especially affected. Mike Maschek, who owned a majority of the block was deeply moved. When reminiscing about that day, he clearly remembers what impacted him the most. “It wasn’t the buildings burning down, but the people impacted by that event. People carrying water, sub sandwiches, McDonald’s, pizza and water to the firefighters and workers as they tried putting an end to a fire that didn’t want to stop….that’s what impacted me. I only lost a building, but the business owners lost their livelihoods and the citizens of Garrettsville lost their memories. Buildings can always be rebuilt to replace what was lost. My intention is to do so.”

Maschek is gearing up for an exciting new adventure doing what he does best: restoring the streets. He is currently working with different land designers, students and professor from Kent State and the village to recreate not only the lost history, but the future history of Garrettsville.

Maschek is not one to ignore great roots that have been planted. Garrettsville has rich roots of history that Maschek is determined to keep alive. When talking about the future for the Buckeye Block, he says, “I believe that we are on the verge of seeing a new Garrettsville, but not losing the charm of the old one. I am thoroughly enjoying working with the mayor, council and the planning commission. A town is not great because of its buildings; it’s great because of its people. This town is filled with great people.”

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Newton Falls – Newton Falls Kiwanis Club announces a new race route for its annual Labor Day 4-Mile Run and 2-Mile Walk.  On September 1, rain or shine, runners and walkers will begin and end near Faces Lounge, the registration site.  The course will feature school property and pass through the historic covered bridge.

Bob Wujcik, Kiwanis president, hopes for a great turnout in this anniversary year.  The club has donated over $5000 in each of the last few years to the Senior Citizens Van.  They hope to contribute at least as much to the van program this year, and also have additional funds to benefit their two scholarships.  Sponsors help offset the set-up and advertising costs, and racers and walkers will directly benefit the van program.

By registering early, participants will get a shirt and a registration fee that is less than the day-of-race fee.   There will be a post-race meal thanks to Faces Lounge.

To see a map of the new course, prizes, shirt offers, and the online registration form, go to www.gopherarun.com.  At that site are also photos from last year’s race.  To help sponsor the race or to get information for your group to help on race day, contact president Bob at (330) 872-3854 or race director Cassie at (330) 219-9321.

If you attended James A. Garfield (at any point), or Freedom, Nelson or Garrettsville Schools prior to the 1951 consolidation…. you are! JAG Alumni are cordially invited to the James A. Garfield Alumni Banquet which will be held on September 20, 2014 at JamesA. Garfield Elementary School. The banquet is a wonderful opportunity to reacquaint with past classmates, enjoy a delicious meal and entertainment from the award-winning James A. Garfield Band. Please contact Helen Louise Bouts at 330-309-2734 to make your reservation. Your reservation can be mailed to: James A. Garfield Alumni Banquet, P.O. Box 93, Garrettsville, OH 44231. The cost is $18 per person. Please include the name and year of the alumni attending and the name(s) of any guests. The reservation deadline is September 1, 2014.

 

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Mantua – At the last school board meeting, the board announced their selection of several individuals to fill vacancies within the district. Lindsay Ludlow was hired to teach at the Primary School, while Monica Lazanich, Samantha Leonino, and Jamie Vick were hired to teach at the  Intermediate School. Jacob Page will be teaching at the High School, and Julie Sandish will serve as the District’s Speech Pathologist. In addition, the Board approved a three-year contract for David McMahon to fill the position as High School Principal. McMahon formerly served as Assistant Principal at the High School.

In other news, Band Camp is currently taking place, and will run through Thursday, July 31. Friday, August 1st marks the official start for fall sports practices. Furthermore, next Tuesday at 9 am, the 9th grade, JV and varsity volleyball teams will compete in a scrimmage at Aurora. The following day, the girls varsity golf team competes against Western Reserve at 9 am at the Diamond Back Golf Course while the boys varsity team competes in the Tiger Invitational Tournement at Sable Creek Golf Course at noon. At 5 and 7 pm, the  girls JV and varsity soccer teams compete at Ellet.

On Thursday, August 7th at 5:00PM the varsity and JV volleyball teams takes on Lake Center Christian School in a Scrimmage at Lake Center CS. At 3:45 pm on Friday, August 8th, the boys varsity golf will compete against Field at the Sunny Hills Golf Course.On Saturday, August 9th, the girls varsity and JV volleyball teams will take on Northwest at 10 am. Both matches are away. At 1 pm, the boys varsity and JV soccer teams will scrimmage against Stow at Stow. At 1 pm, the girls varsity soccer team will scrimmage at home, at the Bowen Road field against Waynedale and Springfield. The boys JV and varsity soccer teams will scrimmage against Stow, at Stow at 3 pm.

