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Garrettsville-Hiram Rotarians and their guests–District Governor Steve Zabor, past District Governor Jay Dzurilla, Daniel Cartwright, Caitlyn Lawless and Tom & Sherri Collins– recently were treated to a program presented by  Carol Dombrose, founder and operator of Angel House, a facility offering retreats and other programs for inner city young people, and member of the Strongsville Rotary Club.

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Nelson Twp. – Literary Musical Club (LMC) held their monthly meeting on July 11. We had eleven member present, sorry to report a couple of members are seriously ill. Our prayers for a speedy recovery are sento to them.

On July 16th, the Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary club was treated to a travelogue and a performance by Tyler Brady, a member of the Cleveland Youth Wind Symphony, just returned from a tour of Hungary and Poland.   He described the logistics of the tour and many of the experiences shared by the ninety-some students on the trip, which had enjoyable scenery and side trips as well as  performances to appreciative audiences at several venues.  Of particular interest were the visits to Auschwitz, to Krakow, to the relics of Pope John Paul II, to the bath houses of Budapest, to the salt mines.  He had mementos of all sorts and a video of singing Ukrainians; he had memories of a lifetime.

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The James A. Garfield Historical Society, meeting in the historic Mott Building, Main Street, Garrettsville on July 16, 2012, began their proceedings by accepting several donations to their collection of documents and artifacts.

From former resident, Virginia Quale, an Underwood portable typewriter (Remember those?),  a Garrettsville H.S. graduation cap with  classmates’ signatures, postcards and a mystery object which will require investigation.  From Tony Scarl came a milk bottle and a jar of spices from the now-defunct Doc’s Restaurant on Main St.  Julie Fredrickson contributed a book of court records from the late 1800’s.  Jhon Kline’s donation was a 1949 Ford automobile advertisement from the Hecky-Pollock dealership in Garrettsville. A painting by local artist Celia Thomas was donated by Dennis Eberhart.

Garrettsville-Hiram Rotarians continued their planning for the coming year by reviewing program prospects, including a visit from the GSETeam–a feature of a Rotary exchange program for young adults in business careers, Tyler Brady of the Cleveland Youth Woodwind Symphony–lately returned from a European tour, a send-off(July 30) for Jessica Lyons who will be leaving for Norway as part of a Rotary exchange program for high school students, Jim Frame and his connection to the Gift of Life program, reports from the local RYLA (Rotary Youth Leadership Assembly) attendees –with an invitation to current Interact members, the annual steak-fry to be held at the home of Ed Perdian of August 27.

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Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club is looking for a few good members.  If you like interacting with other like-minded, convivial, connected community members…if you are interested in making your local community and your world a better, more caring and interconnected place…if you’d like to be involved in projects and programs supporting education, health care issues worldwide as well as national, cultural exchanges of many kinds at many levels…check out the Rotarians, meeting Monday evenings in the Kennedy Center at Hiram College–dinner at 5:30, meeting at 6:00.  They’ll be looking for you.

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The June meeting of the Heart of Doll Country was held at the home of Carolyn Englert.  We have had no response to our query about the girls who participated in a 1999 Doll Tea Party jointly sponsored by Waterfall Antiques and Lee Middleton Dolls.  If you were one of those girls, please contact either Jean Lawrence, 330-546-5810 or Carolyn Englert, 330-527-4888.  We’d love to have a reunion!

Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary, at the meeting on May 5, interviewed candidates  to attend this year’s RYLA gathering at Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio, June 10-14.  They are proud to announce the selection of  Brittany Sisson and Andrea Sheller of Garfield High School and  Jake Sweet of Windham High School as their representatives to the program. Also present at the meeting was Darren Karlove who attended in 2010 and gave a thumbnail sketch of the activities involved and the positive outcomes they had in his life.  He was appreciative of the great mix of  talents, styles, backgrounds and leadership qualities that were present in the program and the participants.  He felt that it was a life-changing experience.  

LAF SOMe has a new partner!  That’s right, Life After 50, Seniors On the Move is partnering with the new Nelson Garrettsville Senior Social Club (NGSSC).  The NGSSC will offer weekly meetings for area seniors and LAF SOMe will continue to offer day trips and special event gatherings.  The two groups combined efforts will offer area seniors numerous opportunities to socialize and have fun.

Garrettsville – Pack up your favorite unique or antique mail and your forks, the James A. Garfield Historical Society’s May meeting will focus on postcards and pie, a show-and-tell with a twist.  If you’ve got a postcard with a pie on it–cherry stains don’t count–bring it on down to the Mott Building on Main St. on Monday, May 21 at 7:30 for the event.  If your postcard has something to do with local history, you’re in the running too.  If it’s just old, old and interesting, there’s a spot for you as well.  The more, the merrier!

Windham – The spooky world of the paranormal is coming to the Windham Historical Society. At their monthly meeting on Monday, April 16, at 7 PM at the Brick Chapel, 9001 North Main Street, all interested listeners will hear how Windham once stood at the center of the world of psychic research.

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Members of 20th Century Club met March 15th at the James A. Garfield Historical Society building on Main Street in Garrettsville for the last business meeting of the year.  Co-hostesses for the evening were Nasreen Kitko and Gay McCoy.  Roll call was an interesting Civil War fact.  The program was delivered by Jan Boehm on GONE WITH THE WIND. Following the program, members were treated to an assortment of St. Patrick Day treats and encouraged to walk around the historical building.  Members will next meet at their annual Spring Party on April 19th at the Garfield Building in Hiram OH at the intersection of Rt. 305 and Rt. 82.  The Spring Party committee comprised of Jan Boehm (Chair), Jeannette Marvin Hall, Nasreen Kitko, and Cherri Wolfe, will plan the dinner and ordination of officers.

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The March 6th meeting of The Heart of Doll Country was held at the United Methodist Church in Garrettsville.  Present were Pat Dutchman, Kerin Denna, Carolyn Englert, and Jean Lawrence.  After the Minutes of the previous meeting were read, and the Treasurer’s report given, a discussion on the issue of continuing to meet at the church was held.  Due to a decline in membership, it was decided to move our meetings to member’s homes.  The next topic was our annual Luncheon, to be held in July this year, with a theme of A Doll’s Christmas in July.  A speaker, Sandy Pelphrey has been arranged, and we talked about table decorations, competitions, and ticket sales.  A guest was introduced, Helen Danku, who had a hand made Raggedy Ann doll that was made for her children years ago.  She wanted advice on how to clean and care for the doll.  The members responded with some good conservation techniques.  Pat served light refreshments, and Helen won the door prize, a lovely plant.  The next meeting will be April 3rd, at the home of Carolyn Englert.  If you are interested in visiting or joining the club, feel free to contact Carolyn at pindolllady@gmail.com or 330-527-4888.

