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Garrettsville – The Garfield Cheerleaders are kicking off their upcoming cheer season with a mulch fundraiser. 100% of the proceeds go to the cheer program to help support competition fees, camp costs, and spirit supplies.

Gallagher's Mulch Fundraiser Garfield Schools

Pictured left to right are GHS Cheerleaders Courtney and Mikaela Siracki are ready to take your mulch orders with GHS alumni, Dan and Tyler Gallagher of Gallagher Farms Mulch and Sawdust

Purchase quality bulk mulch for your landscaping needs from your local GHS Cheerleader or call Coach Shannon Gallagher at 330-842-0015 to pre-order your mulch.

Choose from double ground bark mulch for $23 a yard or dyed mulch for $28 a yard, (black, red, or dark brown.) There is a 3 yard minimum plus a $20 delivery fee. Small yard? No problem! Split a load with your neighbor.

Mulch is supplied by Garfield Alumni, Dan and Tyler Gallagher of Gallagher Farms Mulch and Sawdust. They are pleased to support GHS and the Garfield Cheerleaders.

Thank you in advance for supporting the Garfield cheer program! *\o/* Go-G-Men!

Mantua – For the 10th consecutive year, the Crestwood Outdoor Education Committee held an Earth Day festival at the Crestwood Primary School. While Mother Nature made it difficult to hold the festivities outside, holding the event indoors didn’t hamper the success of the evening’s event.

Aided by parent volunteers, as well as those from Crestwood Middle and High Schools, the event featured twenty earth-friendly stations for students and their families to enjoy. Habitat hikes were held outdoors, and stations offered a variety of hands-on activities and fun for all ages.  Families enjoyed giveaways like tree seedlings and sunflower seed planters, and gained  access to plant and animal facts and expertise from area naturalists, master gardeners, and wildlife experts.

Kids enjoyed speaking to beekeepers, learning about rocks, and finding out where storm water flows. They also enjoyed face painting and crafts like making radish seed necklaces. But the high point for many was the owl craft, where children and adults had the opportunity to make a simple art piece from reclaimed barn wood, leather scraps, and other odds and ends. The wood for the ‘barn owls’ was provided by the Stamm family.

Garrettsville - Six shiny, brand-new TRUPER shovels.  Hard hats.  A pile of dirt brought in and lined up especially for the occasion.  Students, educators &  administrators, township trustees, construction officials dignitaries interested citizens.  Photo opportunities—with or without dirt—of all sorts.  A backdrop of soil on the move, big machines, flagged stakes, safety fencing, a changing façade of the elementary school as its addition takes shape.  The Marching Pride.

They were all there on the official groundbreaking ceremony held on May 8, 2014 at the James A. Garfield K-6 Elementary School Addition. Board president Guy Pietra managed introductions and recognitions  The governor sent a liaison, Tim Ross, with a proclamation.  The superintendent spoke of the challenges of the construction, the expectations and resources as part of the project overview.  Grace Edwards, a 5th grade student, brought a historical viewpoint and an appreciation of the Park Avenue school.  Andy Lininger  and Laura Wilburn spoke of the skills learned , mentors encountered, groundwork laid in the elementary school for future success.  Mayor Rick Patrick offered the description of the occasion as a milestone.  Bob McAuliffe, Jr. of the Hammond Construction Company made reference to the teamwork involved in the whole enterprise. Superintendent Ted Lysiak encouraged all in attendance to cherish the memories and remember the path of the changes  leading to tomorrow with educators as builders.   Board vice president David Vincent gave closing remarks and thanks.  Then it was on to the shovels!

And refreshments, of course.

Portage County – On Friday, April 25, 2014, at NEOMED’s Ralph Regula Conference Center there was a swirl of competitiveness at this year’s 23rd annual Portage County Literacy Coalition Spelling Bee.

spelling-beeIn the beginning of the Bee, the teams:  Community Action Council of Ravenna, Deluxe, Inc. of Streetsboro; NEOMED of Rootstown; and the Mavericks were battling for a victory.   Each team didn’t give up the bout, but held on tight and continued spelling word after word.  The tension rose as the teams clashed for the yearly PCLC Spelling Bee trophy.  Words like:  “Blatherskite,” “crepuscular,” and “per diem” were spelled.  It was a struggle to the very end and finally it was down to two teams.