On Sunday, August 24th from 5-8pm, Crestwood Schools will hold a Community Day at Crestwood High School. Representatives from the district schools, as well as community organizations, will be hosting the Crestwood community for an evening of family fun, including bouncy houses, magic, balloon twisting and face painting. There will also be a pep rally starting at 7pm. In addition, the fire and police departments will give tours of a fire truck and police car, and local organizations will be on hand to share community information. Attendees are invited to bring school supplies and new or gently-used backpacks to “Stuff the Bus” for less fortunate families in the community. For more information, contact Kristina Bronder at kbronder@crestwoodschools.org.

Lastly, Crestwood School will host their Open House event on Monday, August 25th , , giving parents and students the opportunity to meet their 2014-2015 teachers and see their classrooms. Crestwood Primary and Intermediate Schools will be open from 5 – 7 pm, while the Middle and High Schools will be open from 6 – 8 pm. All Students’ start the new school year on Tuesday, August 26th.

 

Pictured above are (back row from the left): Jason Dlugokecki and Joe Smith;  (front row from the left): Denny Biddle, Misty Sommers and Rachel Adkins

Pictured above are (back row from the left): Jason Dlugokecki and Joe Smith; (front row from the left): Denny Biddle, Misty Sommers and Rachel Adkins

Garrettsville – The Roller Hutt speed team from Garrettsville, OH and Fast Forward speed team out of Hermitage, PA have just returned from the USARS Roller Speed Skating National Competition in Lincoln, Nebraska. Skaters raced on both inline skates (rollerblades) and quad skates (roller skates.) Racing takes place on a 100 meter indoor flat track, and the competition attracts skaters from all across the country.

Rachel Adkins raced in the Classic Ladies novice inline division races completing races of 500, 700, and 1000 meter races. She achieved 2nd place nationwide. Rachel was born and raised in Kent and currently resides in Mantua, OH.

Rachel also competed on quad skates and achieved 1st place nationwide, winning first in every distance within the Classic Ladies division. She also placed 1st in her 2-lady relay with Denise Larson and 1st in her 2-mix relay with Joe Smith.

Misty Sommers competed on quad skates in the Master Ladies division completing races of 300m, 500m. Competition was tough in this division, but Misty made it through her heats to all finals and came away with 3rd place nationwide. Misty is a Kent native and resident.

Misty also organizes the Park ‘N Roll skating festival held at the Munroe Falls Metro Park on South River Road coming up August 30th. See facebook.com/ParkNRollFestival for more information.

Jason Dlugokecki raced for the first time at Nationals this year, competing in the Master Men division with distances of 300, 500 and 1000 meters. Jason finished in the top three skaters within each of his heats and qualified for all of his final events. Jason is a Garrettsville native and has grown up in the Roller Hutt skating rink owned by his parents Linda and Craig.

Jason also skated a 2-mix relay with Misty Sommers and a 2-man relay with Denny Biddle of central Ohio. Jason and Denny received the bronze medal for their relay.

Denny Biddle also raced in the Esquire Men division, making it into all of his final races.

Joe Smith of Hermitage, PA won first place in the Master Men division, winning 1st in every distance as well as 1st in his 2-man and 2-mix relays.

To learn more about speed skating or to join the team, contact coach Jason Dlugokecki at info@jmd-entertainment.com. Team practices are held at Roller Hutt on Mondays from 6-8pm and cost $5 for adults and are free for under 18. Practices are on hold for the summer but will resume in November. Every age is welcome.

Copper

Hiram – Meet “Copper”, the newest addition to the Hiram Police Department. Copper is now Hiram Police Department’s mascot and will be at Hiram PD’s community events. We hold many community programs and thought the idea of having a mascot attend the events would be a wonderful addition.

Copper is the creation of Hiram PD Officer Steve Chapman and his fiancé Brooke Poloskey. Steve and Brooke are very committed to Hiram PD’s community programs, Brooke attends every event Hiram PD holds to support Hiram PD and the community. Brooke is “Copper”, she has a very high level of energy and she is very friendly, she is a great fit to be “Copper”. Copper can be seen at Hiram PD community events hugging kids, passing out kid friendly items, shaking hands, and posing for pictures. Copper will be in attendanceat Hiram Police Department’s 3rd Annual  “Cops and Kids Fishing Day” on August 23rd at Camp Asbury in Hiram 9:00am – 2:00pm.

Come spend the day with your Hiram Police Department Police Officers and Copper, and have fun fishing. The event is free, open to everyone, bait and lunch will be provided, there will be prizes and plenty of family fun!!

The Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club welcomed several guests at the July 21 meeting at Cal’s II—Erin Koon and Jessica McKnight from Huntington Bank, sitting in for Tanay Hill, Evelyn West, local delegate to RYLA (Rotary Youth Leadership Award) and  her mother, Sandy West.  The club also welcomed the return of Kim Kohli after an inactive period.