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The Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club was treated to a “Family Act” on Monday, March 9 in the ballroom of the Hiram College Kennedy Center as Vera and Christophe Waroquet, with their children, Ronan, Etienne and Sophia presented a delightful musical evening featuring piano, guitar and vocal numbers by the various family members, individually and together. There were stories of travel and of the role of Rotary in bringing them all together and to the United States. There were stories of bringing the “blended” family into one household–Hungary, France, Morocco were part of the mix, as were Brigham Young University and Carnegie-Mellon University, concert tours and an interest in American History–a sort of “Brady Bunch” with an international flavor. Also part of the tale was the Aurora School of Music, founded nearly five years ago and still expanding in many directions, using digital technology and an enthusiastic and accomplished staff. The master classes, the video streaming of recitals, the recordings, the summer camps all make this a success story in the arts. The family then showcased their individual talents: Ronan played a Bartok piece, Etienne sang “Do You Hear the People Singing?” from “Le Mis”, Sophia shyly did a song of her own, Christophe did an Italian number and “River” by Garth Brooks and Vera gave her interpretation of the G minor Rhapsody by Brahms, managing to give what is often termed “heavy” a thoughtful and energetic presentation…to the great enjoyment of all in attendance. It was a captivating evening.

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Members of 20th Century Club met March 1st at the home of Connie Crate. Co-hostess for the evening was Gay McCoy.  Members answered roll call with their favorite English custom.  The program was given by Jeannette Marvin Hall on SENSE AND SENSIBILITY.  Following the program members enjoyed a baked potato bar with all the fixings.   The next meeting will be held on March 15th at the James A. Garfield Historical Society.  Co-hostesses will be Nasreen Kitko and Gay McCoy.  The program will be given by Jan Boehm.

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Nelson Twp. – The Literary Music Club had their meeting at Nelson Community center on March 14th. As a result of nice spring weather we had 6 members in attendance. Kathy Spolarch was our hostess; she had the tables set in a St. Patrick’s theme. We had three birthdays for March, Ann Spolarch, Kathy Spolarch and Sally Kittle. Iva Walker entertained us with her “Chocolate Confection” and it was very interesting to hear about where chocolate comes from. We always enjoy her speeches. Next month we will go to Hawaii, Margaret Lappert is in Hawaii for her vacation and will have lots to tell. Our next meeting is April 11. See you there!

Garrettsville – The Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Family Week ended as it began, with fun for all in attendance.  The kids of all ages got to engage in games and contests and craft projects–with or without face-painting.  Awards for participation in all of the various competitions –art & essays, etc.–were handed out.  The craft table was popular, with kids making cards for moms & dads and just about anybody else they thought fondly of.  The importance of family was shining through the whole day.
Couples married fifty years and more, eight of them, were recognized.  Donald & June  Crawford took the longevity sweepstakes, having been married a fun-filled fifty-eight years…and counting.  The Family of the Year–the Douglas and Karen Lyons family, with Porter, the Transplant Guy, in attendance– received their award as well.

The inflatable slide/rock climb was a big hit with the intrepid of all sizes and descriptions.  Plenty of dads and grandpas are still feeling the effects of assisting on “the slopes”.  What can we say?  The day was a success!

Still more activities are on the horizon for G-H Rotary : The Four-Way Speech Contest is rapidly approaching; any teens wishing to participate should start honing their skills and plan to contact a Rotarian to get on the roster.   There is a prize and a chance to compete on a district level–good experience.

Windham – The Windham Historical Society continues its busy 2012 schedule on Monday, March 19, at 7 PM in the Brick Chapel on North Main Street in Windham.

The program for this meeting will be presentations by two Windham High School seniors, Caitlyn Isler and Julia Brookover, as the final step in their pursuit of Windham Historical Society scholarships.

These scholarships are underwritten by the Stuart Higley Foundation, administered by descendants of one of Windham’s founding families. The Higley Foundation has been a long time benefactor of the Historical Society.

Julia will be talking about the effects of the coming of the Ravenna Arsenal on her extended family, which was uprooted in 1939 when the federal government took the family farm. She has done extensive research and interviews to prepare a personal look at the sociological effects of that important time in Windham history.

Caitlyn will freeze a moment in time when she talks about “When Richard Nixon Came To Windham.” Very few people who settled here after 1972 know about the excitement of that day, one week before his re-election, and Caitlyn has compiled an entertaining look back in time – right down to how it threw the Taft cows off their milking schedule.

Both of the students are leaders at Windham High School. Caitlyn is an All-Conference athlete, playing volleyball, softball and basketball, and serving on Student Council and National Honor Society. She is heading to Ohio State University to major in exercise science.

Julia, who is  class valedictorian, has engaged in the Drama Club, choir, National Honor Society, and volunteers in numerous activities. She has been accepted into the Honors College of Toledo University, pursuing a degree in psychology.
The public is invited to this free presentation by two of Windham finest scholars.

The Society is always interested in obtaining, whether permanently or on loan, any object with relevance to Windham. Items of special interest include pictures, scrapbooks, ephemera, newspapers, advertising, tokens, school items, sports items, or family genealogy.
For more information on the Society, please call President Lynnea St. John at 330-326-6061, or email her at lynnya45@yahoo.com.

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The Trumbull County 4-H program has a youth club focused on teaching kids how to build robots and they are looking for new youth to join the club.
The 4-H robotics project is designed to engage youth in using science, technology, engineering, and math skills to build Lego robots.  Youth will work in small groups to build and program their own robot.  Kids will learn what a robot is, how to build one, and how to program it to interact with its environment.  The 4-H Robotics group earned three new Lego robot kids through a grant from the Ohio 4-H Foundation.