After 16 years of competing in the Portage County Literacy Coalition’s Spelling Bee, this year’s trophy was finally won by NEOMED of Rootstown.  We congratulate Debbie Myers, Bryan Zeppernick, and Theresa “Terry” Schoettler of Team NEOMED for finally achieving the win.   Also, we would like to note a gracious recognition to Gail Hansen and Jean Spain from NEOMED that were unable to make it to the Bee.

We would like to thank all of the area businesses that took part in this year’s Spelling Bee and also to those who generously donated items.  Because of all our community partners the PCLC Spelling Bee was a success.

The Portage County Literacy Coalition is a non-profit that raises literacy awareness in Portage County and supports the Adult Basic and Literacy Education Program at Maplewood Career Center.  All money raised from the PCLC Spelling Bee goes towards materials and scholarships for those achieving their GED.  The PCLC welcomes volunteers and new board members.  If you are interested in finding out more about the Portage County Literacy Coalition, please call (330) 235-0020.

 

MantuaHistorical Mantua – Carol Denzinger, pictured, was the guest speaker at the April meeting of the Mantua Historical Society; she gave an excellent presentation of Mantua’s bygone days. She is displaying Stamm Contracting calendars, where the main character is the Gay Old Philosopher. If you were looking for a good time, on a Friday night and could go back in time, you would find it in downtown Mantua in the 1950’s. Farmers finishing up with their field work and  workers coming home would head to town, because businesses, like Hammel’s and Haylett’s grocery stores, Weber Hardware store, the lumber yard, the bank, etc., stayed open late (9:00 p.m.). There would have been music in  the streets, because the high school band would march to town and set up to  play music. THE GOOD OLD DAYS!

The next meeting of the Historical Society, on May 19th, will be a road trip to the Shalersville Historical Society’s museum on S. R. #44; we will meet at 7:00 p.m. for our meeting and to tour their museum, our host will be Ron  Kotkowski. Light refreshments will be served. The group welcomes new members; dues are $8 per person or $12 per family; meetings are every third Monday of the months from March to October at the Mantua Township Hall’s  lower level, located at S. R. 82 and Mantua Center Road.

garrettsville-strong-softball-team-north-akron-winners-softballAkron - The Garrettsville Strong charity softball team won the North Akron 2nd Annual Spring Warm up and raised over $1,000 (including fund raising uniform t-shirts by the Villager), and still counting, for the Gville fire fund!! The donations will be made  in the name of Garrettsville Youth Softball and the Ohio Outlaws to the Garrettsville Strong fund.

Great job ladies!! For a team that never played together before, they had great team chemistry and teamwork, going 5-0 on the weekend. The girls scored on 3 home runs, a grand slam by Autumn “Cali” Belviy, suicide squeeze play, multiple doubles and triples, tons of beautiful bunts. Great job catching by Shelby Mayes, dominating pitching by Angela “Maz” Masiello and Madison “Maddog” VanKirk, an awesome throw from center field by Torrie Gall to almost gun a runner out at first, (Threw it so hard it bent the first baseman’s glove back and it came out), Meg Visocan played every position except catcher including pitcher. Every young lady had a highlight and contributed across the board — can’t even remember them all!  On top of all that, the pitchers and catcher were calling their own games, at 12 yrs old, and did it beautifully!

The GarrettsvilleStrong roster consisted of: Garrettsville Cal’s Gals Angela Vanhorn,  Emma Lawrence, and Chloe Pfile; Garrettsville Hotshots  Gracie Pignaloso, Sarah Shearer and Anna Weaver; Garrettsville –  Madison VanKirk; Crestwood –  Angela Masiello and Torrie Gall;  Crestwood Victory –  Maddy Cline and Alexis Schultz; Outlaws –  Hailey Eckelberry, Autumn Belviy  and Shelby Mayes; Explosive Black – Meg Visocan. Coaches were David Pignaloso, Scott Vanhorn, Tom VanKirk and Dan Masiello.