Items of business included dues invoices, discovery of  stored materials long thought to have disappeared, a reminder that   the by-laws should be reviewed, the upcoming “Rotary Night” with the Cleveland Indians on August 1—special ticket prices, activities for the whole family and fireworks(See a Rotarian to get in on the fun), annual Steak Fry on August 11 at 6:30, recently ordered, redesigned flags and pens for Exchange Student Rachel Schwan to take with her to Thailand, a Mrs. Santa suit may be available for the traditional Rotary Santa gift delivery (It’s never too early to be thinking about these things.  There’s no costume shop at the North Pole), Tom Collins has met with Steve Zabor of the Mantua-Shalersville Rotary Club, past District 6630 Governor, to discuss a possible co-operative project dealing with the Headwaters Bike and Hike Trail and application for a Rotary grant—more discussion planned—deadline approaching, possibility exists for incorporating Eagle Scout projects into the overall picture.  Jim Irwin brought in some historical documents, old Garrettsville Journals among them, for perusal and enlightenment.

Evelyn West described her experience at RYLA as a “fantastic experience.”  This included interacting with over forty other award-winners from all over District 6630 in both co-operative and competitive experiences, an “eye-opener “  of a mixer to start getting acquainted and plenty of fun.  Some of the activities were, basically, unstructured challenges to creativity and organizational skills, like the talent show which turned into a sort of wing-nut TV format.  Others hinged on a craziness car-wash enterprise called “Swooosh”. And “Fish” was about making work fun, entertainment as a motivating force , and “make your own” attitude to make your day…or anyone else’s day.  One of the speakers who made a very positive impression was Bob Dean, the Hiram College women’s soccer team coach.  Evelyn will, no doubt, be putting to use the many skills and insights she has acquired to make her senior year a great success.

Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary meets at noon on Mondays at Cal’s II in Sky Plaza.  You’re invited .

 

Nelson Twp. – Officials present at the July 16, 2014 trustee meeting were fiscal officer J. David Finney and township trustees Joe Leonard, Mike Elias, and Tom Matota. Also present were, Roads Supervisor Chuck Vanek, Zoning Inspector Anna Mae VanDerHoeven, and Community House Caretaker James Cmunt.

Elias made a motion to accept the minutes from the previous  meeting as presented; the motion was seconded by Matota, and all approved.

Finney presented the trustees with bills and wages to be paid totaling $14,557.73. A motion to pay the bills and wages was made by Elias and seconded by Leonard. The motion carried unanimously.

Vanek reported that the tractor is done; the dealer will be running it for approximately two hours on July 17th to ensure nothing breaks on it. Vanek also informed the trustees that the waterline on the old tractor, that is slated to be auctioned off, started leaking on July 14th. Repairs will be made in-house prior to the auction. It was also mentioned that the playground area at Pixley Park has been seeded and mulched.

Elias reported that Vanek had brought the booth for the county fair down, but there is some work that needs to be done on it. As of now, Elias does not feel that he would put it up. Elias plans to spruce it up, and update pictures and content.  Elias also relayed information he learned while attending the Solid Waste Management District meeting. A plan for the district has not been finalized, but it remains pretty similar to the old plan. In the new plan communities could participate in a consortium, allowing them to participate in curbside pickup for both trash and recyclables. In regards to the Nelson racetrack, Elias has spoken with the County Health Department; which has filed suit agains the racetrack, calling the tires and other debris refuse. As of last year, the owners of the racetrack were looking at a fine of $100/day per day they were in violation of regulations.

Leonard informed everyone that the Salt Barn is slated to be finished by the 28th; and on an unrelated note mentioned that he would like to come up with some simple rules for Pixley Park. Over the last few months Leonard has noticed that pet owners are not cleaning up droppings from their dogs‚ leaving feces scattered throughout the grassy areas near the ball field and playground. He would like to propose a no pet policy for the park.  More research will need to be done on establishing policies for the park, and he will be working with Finney to find some examples that could be built upon.

Finney provided the trustees with suggested supplemental appropriations to the Township budget that will free up $85,000 for use on the chip & seal project. By dropping part 5 from the project, only $84,576.20 would be needed for chip & seal work on Township roads. Matota made a motion to change the appropriations as listed, Elias seconded. The trustees also voted to award  Hughes Contracting the contract for parts 1 through 4.

Nelson Trustees meet on the first and third Wednesdays of the month at 7 p.m. in the Community House.  Meetings are open to the public and residents are encouraged to attend.

 

gmen-garfield-localGarrettsville – One more meeting of the Campus of Excellence Oversight Committee on August 21 (D-Day plus one), the day AFTER the Garfield Elementary School Addition and Campus Enhancement project is scheduled for completion.