Pictured above are (front row) Olivia Valot, Angela Agati, Natalie Albert , Melody Jacques, Genevieve Bailey and Rebecca DeSanto. Back row Katrelyn Jacques, Christina Gargas, Emalea Moore, Alyssa Hartley, Alyson Sites, Jersee Hogue and Deanie Simpson

Newton Falls – Our local Girl Scout Troop 239 is helping the American Red Cross by donating seven quilts, after reading an article requesting needed items.

The troop began their “service project” in September. They set up a quilting frame in their meeting room at First Church of God and sewed at each meeting; cutting material, knotting and stitching and finishing the last quilt in November.

Pat Leach, leader of the Troop, said there are six Scouts doing the project for their Bronze Award which is the highest award a Junior Girl Scout can earn. The blankets were presented to representatives Christina Gargas, and Deanie Simpson from American Red Cross at a recent meeting. At the meeting, Gargas discussed the services provided and explained the blood drives that are held locally. This information was helpful to the girls receiving  their First Aid Badge. Working as a team, the Scouts shared a new experience while gaining knowledge and confidence while making a difference in their community.

It’s Girl Scout cookie time – call 330-872-7937 to place your order.  The profit from sales help fund new experiences like this. Thank you!

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Members of the Twentieth Century Club of Garrettsville and their guests met on February 16 in the Fellowship Hall of St. Ambrose Church in Garrettsville to become acquainted with the artistic and spiritual journeys of sculptor and woodcarver Rich Cermak.  

Garrettsville-Hiram Rotarians are The Rotarian Train, highballing it to the Family Fun Week coming up, starting with the Music Festival on Sunday, February 26 in the Iva Walker Auditorium at James A. Garfield High School, proceeding through the Community Night Out activities (3/2/12) and Grandparents Night (2/28/12) at the Portage County District Library and ending with the Fun Festival (FREE!) on March 3 at the Garfield Elementary building.  Make your reservations on the calendar right now and listen for the humming on the tracks.

There will be contests galore, face-painting and games, fun for everyone.  The Boy Scouts will be manning the food operations on Saturday.  Inflatables will be available for sliding, bouncing climbing, you-name-it.  Family Founders–couples married fifty years or more–are invited to attend Saturday’s festivities to receive recognition and a token  reward(Nothing compared to their families themselves, of course).

Any community members who’d like to participate and volunteer their time and expertise are welcome to contact Rotarians.  Check in with Delores at McCumbers-Brady Realty or with Amy at the Business Works, both on Main Street, Garrettsville and you can be a conductor too!

Besides all of that, clubs of District 6630 are looking for nominations for “Rotary Heroes”, individuals who exemplify the goals and principles of Rotary, worldwide (not necessarily Rotarians).  On April 11, the local group will be hosting Rotary Group Study Exchange students at a regular meeting and invite interested parties to attend.  District Rotary Youth Exchange students (Ours will be Jessica Lyons this year) will be meeting on April 14.

Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club meets on Monday evenings in the Kennedy Center at Hiram College; dinner at 5:30, meeting at 6:00.  You’re invited.

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LAF/SOMe, the Garrettsville Area Seniors Group is pleased to announce the following upcoming trips.  Reservations are required and should be made by calling The Villager at 330-527-5761. Trips are open to anyone over the age of 21 who wants to enjoy life!

 

Friday, February 10, 2012,  The Great Big Home and Garden Expo and the Cleveland IX Center.  Includes  event entrance ticket, transportation and gratuity.  Bus Leaves at 10 a.m. and will return to Garrettsville at approximately 6 p.m.  Cost $23 per person.  SEATING IS LIMITED.  Reservation required no later than February 3rd.

 

Wednesday, February 29, 2012.  Gaming at Presque Isle Casino and Dinner at the Ferrante Winery.

Enjoy the day with games of chance at the Presque Isle Casino in Erie PA., then on to an early dinner at the Ferrante Winery and Restorante in Geneva, OH.  Enjoy exquisite Italian cuisine while overlooking 65 acres of manicured vineyards in the Grand River Valley.  And of course, while we are there, if you choose, you may also enjoy a wine tasting of Ferrante’s award winning vino.  Bus will leave Garrettsville at 8 a.m. and return approximately 7 p.m.  Cost for this trip is $59 per person and includes transportation, bus gratuity, dinner and wine tasting at Ferrante and a casino bonus.  Reservation required, payment due no later than February 15th.

 

Wednesday, March 21, 2012, Lunch and a Show!

J.B. Productions presents “A Tribute Show” Direct from Las Vegas

and Branson, MO.  This very special tribute show will bring back to mind many of your favorite performers. With Frank Pisani as master of ceremonies, these exceptional look-a-like and sound-a-like entertainers will bring to the stage such greats as: Rod Stewart, Aretha Franklin, Jimmy Durante, George Burns, Cher plus others (subject to change). You’ll be absolutely amazed. Relive the special moments these stars represent.

Cost for this trip is $49 per person and includes transportation, lunch and the show.  Bus will leave Garrettsville at 10 a.m. and return approximately 5 p.m.  Reservation required, SEATING IS VERY LIMITED.  Payment required no later than March 2, 2012.

Windham Dirt Daubers, a 40 year old garden club, has decided to hang up their garden tools at the first of the year, citing declining membership as the primary reason. The club started May 10, 1971 after Susan Kauppila-Happel had envisioned forming a group of ladies to learn more about plants and flowers along with other related issues.   The members listed on the roster when they dissolved were Marilyn John, Diana Martin, Rita Light, Rita Greene, Debbie Davis, Angie Smithburger, Dawn Kahoun, Dona McGuire, and Lynnea St, John. Inactive members were Karen Hoskins, Pat Clayton and original member Pat Burns.

Over the years the group had been very busy in the community. They had planted flowering crab trees around the circle of the township Green, they landscaped the court yard at Katherine Thomas (K.T.) Elementary School, planted the garden in front of the community center, built, maintained and planted flowers at the welcome signs one sees as they enter the town. They also landscaped the school sign at the high school and held fundraisers for vinyl picnic tables for the high school and junior high.

More recently, the garden club has maintained and planted flowers at the gazebo, war monuments and post office along with the welcome signs.  The group not only planted the flowers, they watered them, weeded them and kept them looking great all season long. During the holiday season the group had always decorated the gazebo and served cookies for the community lighting ceremony, which they hope someone else will pick up where they left off.