The roof is on.  The windows are nearly all in.  The door frames are ready for installation.  Despite the vicissitudes encountered in any construction project with this kind of timeline and this kind of retrofitting involved, the light is on at the end of the tunnel. It’s coming down to the wire and all systems are GO!

Savings were realized in the bidding process and have been re-invested in upgrades throughout the James A. Garfield campus, for all buildings.  This includes more efficient windows, security upgrades (also utilizing funds raised initially by Dee Synnestvedt for parking lot security cameras), digital signage for the high school and elementary school campus—5’x8’, wireless, , kitchen  improvements, carpeting in the new elementary band room, furniture upgrades…the whole shootin’ match…looking good.

So when would you like to hold the official ribbon-cutting ceremony?  In September some time?  Before a home football game?  On my birthday?  Whatever your suggestion, get it to a committee member or to the district office ASAP and, in any case, plan to mark your calendar and be there because heaven only knows how many dignitaries will arrive to see this amazing accomplishment marked by the community and all of the folks who made it possible.

And don’t forget that your YMCA is also reaching out to the community for input concerning the types of programs you would like to see offered out of the Park Avenue building.  They will soon begin having one-day-a-week open hours for registration leading to participation in fall programs.  Ditto for the PCESC which will be operating a pre-school program out of that building.  The YMCA contact person is Chris Scheuer; his number is 914-443-0043 and he’d like to hear about your interest in programs for all ages, K through Old-Enough-to-Know-Better.  Let him know what you’re interested in.

We’re ALL interested in this.

One to go!

mantua-tractor-pull-oxroastMantua – The gray skies didn’t deter folks from going to St. Joseph’s Ox Roast in Mantua this past weekend. Folks ventured out Friday night to watch the karaoke-style Ox Idol Contest and antique tractor pulls. Others took a stroll along the midway and enjoyed many fair treats, including ox roast sandwiches, ox dinners and ox sundaes. Ox sundaes consisted of mashed potatoes covered in roast ox and gravy, topped with sour cream and a cherry tomato.  It was delish!   The day was topped  off with fireworks, making it an evening to remember.

Saturday morning was rainy and dreary. The rain caused the cancellation of the ever-popular garden tractor pulls, which disappointed many fair-goers.  All day long folks were tent hopping trying to keep dry. Many day-time fair-goers enjoyed watching the bands and the dancers from the 8th Count Dance Center.

The highlight of Saturday was the semi/tractor pulls.  The rain did not prevent the featured event of the night from happening. Late day, the crowds began forming, looking to secure a prime seat for the semi/tractor pulls. Before too long, the stands were full and the pulls were ready to begin.

Those not into the pulls  could watch Ox Idol or listen to live music on the main stage. Now, it would not be a festival without politicians, food vendors, and, of course, rides, There were plenty to choose from, giving fair-goers their festival fix. There also was a casino, instant bingo and a beer garden to keep folks occupied.

There was plenty for the kids to do as well. They had the usual rides, plus they had activities in Oxland for the kids. On Saturday they held kiddie tractor pulls, which attracted many youngsters. Saturday and Sunday afternoon they had balloon artist, Jason Adkins on hand to entertain the kids with his many balloon characters.

The events slated for Sunday were a frog jumping contest, the four wheel drive pulls, live music by Tyrone’s Blues Sensation (T.B.S.) and the main raffle drawing. The main raffle was $5000 for first place and a $500 Kalahari resort gift card for second place.

The Ox Roast was started 51 years ago and was originally created to be a fundraiser for the parish school. Since the closing of the school, the parish uses the proceeds from the event to supports its many ministries.

The success of the event lies in the cooking of the meat. They trim, season and cook 3,500 pounds of sirloin for the event in brick-lined pits. It takes days to reach the proper temperature so the sirloins roast to perfection. Once the meat is roasted and cooled, they slice it and get it ready to serve in their dinners, sandwiches and sundaes.

 

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Mantua – At the July meeting of the Crestwood School Board, the Board approved a contract with Virtual Community School (VCS), an online school based in Ohio. Through enrollment in the special program, families who choose online schooling for their students would be supplied with a computer, printer and online instruction aligned with State and common core standards through VCS. VCS would monitor and report students progress back to Crestwood, ensuring that the students meet the appropriate academic requirements.

The agreement is valid for the 2014-2015 academic school year, and will offer online and homeschool students within the Crestwood School District to continue with online instruction while becoming a Crestwood District student. As such, the student would be eligible to participate in the District’s extracurricular activities, and the District would retain some of the per-student instruction funds from State and Federal sources. According to Superintendent David Toth, the ultimate goal, at some point in the future, would be to provide such a program using Crestwood teachers as instructors, an initiative that is part of the current strategic plan.

In other news, the Board approved contracts for the 2014 – 2015 school year with Advanced Rehabilitation, Portage Physical Therapists, and the Stark/Portage Area Computer Consortium (SPARCC) for Internet services. In addition, the Board authorized the Superintendent to implement a Continuous Improvement Plan, based on a summary of findings from this Spring’s Strategic Planning Sessions for the District.

Later, Superintendent Toth and the School Board congratulated Mr. Arden Sommers on his resignation/return to retirement, thanking him for his years of service to the District. Mr. Sommers acknowledged, “It’s been a privilege.” Filling Mr. Sommers position as Principal of Crestwood High School will be Dave McMahon, former Assistant Principal at the High School.

Lastly, the Board set a date for a public hearing on Monday, August 4th at 6:45 pm, to rehire a number of Crestwood retirees. This meeting will be held in the High School Library. The regularly scheduled Board meeting will start immediately following, at 7 pm.

 

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Looking to embrace the beauty of the outdoors? Portage Parks offers a variety of educational activities, outdoor adventures, and numerous other events throughout each season. Listed below are several upcoming hikes and programs designed for you to get outdoors and explore.

 

Guided Nature Hikes and Educational Programs

Aug. 3 – Afternoon Stroll 2 pm -3 pm

In conjunction with the Lions Club Sweet Corn Festival at Beckwith Orchards, join the Portage Park Staff on a leisurely stroll down the Hike and Bike Trail beginning at Lake Rockwell Rd. and sauntering to Breakneck Creek. See what wildflowers might be in bloom; listen to what birds might be singing in the area, discuss the importance of Breakneck watershed and talk about how the area looked 100 years ago. Distance 2 miles

 

Aug. 10 – Night Hike Dix Park  8 pm -10 pm

Come join the Portage park staff on a journey through Dix Park using only your ears! Is that a Grey Tree Frog? What is the difference between a Katydid and a cricket sound? We will see if there are any owls in the neighborhood. We will also discuss bats and their importance in the ecosystem. If we are lucky we might see an opossum or raccoon! Distance 2 miles

 

Aug. 19 – What’s in and around Seneca Ponds 1 pm – 3 pm

Come join the Portage Park staff in walking around Seneca ponds. Learn the difference between Dragonflies and Damselflies and why they are important. What is the difference between a snapping, painted, and box turtle? What frogs might live in the pond? What snakes might be in the area? Who knows maybe we will be able to see, hold, and get an up close look at some of the inhabitants of the pond. Distance 1 mile

 

Wild Challenge Hike Schedule

Aug. 10 Dix Park Night Hike -8:00 pm

Aug. 17 Seneca Ponds 2:00pm

Aug. 24 Berlin Lake Trail – 2:00 pm

Sept. 14 Morgan Preserve 2:00 pm

Sept. 24 Chagrin Headwaters Preserve 2:00 pm

Oct. 5- Headwaters Trail Rt 700- 2:00 pm

Oct. 26 Headwaters Trail Buchert park 2:00 pm

Nov. 9- Franklin Bog Preserve 2:00 pm

 

Stay tuned for more upcoming hikes and programs

 

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W.A.R.A. met on Tuesday July 15th at the United Methodist Church on North Park Avenue, at 7:30 pm. Two new ham operators were introduced and taken into the club. KD8YYP Jason Rister, and Rose Carver as an Associate member.

The Annual Ham Fest will be held Sunday,  August 17th at the Trumbull County Fairgrounds, 899 Everett Hull Rd. Cortland, Ohio 44410. Gate A for vendors, Gate B for public. It will run from 8 am until 2pm. Vendors are welcome, please contact Jacqueline Williams N8JMW at 440.636.2806, if you want to rent a table.  Frequency check-ins will be on 146.970 with a pl tone of 100.0.

VE Testing will begin at 10am, with a testing prize. The Hamfest is dedicated to all of our silent keys from the past few years.

Be sure to check in for a chance at our mobile check in prize!

Information can be had by website: www.w8vtd.org.

Our Garfield Junior High soccer team will be co-ed and be comprised of grades 6 thru 8; open to all communities.  We will be playing other Jr. High teams in Geauga County and the surrounding area so travel is mandatory, skill level is higher than recreation and games will most likely be played on the weekends.  Although we are not considered part of the school district, we will be playing other district school teams and recreation programs.  Expect the fee to play to be about $50.00 per player and team sponsors are welcome.  This is the first step in Garfield establishing a Jr. High soccer program.  Our first practice will be August 7 at Brosius Rd. Field from 6 to 8 PM.  Please contact Bob Finney for more information and any ideas you may have to help grow our program at matrixprints@yahoo.com , txt or FB me.

great-lakes-medieval-faireGeneva – Rain or shine, step back in tyme and the enchanted shire shall be thine!