Besides garden activities, the Dirt Daubers could be seen out supporting community causes as well. The group had worked with “Toys for Tots”, Salvation Army, the Athletic Boosters and had even purchased clothing for the children at K. T. Elementary Schools. They were committed to their community.

Along with working in their community, the group has had many guest speakers at their meetings speaking on a variety of topics that expanded their knowledge of gardening and other related topics. They even had a beekeeper come in to expand their knowledge of bees and how they relate to gardening. The club also had toured gardens over the years and most recently toured the Draime Estate Gardens in Howland which is owned by Kent State Horticulture. They were an active club that served their community diligently and will be sorely missed.

It was at the December township trustee meeting where Marilyn John, president of the club announced it was with great regret the garden club would disband on the first of January 2012. She cited declining membership and the age of current members was making it difficult to continue as the reasons behind the decision. John said she hoped the village and the township would continue to decorate for Christmas and has donated the decorations for the gazebo to the township.  The announcement at the meeting brought a statement from Chairman Dann Timmons, who said he was sorry to see them disband after being such an icon in the community for 40 years but he guessed it was a sign of the times, where as folks were just are not interested in garden clubs anymore.  Timmons,  along with the other two trustees, has vowed to see that the gazebo is decorated each year for the holidays.

The garden club will be sorely missed.

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Tired but triumphant after their successful Reverse Raffle and Silent Auction, the Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club moved on to business-as-usual at their 11/14/11 meeting.

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The Twentieth Century Club met at the home of Mary Furillo  on November 17th.  Members answered roll call by answering “Do you believe in angels?”

The program for the evening was presented by Maxine Nimtz on The Bishop’s Wife, a novel by Robert Nathan that was made into a movie in 1947.  She focused on the character of Julia Brougham in the novel.

During the meeting a motion was passed to donate to the People Tree and members decided on a gift exchange for the Christmas party.

Following the meeting, members socialized while being served pumpkin roll and beverages provided by the hostess and her co-hostess Shirley Miller.

The next meeting will be the Christmas party held at the home of Jan Boehm on December 15th.  Leah Schultz will serve as co-hostess.

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Members of 20th Century Club of Garrettsville met October 20 at the home of Joan Kropp.  Jan Chalker was her co-hostess.  Women answered roll call by naming a piece of world art that they admired.  The program featured Garrettsville’s own world-famous Joe Leonard and his wood carvings.  Joe brought with him his portfolio of carvings and a small griffin sculpture. He explained how he taught himself to carve by reading books on the subject,and how he created seventeen carrousel horses for the Disney project in France and two more afterwards for admiring customers.  His flying pegasus and a griffin are presently touring the world with fellow mythical characters from around the world.  The tour began in the US in New York City and will be on display in the Spring back in the US at the Natural History Museum in Cleveland. Another flying pegasus will be on display at an upcoming art show at the IX Center.

Besides his profession, Leonard is also known in the community for his role as Nelson Trustee and as the owner and driver of a vintage fire engine that can be seen at  local community and  charity events.  He also teaches carving workshops.

Following the program, pumpkin pie was served.  The next meeting will be held on November 17th at the home of Mary Furillo with Shirly Miller serving as co-hostess and Maxine Nimtz presenting the program.

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Garrettsville – In October the Garrettsville Eagles Club, F. O. E. 2705 sponsored the second annual golf outing to benefit the National Diabetic Research Center. The event was co-chaired by Matt Eisenman and Brian Mullins and generated $2,000 for the Center. In spite of the inclement weather, eleven teams participated in the scramble.

The Fraternal Order of the Eagles Grand Aerie, in partnership with the University of Iowa, established the Research Center at the University. The University is responsible for the facility while the Grand Aerie pledged the funds for the research.

When everyone  finished, a tie existed  between Team Mowren consisting of Wes Mowen, Mike Lawrence, Doug Berg and Eric Berg.  Team Walls members were Glenn Walls, Daryl Guyette and two players who came in late and their names are unavailable.

The individual winners were Doug Berg for Long Drive on Hole #7; Eric Berg on Hole #15, while Daryl Guyette and Brian Mullins scored closest to the pin on Holes #5 and #10 respectively.

After the event, the golfers returned to the Eagles Club for a steak dinner to receive their prizes for individual achievements and numerous door prizes.

Needless to say, the event’s success depended on the work of the large number of volunteers that worked the course and contacted local merchants for their donations.

The Club wishes to thank the local merchants and organizations for their generous support of this event. Gold Sponsors were Kelly and Ferraro Att-at-Law, Eaton Corp and The Garrettsville Eagles Club. Hole Sponsors were Morco Construction, Penney Auto Body, Carlton Harley Davidson, Wingate Alloy Inc., Ellerhorst Insurance, 3-D Electric, and Davey Tree.

Mark your calendars for Saturday, September 8, 2012 for next year’s event.

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Garrettsville-Hiram Rotarians are out and about again, with their annual–well, mostly–roadside clean-up on St. Rte 82 between Garrettsville and Hiram.  You know the line,”the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak”?  Well, it sort of applied  in this instance.  Those that were able to show up–they definitely showed in fluorescent vests–(several auxiliary possibilities were unable to make it) did yeoman service by removing several bags of the usual detritus–bottles, cans, paper, UTAOs (Unidentified Thrown-Away Objects) and some items best left unidentified too precisely.

This followed the meeting on October 3 when plans for the approaching Reverse Raffle and Silent Auction were put in train for the big event coming up on November 10 at SugarBush Golf. Sponsorships are available  for those wishing to make a contribution.  Tickets also can be obtained from any member.  A top prize of $ 1000 is mighty tempting and the auction items look good too.

The club maintained its community-minded chops once again by making a donation to the JAG MVP campus surveillance fund being mounted by a group hoping to place security cameras and equipment on school facilities to reduce threats to public safety and property security.  The possibility of securing a matching grant from Rotary District 6630 was also brought up; it will be investigated.

Steve Zabor, district-governor-in-waiting and member of the Mantua-Shalersville Rotary Club, is slated to attend the October 10 meeting.

Bob Jackson, secretary-treasurer par excellence, is sorely missed but recovering.  He will, no doubt, return better than ever, though that would be hard to do.

Mantua – 4C’s is raffling off a quilt called “Fruit of the Spirit, Fruit of the Orchard V” in the “Hunter’s Star” pattern. The drawing will be held on November 12 at the 4 C’s Craft Fair held in the Shalersville Township Hall from 9:00-3:00. The quilt maker is Ellie Monroe and tickets are available from her at $1.00 each or 6 for $5. The quilt will be on display at Monroe’s Orchard, 6313 Pioneer Trail from October 13 through November 11. All proceeds from the quilt raffle will go to support the food shelf. Ellie has been donating a quilt to benefit the 4 C’s, for several years and this year it is more important than ever because of the rising cost of food and the increase in numbers of people using the food shelf. Our heartfelt thanks go out to Ellie for her dedication.

Garrettsville –  Garrettsville Chamber of Commerce holds a $750 cash raffle with proceeds from the raffle going to scholarships for J. A. Garfield and Hiram College students. This year’s grand prize is $750 along with an added second prize food basket from local merchants and a third prize fun basket from local merchants. Tickets are on sale now and can be purchased from most Garrettsville merchants and eateries, as well as the Weekly Villager, Skylanes Bowling Alley, Huntington and Middlefield Banks. The ticket prices are 6 tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held October 20, 2011 at the close of Business Showcase located at J. A. Garfield High School Gym. The showcase opens at 5pm and closes at 8pm. Winners need not be present for the drawing.

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The  Literary Musical Club held their meeting on Sept. 14th at The Community Center in Nelson.We were pleased to have such a nice turn out. It is always nice to see all the members  come for our day out.
We celebrated everyone’s birthday all at one time. We had a birthday party for everyone. The tables were  birthday- decorated and we had birthday cake with all the trimmings. Each  member brought a birthday present. These presents were to be useful items that can be used to keep house. The items were gathered up and donated to the new home in Ravenna for the homeless women veterans. This home is supported by the Veterans of America. It is for women and they need your help.
Last month we gathered and went to lunch. Some husbands were there also. Always nice to share our good time with our partners.
Our next goal is to collect some handmade items to be used in a Santa Shop for the children in the Windham School. This is a place for the children to be able to come and buy a gift for their mother or father. We need some help in getting handcrafts for this program. All you members who are crafty please try to help us.
For the members who do not come to the meetings on a regular basis we need your help also.
The next meeting will be October 12. This will be a musical experience. Come and tap your toes and sing along. See you there.

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The September meeting of Heart of Doll Country was on September 6th, 2011. and all but one member were present.  After the reading of the minutes, and the treasurer’s report, the group discussed first the upcoming trip to the Kent Museum of Fashion to see the exhibit, “On the Homefront”, a Civil War display.  The date of October 8th was picked for this trip, with lunch at the Pufferbelly Restaurant to follow.

Next up was a discussion on the Christmas trees we decorate for the Geauga County Library.  We decided to do this at our next meeting, October 4th and members were asked to bring ornaments to help decorate the trees.  These are table top trees which are donated to the library, and distributed to patrons to decorate.  They are put on display at the various branches, and people bid on them to raise money for the library.

The next Luncheon was brought up, and we may not be able to hold it when we first discussed, due to doll people attending the UFDC convention those weekends.  Pat Dutchman will report back on this.

Our Christmas party will be held at the home of Carolyn Englert, on November 1rst.  It will be a potluck, and members are asked to bring an unwrapped, new toy to be given to charity.

At Share and Tell, member Sue Lehota talked about the travel dolls exchanged by her daughter and a lady in New Zealand on behalf of their respective children.  The dolls are sent with travel journals, and the two women exchange photos of where the dolls were taken and purchase accessories to be sent back.
Carolyn Englert gave a program on provenance in doll collecting, and shared a picture of her grandmother with the doll Carolyn inherited from her.  Provenance is the history of the doll, or any other collectible object, and adds to its value.
The next meeting will be held on October 4th, at the United Methodist Church in Garrettsville.  If you are interested in coming, or would like more information on the club, call Carolyn at 330-527-4888

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Newton Township – For months now, members of the Newton Township Cemetery Association have volunteered their time and energy to bringing new life to a piece of local history – several pieces, in fact.
Multiple headstones, monuments, and other grave markers – many as old as the early 1800s – have fallen into disrepair due to age, the elements, and the misfortune of vandalism, and literally lie in pieces throughout the cemeteries in and around Newton Falls. The Cemetery Association has been working long hours to mend, patch, and restore these markers as close to their original condition as possible and bring dignity back to the final resting places of so many former residents of the small town. Always a continual process, the workers have been doing as much as they can before the snow falls, while contending with the challenge of a humid Ohio summer, beating the heat by spending precious cooler morning hours among the quiet granite and marble, Association members have made significant progress in the restoration plan.
Last Thursday morning, members from the local American Legion Post 236 stopped by the cemetery down the street from the fire station to present a check to the Association volunteers. Opened in 1813 and considered the first hallowed ground in Newton Falls, this is just one of the seven cemeteries under the care of the Township. The funds will be used for construction materials to repair headstones and landscaping elements in an effort to further beautify and honor the sacred spaces.
If anyone is interested in helping out and could spare a few hours with the project, the Cemetery Association meetings are the third Thursday of each month at the Township Administration Building. Also, they plan to have an informational table at the Firefighters Auxiliary’s Chili Cook-Off on Saturday, October 1st. They would love to share with you how you could be a part of this historical undertaking.

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Garrettsville – The James A. Garfield Historical Society held their pot-luck picnic for the summer at the home of Iva Walker on August 15.  The food, as usual, was the highlight of the evening but plans for the approaching Antiques Appraisal Fair came in a close second.  A meeting held around a fire pit, with desserts on plates, can get plenty lively.  Stories are called for and recited, ideas drift in with the smoke.  Interest in all things historical…or hysterical…can take new and fascinating paths.  Volunteers (and the semi-coerced) were signed up for the fair and plans were laid for more activities throughout the year.  The uninvited mosquitoes and lightning bugs were in evidence as the gathering broke up.

Regular meetings of the JAGHS are held in the organization’s headquarters at the Mott Building on Garrettsville’s Main Street at 7:30 on every third Monday of the month.  All are invited.