Would you like to roam through a mystical woodland inhabited by fantastical faeries, intriguing imps and beautiful butterflies? Spend a day winding your way through a medieval maze of merriment around every turn? Come to the grand gates of Avaloch and allow the lands beyond to captivate you as gallant knights and lovely maidens await you.

For us 21st century folk, the door to the magical 13th century is located just off Rt. 534 in Geneva in the form of the Great Lakes Medieval Faire and, though it’s not quite like walking through that famous wardrobe or a certain blue telephone booth, it will instantly transport visitors to another place and another time quite effectively! Each weekend (Saturday and Sunday) from now until August 17th, you are cordially invited to promenade with the Royal Court, wander through the wooded forests and exchange pleasantries with paupers and princes alike. For an extra layer of excitement, each weekend venture presents its own unique theme, encouraging guests to envelop themselves in a different persona with every experience. During opening weekend of July 12th-13th, capes and super powers were a-plenty in honor of any Super Heroes, Super Villains, & Super Pets (even those in disguise!). There was a plethora of goggle-donning “doctors” in the house for July 19th-20th which was the Tyme Travel, Alter Ego, Steam Punk, Comic-Con Blast. Next weekend, July 26th-27th, needs only one word: pirates!! Trade your goggles in for an eye patch and stay out of the way (or join in the ruckus!) as the plundering invade Avaloch. Plaid is the word for August 2nd–3rd’s Celtic Celebration or if you prefer the elegance of a toga you’ll have your chance to party at August 9th–10th’s Togas, Tiaras, Masquerade & Dreams weekend. Wrapping up the season, the battling brutes have a chance to shine as August 16 th-17th is the Barbarian, Viking, & Mongul Conquest.

To procure entry into the festivities, tickets for adults are $22 at the gate, children are $6 (or buy online and save a few dollars). Desiring a longer visit to the kingdom than just a few marks on a sundial? A season pass is available at $50, valid for the remaining eight Faire days, or come simply for one consecutive Saturday and Sunday with a weekend pass which is just a few dollars more than your original gate ticket. No matter how you arrive or on what day you choose to knock at the gates of Avaloch, plan to stand ready at 10:45am to be officially welcomed during a ceremony featuring the royal family.

Aside from the abundance of entertainment to be discovered throughout the afternoon, Avaloch is famous for the exquisite marketplace featuring crafters of all talents. Those who love all things shiny will be continually delighted at the array of offerings presented in the way of bits and baubles to carry home a small piece of the shire. Even though it rained last weekend (or maybe it was the Wenches at it again) and making one’s way through the “path of least yuck” was a challenge, it was quite worth it as it caused one to slow down and appreciate the surroundings (and the covered booths available) while encountering gorgeous glassmaking demonstrations or humorously being caught off guard by a mini catapult pummeling passersby with marshmallows. (Note: to see a real catapult, and a pair of archers with real talent, the Field of Honor is the place to be.) Mine for your own gems or choose from an assortment of pre-arranged pretties. A visitor with a keen eye should keep a lookout for a certain character of the day sponsored by the Tanner Customs jewelry stand. Be one of the first to spot her and earn a very special shiny for yourself! (For a clue before you go, find them on the modern contraption that is facebook, in advance, under the secret name of “Medieval Millinery & Embellishments.” Shhh, don’t tell anyone I said so lest I be chased by dragons for giving away kingdom intel!)

 

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Summer Stock 37 is proud to present our upcoming performances of Hairspray: The Musical.  With music by Marc Shaiman, lyrics by Scott Wittman and Shaiman and a book by Mark O’Donnell and Thomas Meehan, Hairspray is based on the 1988 John Waters film. Directors Tom Hitmar, Mackenzie Pinto and choreographer Dana Warren-Tolios lead the cast.  Songs include 1960s-style dance music and “downtown” rhythm and blues. In 1962 Baltimore, plump teenager Tracy Turnblad attempts to realize her dream of dancing on The Corny Collins Show, a local TV dance program similar to American Band Stand, and to join the movement for civil rights.

 

Hairspray performs July 18–20, and 25-27, and August 1-3, at Kent Trumbull Theatre, 4314 Mahoning Ave. N.W. in Warren, OH.  All shows are at 8:00 PM except for Sundays at 3:00 PM. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors and students, and $10 for children. Call (330) 675-8887 or email trumbullboxoffice@kent.edu for information and reservations.

Garrettsville – Council met July 9, 2014 for their regularly scheduled village council meeting.  A public hearing was held prior to the start of regular business for proposed Ordinance 2014-25, the Village of Garrettsville proposed tax budget for 2015.  No residents were present and no comments were made.

Minutes from last month’s meeting were approved and council reviewed revenue, expenditure, cash balance and income tax reports.  Comments were made about expenditures exceeding revenue on the monthly report and Councilman Hadzinsky commented that historically June is a low revenue month.  Village clerk Nancy Baldwin reminded council that the biggest reason expenditure has been high the past few months is because of the curbing and sidewalk projects that have been completed.  (Baldwin went on to say after the council meeting that most projects for the village are completed in the summer months, which consequently mean higher expenditures.  However that doesn’t mean the village is operating in the red, quite the contrary.  According to Baldwin, the village finances are solid.)

Council went on to approve Ordinance 2014-25 setting the 2015 village tax budget, Ordinance 2014-27 that renews a 20 year lease with East Ohio Gas Company for a box near the police station, and Ordinance 2014-28 which has to do with employee compensation changes and to make them coincide with existing pay periods.

During round table discussion, Council President, Tom Hardesty, updated everyone on the status of the puddling issues with the completion of the Windham street paving project.  The state will make sure the problems are corrected.  Hardesty also stated that the village’s next improvement project is to construct curbing on the east side of South Street from the top of the hill to the library entrance.  He is waiting on estimates, but the cost should not exceed the budgeted amount.  Council passed a motion to proceed with the project.

Councilwoman Anderson proposed  that council consider an annual ‘contest’ for property owners in the village for ‘most/best improved property’ as well as ‘best landscaping’.  Her suggestion included possibly asking the garden club to assist with choosing criteria and winners.  Council unanimously thought it a good idea and asked Anderson to pursue the idea.

Next the mayor informed council he had a schedule conflict for the scheduled August council meeting as asked them to consider changing the date and time.  After some discussion, it was determined that it would be difficult to get all council members to attend for the alternate meeting dates proposed and no decision was made on rescheduling.

Councilwoman Harrington brought up the survey that the Village Services Visionary Group has put together.  The plan is to have the surveys available at the post office, library and village clerk’s office sometime toward the end of July.

At the close of roundtable discussion, the mayor asked for input or comments from the audience.  Village tax clerk Valerie McCullough brought up the subject of delinquent taxpayers in the village and her frustration in getting them to pay their taxes.  She asked for suggestions in how to better deal with some of the problems she encounters.  McCullough stated that there are currently 101 people on delinquent tax repayment plans accounting for approximately $156,000 in uncollected revenue over the past five tax years.  Once the repayment plan has been agreed to, all penalties and interest are stopped and repayment is based on the principal owed.  Penalties and interest are currently not reinstated for those that have defaulted on a repayment plan.  McCullough says she plans to investigate the legality of reinstating the monetary penalties for those that default on repayment as well as the functionality of the income tax software the village uses in addressing these issues.

McCullough’s biggest frustration is with those who agree to a repayment plan (with or without court action) and then quit paying only a few payments in.   Solicitor Michelle Stuck stated she would be glad to write letters reminding the offenders of their obligation and that she would pursue legal action through the criminal court system.  Stuck also said that for those defaulting on repayment plans who have already been to court, she would take them back to court and seek a conviction.    McCullough also said that there are another 55 residents who have not filed for 2013 owing approximately $56,000.

At the end of the discussion, Council adjourned to executive session to discuss personnel issues.

If you’d like to know more of what is happening in your community attend a meeting.  The next regular Village Council meeting is currently scheduled for August 13, 2014 at 7:30 p.m. at Village Hall.

 

Garrettsville – Anyone with some spare time and a sense of humor should make a beeline for the Iva Walker Theatre this weekend for the final performances of “Little Shop of Horrors” by the thespians of the Garrettsville Curtains Up Theatre company.

The plot revolves around an alien plant that just happens to wind up in a Skid Row florist shop (Likely, eh?) being tended by a nebbish named Seymour who’s smitten with the shop’s other employee, Audrey, who’s constantly being abused by her sadistic dentist boyfriend (Are you following this?).  Turns out the plant is a ‘way more advanced version of the Venus Flytrap and doesn’t dig plant food, just blood (Any type, dentist, shop owner,  girl friend, whatever). Customers are impressed by the exotic greenery. Chiffon, Crystal and Ronnette are the doo-woppy Greek chorus   that helps the story line along and wind up being about the only ones on the stage that don’t become a main course for the hungry plant.

Good cast, fun music—especially if you’re old enough to catch the pop culture references—a very menacing plant voice and a pleasant way to spend an evening.

 

The Geauga County Retired Teachers’ Association will hold their annual picnic on Tuesday August 5th at Swine Creek Park in Middlefield at the Lake Side Shelter. Swine Creek Park is located at 15900 Hayes Rd. which turns off of Rte 87 east of Middlefield. (Please refer to a map which is posted on our website: gerta.net.) Attendees may gather at 11:15 with a business meeting beginning at 11:30 followed by picnic lunch at noon.