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For all of you out there who’ve been just waiting to join the Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary Club but got hung up on the meeting night, here’s your chance.  The group is moving back to its Monday night time slot and will be convening at the Kennedy Center in Hiram at 5:30.  The food and the service at the Main Street Grille and Brewing Company were outstanding , greatly appreciated and may be utilized at a later date for special occasions but Mondays are the “dark night” at “the Mill” so the change requires a new venue.  Many thanks to the accommodating chef, staff and the Kepiches for their hospitality.

On August 23 and 30 the G-H club will be meeting for special programs with the Mantua-Shalersville club.  Regular programming begins after the Labor Day holiday, on September 12.  Everyone is invited.

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Windham – Last month seven members toured the Draime Estate Gardens in Howland, along with some guests and members of the Grass Roots garden club.  It is a private facility providing educational opportunities and hands on experiences to students of horticulture, art and science.  It is run by Kent State.  The 12 acre tour was magnificent.

The Dirt Daubers took part in the Windham Bicentennial parade July 30th, celebrating our 40 years as a club.

This month our guest speaker was Fred Youngem, a bee keeper.  He put on a wonderful program and even brought some of his bees, in a glass case, for us to see how busy, busy they are.
Next month we will meet at the home of Angie Smithburger on Sept. 12, at 7:00 with the program yet to be determined.

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Garrettsville – The August meeting of The Heart of Doll Country was held at Garrettsville’s United Methodist Church on August 2nd.  After the minutes and Treasurer’s report were read, members discussed some upcoming proposed trips.  A visit to the Museum in Erie, Pennsylvania to see a display of life-sized needle sculpted dolls, the Strongsville Doll and Bear Show, and Kent State Museum of Fashion were all proposed.  We will check to see what the current display is at Kent, and decide if we will be going.  A lively discussion about next year’s luncheon was held, and a Christmas in July theme was decided upon.  We also talked about where we will hold the Christmas party this year, since we are not going to be meeting over the winter months.  At Share and Tell, member Barbara Dupay showed a carved wooden doll she had purchased from The Toy Shoppe, as well as passing out some catalogs from there.  Carolyn Englert had her Bleuette-type doll that had belonged to her mother.  Pat Dutchman provided refreshments as well as a program on Travel Dolls.  Jean Lawrence won the door prize, a lovely tote bag.  Sue Lehota held an extra drawing, which Carolyn won, a beautiful Japanese American Girl small doll.  The Heart of Doll Country meets on the first Tuesday of the month, at the Methodist Church, anyone who loves or makes dolls is welcome.  For more information, email carenglert67@gmail.com.

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The Antique Tractor Club of Trumbull County has had a busy summer.  They’ve participated in many parades, open houses, block parties, and sold gallons & gallons of bean soup for the Ashtabula Tractor’s clubs summer show.  We donated time & tractors plowing a field for the Grace Fellowship Church’s new property on Kings Graves Rd. in Vienna and so many other things I don’t have the space to mention.
We’ve been planning & having meetings to promote and prepare for our Annual Summer Show to be held at 1653 Ridge Road, Vienna Ohio.  This years show will be three days — Friday, Saturday, Sunday the 19th, 20th & 21st.We have 3 classes of tractor pulls (kiddie pedal tractors, bring your own or use one of ours) they are very competitive and a lot of fun to watch, garden tractors and the larger tractors everyone likes to compete between tractor brands.  What’s it going to be this year, Red, Green, yellow, gray or blue.  Come watch your favorite.  This year we’re promoting Fords.  Come and see how well you can drive a tractor or ride in our special made wagon (with nice cushy seats) on a trip through the fields and woods.  We have free homemade ice cream for all kids 12 & under.  Come watch Nick make ice cream right on the spot and a dish you’ll never forget  There is something for everyone including a flea market.  If you need more information, you can call: Joe Toth @330-240-6407 or Terry Taylor @330-637-8946.

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Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary went into its international mode recently, entertaining Rotary Ambassadorial Scholars Yeonmin Kim of the Republic of South Korea and Sayuri Minakuchi from Japan at their August 10 meeting at the Main Street Grille and Brewing Company.  These well-spoken and personable individuals are both studying at Kent State University and made interesting presentations concerning certain cultural aspects of their homelands and their own educational paths.

Sayuri Minakuchi is a second-generation Ambassadorial Scholar; her mother had been designated as such during her scholastic career.  Sayuri spoke of the Japanese language, both spoken and written.  Japanese script is, basically, a simplified form of a system borrowed from the writing of China, employing seventeen sound elements–some English sounds are not among them.  Some  English/American words have appeared in modern Japanese usage without translation, especially in areas such as sports (baseball) or entertainment or food (pasta).  Students in Japan begin learning English as a second language from about the fifth grade level on.  Many international students–who have probably begun learning English in their respective countries at about the same time–come to the United States to study at least partly to improve their language skills, particularly in the area of idiomatic speech.  As is the case in most countries of the modern, industrialized world, some aspects of traditional culture are found side-by-side with western culture and can be confusing to the outside observer.
Yeonmin Kim spoke of  some social and political facets of  the Republic of South Korea,  where his Rotary District was #3670.  He is studying for a Ph.D. in Literature, with a focus on Irish literature, as he feels that there are certain similarities between South Korea and Ireland (Eire), particularly as regards the partition of the countries and their similar historical paths.  Political sensitivities and economics and hopes for unification play into the situations in both places.  The young father and former South Korean Marine also touched upon some topics that Americans actually did have a concept of, namely, tae kwan do and kimchi–a form of martial arts, and a signature Korean-style relish of sorts, that can do about as much damage as the fighting

Once again Rotary displays its bona fides  as a bridge between nations.

Addendum : the discussion continues for local Rotary groups–“sink or swim”…what stroke?  If you’d like to get into the conversation, visit your local club, they’ll love to have you and your suggestions.

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Ya got yer debt crisis.  Ya got yer deficit crisis.  Ya got yer health/obesity crisis.  Ya got yer apes takin’ over the planet.  What else can go wrong?

OMG!  It’s Rotary!

Well, actually, it’s sort of systemic thing.  Communal and fraternal organizations (not to mention churches) everywhere are facing declining membership and participation.  Where once-upon-a-time every little town had its own Odd Fellows, Masons, Kiwanians, Lions, Rotarians, and so on, meeting in their own halls or church basements or meeting rooms on a regular basis, nowadays groups have gone out of existence or consolidated with others still breathing, numbers are down at scheduled gatherings and cherished projects and activities for the good of the community are in danger of elimination and/or reduction.  Where have all the members gone?