Each participant is asked to bring their own table service and a dish to pass. Pulled pork sandwiches will be supplied by Nancy Speck, and drinks will also be provided. After the meal, the Grant in Aid recipients will be introduced and presented with their awards.

Please RSVP to Nancy Speck at 440-286-3864. Guests are encouraged to bring a newly retired teacher, school personnel, or another guest who may need a ride. The association will be accepting donations of flour or kidney beans for The Geauga County Hunger Task Force, as well as SCHOOL SUPPLIES FOR GEAUGA STUDENTS.

If transportation is needed to the picnic, please contact Geauga Transit at 440-285-2222 or 440-564-7131 ext. 5160 a week before the scheduled event to make your reservation.

 

Garrettsville - The Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club meeting on July 14, 2014 at Cal’s II began with the “Passing of the Pig”  to celebrate significant events of the preceding week; these included : a son’s attainment of The Order of the Arrow in Boy Scouts, marvelous mileage in a new car, the good life and a guest in attendance, a mortgage fulfilled, a baby brother’s birthday, a return from a successful family vacation, progress on the new school construction, the passing and appreciation of a beloved mother-in-law, a graduation/family reunion.  The “Days of Our Lives”.

Guest Steve Jenkins, with the Funeral Directors’ Life Insurance Company spoke briefly about    the topic he knows a lot about, pre-need planning for end-of-life situations.  With the actuarial disruptions caused by lengthening life spans, too many people are likely to misjudge their needs in terms of long-term care and funeral expenses.  The MedicAid  spend-down required is not well understood and unforeseen consequences can throw a monkey wrench into even  seemingly well-planned situations.  The issue of closure for the bereaved often takes a backseat to money when planning is done but it does not necessarily go away.  The FDLIC encourages pre-planning to mitigate the disruptions which can come about through lack of understanding between   family members.

Steve Zabor, of the Mantua-Shalersville Rotary Club, representing the District6630 grants committee, issued an invitation to a meeting—August 6 at Jake’s– being organized by Edie Benner for consideration of a possible joint project among the G-H and M-S and Aurora clubs focusing on the Headwaters Trail, its community and economic  potential.  He also brought a heads-up about “Rotary Days”, a point of interest for Rotary International and President Gary Huang, inviting communities across the globe to participate in activities, especially outdoor activities, with Rotarians to foster appreciation of the great outdoors, physical pursuits and   good neighbors.

Rachel Schwan is anticipating a 6-hour flight to Thailand, beginning on August 6 (Guess she’ll miss the meeting).  She can brush up on her language skills, learning Thai.

The Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club will be sponsoring a hole at the G-Men Football Golf Outing coming soon AND contributing to a fabulous New York learning experience for the Candance Academy, involving master classes, a lesson with the Rockettes and the new version of “Cinderella” on Broadway.  Supporting the community is what it’s all about.  Light Up Rotary!

 

Windham - The WVFD Joint Fire District Board met for their regularly scheduled meeting on July 11, 2014 with members Dann Timmons, Debbie Blewitt and Ron Kilgore, along with Fiscal Officer Jayme Neikirk in attendance. Two members were unavailable for the meeting.

The board approved the minutes, June bank reconciliation and expenditures before moving on to approve 2015 budget.  The board also approved the county certificate for placing a renewal 4 mill levy on the ballot in November.

In the chief’s report, Mike Iwanyckyj reported that they were awarded a grant for nearly $53,000, which has to be used for training.  Timmons suggested they develop another plan for purchasing new trucks, as it appears that grant money for large equipment seems to be drying up. The board will discuss this over the next few months and develop a plan of action for large equipment purchases. Chief Iwanyckyj said he will apply for the large equipment grant again in the fall. He said his sources say that they have a good chance to receive one. Iwanyckyj also reported that that truck 2815 had the shifter cable replaced and some electrical work done, truck 2818 had bad valve replaced and brakes done and the rescue unit had a windshield replaced due to  stone damage. He also reported that truck 2817 will need tires before winter.  The department is in need of new fire hoses and the chief will get estimates for that.

The board approved the chief’s recommendation of Jacob Bowden, and Tracey Rowe as EMT /fire fighter and Chad Mosier as firefighter.  Welcome to the WVFD!

Lastly, Iwanyckyj reported that they had eight calls on  July 11, 2014 and, as of July 11th, 398 calls year-to-date.

Residents asked about dispatching costs and it is estimated that with the current call volume they are on pace exceed last years call volume at an expense of about $25,000 for 2014.

The next fire board meeting is scheduled for August 14, 2014 at 7pm.