Well, it’s at least partly societal…partly economic, for sure.  There didn’t used to be so many things for kids to be involved in–sports, arts, you know all that–and for their parents to be following (driving to).  There used to be more business owners who lived in town, not answering to a franchise headquarters.  There used to be fewer women working outside the home (They always worked inside the home). There used to be a slower pace about a lot of things.  That was then; this is now.  What to do?

Local Rotarians (Garrettsville-Hiram, Mantua-Shalersville…do you see the consolidation?) would like to seek some community input…maybe some new members with great ideas…in their quest to address this situation.  Each club has a history of contribution and meaningful activity (Think Talent Shows, Family Weeks, Santa Claus deliveries, group excursions, Christmas Walks, exchange students, roadside clean-ups, Power of the Pen, many more) which they are loathe to abandon.  Plans may be undertaken to more co-operative ventures but these are LOCAL groups within an INTERNATIONAL framework (Check out the Rotary International float entry in the Rose Bowl Parade) and they like to focus on the people that they see every day.

So…have you any contribution to make?  Are you an individual who would like to “give back” to the community?  Would you like to know more people in your community, to make a difference?  Would you like to meet with like-minded individuals to try to put some of your hopes and dreams into action/reality?  Got some great ideas? Could you put a group on Facebook or Twitter?  Willing to actually WORK–on your own and with others– to get those ideas on the map?  Have they got a deal for you!!!
Come to a meeting (If that’s a problem, try to get to at least one and explain the difficulty, none of them are written in stone).

Garrettsville-Hiram meets at 5:30 on Wednesdays at the Main Street Grille and Brewing Company; Mantua-Shalersville meets at a place and time to be discovered.  They will be happy to see you.  They will listen to suggestions.  They will quite possibly have a program that you’ll really enjoy and learn from.  Could be something that you’ll really groove on.  Give it a shot.  Expand your world…it IS Rotary International, after all.

Speaking of which…M-S Rotary annual picnic at Camp Hi August 17 (They did an excursion to Porthouse Theatre earlier this month)…G-H Rotary president just received the Paul Harris Fellow Award from the Rotary International Foundation and the club recently entertained two Rotary Ambassadorial Scholars.  This is good stuff.  Think about joining…or rejoining, they’ll be glad to have you.

Pictured: Wally Lininger (left) being presented the commemorative plaque by District Governor Dave Gauch. In other Lions news, the celebration of 54 years of service to the Windham community and Lions International was recently marked by the installation of new officers for 2011/2012.

Windham – Wally Lininger was recently honored for his long and dedicated service to The Windham Lions Club and Lions International by being presented the Melvin Jones Fellowship.

Lions International recognizes outstanding individuals by bestowing on them an honor that is named for its founder, Melvin Jones. This fellowship is the highest form of recognition and embodies humanitarian ideas consistent with the nature and purpose of Lionism. The recipient of this honor becomes a model because of the exemplary service to his club and the community for which he serves.

In other Lions news, the celebration of 54 years of service to the Windham community and Lions International was recently marked by the installation of new officers for 2011/2012.

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Garrettsville – The James A. Garfield Historical Society met in the Mott Building headquarters on Main St. to speak of “ many things, of shoes and ships and sealing wax, of cabbages and kings.”  Well, not exactly.
They did accept a   pair of donations from Roslyn Bauman–a green bottle imprinted “L. Caldwell, Garrettsville, and a flax spinning wheel.  Maintenance items came up :  cleaning and sorting and putting away costumes, especially those used in the recent vintage photo activity ($160–a good start for what may become an on-going fund-raiser), the garden fence needs painting, summer potluck picnic will be August 15, thoughts on re-applying for a Hiram Community Trust grant to do digitizing of microfilm files, thoughts on the approaching Business Showcase in the fall and the Windham Bicentennial which is upon us now…and the Antiques Appraisal Fair to be conducted at the Garfield Middle School in conjunction with a flea market/rummage sale benefiting the Garfield Middle School football program.  Coach Mark Apple was present to provide information on the football program plans and to discuss advertising proposals, printing options, concessions…lots of stuff.  Time and tide wait for no man…or woman or historical society.  Plans are rolling!
Tickets are ready.  Posters are on the way.  Newspaper advertising in several marketing areas–Record-Courier, Middlefield Post, Warren Tribune, Chagrin Times, Villager, etc.–is coming as well as a spot on the Garrettsville website and on Facebook.  Everybody know; everybody come!  August 20 from 1:00 to 5:00.

And speaking of the Antiques Appraisal Fair….
Do not confuse this with the popular TV program where amazed folks find out that a professional appraiser has just declared that Aunt Ida’s gilded chamber pot once belonged to Louis XIV and is worth thousand upon thousands.  But it is our very own, small-scale operation wherein four local professionals will give the lucky finders of attic-stashes of monumental proportions the news that most, if not all, of the detritus piled up in out of the way places in the house can safely be given away or disposed of…but that little carved-wood clock with the kookaburra instead of a cuckoo…hmmm…we might want to look at that more closely.   Should your treasures actually call for further investigation, you can, of course, at a later date talk to these folks who have generously donated their time, to pursue any further course of action which you might like to follow.
The chances of your finding a twin to the Koh-i-Noor diamond in Grammy’s jewelry box are slim but you might find out that Uncle Delt was actually a primitive painter of some repute and the bunch of his old scenes in the family home could be worth your while to dust off.  Antiques, at any rate, have fads and fashions like anything else and that big crock with naughty pictures inside might be just the thing this year when five years ago you couldn’t have sold it to Hugh Hefner.   Hang on to it, the wheel could turn yet again.
For a small fee (one item for $5, three for $10), if nothing else, you may get bragging rights about that antimacassar from Aunt Faye’s estate sale that turns out to be a snippet from the Bayeaux Tapestry that  Great , Great Grandma smuggled across the Alps tucked into her knickers as she was fleeing the Huns…or was it the Mongols?  At the very least, someone other than your family can give a little insight as to whether it’s the real McCoy or a really good copy.  And look around to see what kind of junk other people have in their attics.  Maybe you’re not the craziest folks on the block after all.  Maybe you have taste…. Maybe not..

Garrettsville – Garrettsville-Hiram Rotarians confronted a mystery at their recent meeting.  Speaker was Guy Alexander of Park Ave., Garrettsville, and he told of the boat in his house.
Embarking upon an renovation/remodel of his house in 2007, he recalled a chance conversation some years before with Adelle Cline (nee Baird) who had grown up in the residence and lived there after her marriage to Jim Cline and through the subsequent raising of three children.  While engaged in who-knows-what ministrations of the hair care personnel at  the Golden Mirror, she asked him if he had yet found the boat that resided above the dining room ceiling, something shown to the family by her father in the early twentieth century and, to all intents and purposes, likely to be still there–they had not removed it.
As it happened,  the remodeler needed access to the area in question and –lo, and behold–between the rafters and the lath-and-plaster, there rested the skeleton of a boat, two nested halves, a pair of slave collars(!) and some old batteries, along with newspaper clippings from 1898 concerning a popular player of the day, Homer Enos.  An interesting treasure  trove, no mistake!
After considerable investigation–Antique Road Show and a number of other avenues, such as the Smithsonian Institution–Guy found that he was in possession of a “portage boat” or “slave boat”  used during the era of the Underground Railroad (Which, you may recall, was not always underground, nor had it any rails, though the roads were many and  so too the conductors and the passengers).  Only one other specimen is thought to be in existence, and that in Canada.  One appraisal firm in Cleveland put its value at “priceless”–not real helpful, when you get right down to it.  The collars–one had a metal nameplate reading “W. F. Brown” in ornate script–were far more common and a Wm. Brown (pauper) was found  listed at that address in a census search of the decade.
The “portage boat” might be classified as what archivists/historians/archaeologists and their ilk call “ephemera”, things that were not designed to last, in this case they were to be put together quickly, covered with a canvas or leather skin, used to cross a stream or body of water, then dismantled (Under the Fugitive Slave Act, one could be arrested and tried for aiding and/or abetting a runaway slave, so   the evidence was destroyed whenever possible).  How did the bones of the boat get in the ceiling over the dining room?  Nobody knows. The house has  paper trail back to at least 1895, possibly 1860–lots of records were lost in a fire at the old courthouse in Ravenna many years ago.  There apparently a construction project of some sort at this address in 1908.  Was it found or moved around then by the Bairds?  Mystery still.
Then , of course, there are the unexplained shadows and creaks and footsteps…the nearby tunnels to the creek, possibly used by the UGRR–Northeast Ohio was pretty strong Abolitionist territory….  Who knows how much more of the story waits to be uncovered?

Garrettsville – The James A. Garfield Historical Society extended a thank you to the proprietors of Chic-N-Shabby for assistance rendered and put out a call for costumes for the Vintage Photo Fair to be held at the Garrettsville SummerFest.  (A success for both events).  The trip  to the Hudson Library and Historical Society was also adjudged interesting and definitely worthwhile.  Volunteers for the photo op were recruited;  a tentative schedule was outlined. Posters and flyer proposals were checked out, other prep work as well.  A grant application to the Hiram Community Trust has been submitted for acquiring microfilm from the Ohio Historical Society.The building will be open for Cruise Night on July 16, possibly for vintage photos as well.The Appraisal Fair arrangements are on-going; public relations (information and flyers) will be distributed soon.  All attic explorers are urged to come to get a local expert’s best estimation of what some of their newly-uncovered treasures might be worth.  A professional appraisal firm operating out of Delaware, Ohio (Garths) has indicated interest in becoming involved at a future date.  Things are moving forward…or backward, if you count the antiques, for the event to be held at the  James A. Garfield Middle School on August 20.  Trash or Treasure,  that is the question.  Come to find out.  Family pieces and family stories all have their interesting points but remember,      “Nobody really cares what your Grandma had except your Grandpa.”

Literary Musical Club (LMC) held their June meeting with a covered dish picnic. As usual the food was good and plenty of it. Thanks to Alma Jones for being such a nice hostess. It’s a shame only half of our members attend. Our business meeting was short with not much happening. We did decide on a Christmas fund raiser. Our program was put on by Jeanne Pfeiffer.  The art of “quilling”. She gave a nice presentation with lots of samples for show-and-tell. Maybe she’ll come back and give a class. Next meeting will be July 13. Special recognition was given to Margaret Clapp. She is our oldest member and her name has been on the membership since back when she was a teenager a good 75 years ago. She was presented with a music box. She has always been an active member. Thanks, Margaret, for being you. Our visitor was Rosemary Angel from Delaware.

Members of the Garrettsville-Hiram Rotary took a field trip to the wilds of the Hiram College Barrow Field Station on Wheeler Rd to be enlightened on the scope and purpose of the operation of the facility.  One of Hiram College’s curricular centers, its focus is on the Study of Nature and Society, and its director is Matt Hils,  professor of biology at the college and the presenter of the program.

Study of Nature and Society encompasses the history of the various views of Nature, either in the Biblical understanding of humans in the world, the Wilderness outlook, the aspect of Conquest, the Romantic perception, the Dawn of Conservation, the Aldo Leopold land ethic or the warnings of Rachel Carson through the New Millennial Environmentalism and business practices with a Sense of Place.

The Field Station itself began with the late Professor James Barrow who arranged for the acquisition of some three hundred eighty-four acres in 1967.  Since that time the majors offered involving the station have grown from simply environmental studies and biology to areas involving education, research, conservation…nearly any course of study that can be linked to interaction of people and their environment.  There are programs offering courses, seminars and public outreach.  There are co-operative ventures involving outside agencies such as the Akron Zoo, the Portage County Park District, the Audubon Society, CWRU in both natural and built environments.  There is research in topics such as endangered waterfowl and forest ecology.  Support has been broad, including the Ohio Prairie Nursery, with special appreciation to the Frohring Foundation over many years.

Continuing areas of interest and study include Exploring Today’s New Standards, Is the Environment a Valid Overhead Expense?, Geothermal Heating & Cooling (currently in use at the center), increasing the protection of the Silver Creek Watershed.  Friends of the Field Station offer frequent programs and activities at the station and in the surrounding community.

The question of  “Nature and Society…Part or Apart” is being asked and answers considered every day at the Hiram College Field Station.