Thank you to “dugout moms” Becky VanKirk and Tara Vanhorn and special thanks to  Karen Visocan, and daughter Meg, for helping out and more than doubling our donations with some additional fund raising!!

Thanks GYS, Ohio Outlaws Fastpitch, to all who participated, donated, and rooted us on, could not have done it without you!!!

 

cis-mantua-schools-art-visit-cleveland-museum-of-art-cmaMantua - For the second year in a row, fifth grade students and parents from Crestwood Intermediate School toured the Cleveland Museum of Art during two special Saturday field trips in early spring. Crestwood Intermediate Art teacher Patty Timbrook received the grants, which funded the trips, from the Hiram Community Trust.

Each grant covered the cost to transport two groups of students and chaperones to the museum. In addition, each grant also provided funds for three Ipads to allow students to research the trip, and to use during the excursions. After the field trips, the iPads are used regularly in Timbrook’s CIS art classroom.  According to Timbrook, “Last year’s students created a digital album of the CMA’s Egyptian collection in preparation for their trip to the museum. Students shared this album with the trip chaperone on the bus on the way to Cleveland.”

For many students and parents, this was the first time they had been at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Several parents hadn’t visited the museum since they were children and were awestruck by the changes what they saw. Timbrook marveled, “Many people mentioned that they will go back; that they were interested in the other museums in Cleveland, as well as other art museums in nearby cities, which was one of goals of this program.”

To prepare students for the trip, Timbrook showed short videos and photos of pieces from the museum’s collection on Ipads, which prompted discussions about what students would see there. Timbrook explained to students that people come from all over the world to see what CMA has to offer, but that her lucky group can get there in just a short ride.

At the museum the group was free to view any galleries during the visit. Timbrook remarked, “They loved the Egyptian gallery since we do a lengthy mummy and Egyptian project in the art room. Next year I plan on having a scavenger hunt at the museum – find Monet’s water lilies, Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe etc.”

The trip to the Cleveland Museum of Art is limited to fifth graders, and is funded through the Hiram Community Trust. Each year, Timbrook leads groups of third graders through the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown. Fourth graders visit the Akron Art Museum. In addition, during NEOEA Day in October, she took 20 Intermediate, Middle and High School students and a few parents to KSU and Hiram College to tour their art facilities.  Students toured the facilities and watched artist demonstrations in the various studios. This program was funded by the Hiram Community Trust, as well, and offered gifted art students with a great introduction to potential college majors in that field.

“I think it is essential that kids learn about other cultures, history, art history, and about themselves through art education and by seeing this outside of the classroom at our local museums. They can’t take it all in through one visit but I feel that I planted the seed,” beamed Timbrook.

        

 Alyssa Perez and her parents investigate an exhibit at the Cleveland Museum of Art through a Crestwood Intermediate School program funded by the Hiram Community Trust.  

       Photo provided by Patty Timbrook

 

Windham Twp. – The Windham Township Trustees met for their regularly scheduled meeting on May 1, 2014 with all trustees, fiscal officer, five residents and one guest in attendance. The trustees approved the minutes and expenditures for the month of April.

This old church on Silica Sand  Road  has  been the subject of complaints and discussions over the course of the year, especially the last two trustee meetings. The trustees are looking into getting a Community Block Grant to have the structure demolished.

This old church on Silica Sand Road has been the subject of complaints and discussions over the course of the year, especially the last two trustee meetings. The trustees are looking into getting a Community Block Grant to have the structure demolished.

Mark Russell from Ellerhorst Russell Insurance was in attendance to review the insurance policy that is up for renewal. After some questions, and then a discussion, the trustees approved the policy with amendments. The fiscal officer will add the amendments before the policy is signed.

In roads, Supervisor Brian Miller said he has been in contact with the Portage County Engineers and it appears there may be some Ohio Public Works Funds available for the township to use for resurfacing roads. Miller suggested Bryant Road. After some discussion, the trustees thought Colton Road should be considered as well. Miller will also have a representative from the engineer’s office look at Colton Road and see if either or both roads would qualify for the funding. Dann Timmons reported that he is in the process of talking to the property owners on Frazier Road before they proceed with Mr. Soinski’s proposed cul-de-sac. In other road news, the township workers have been kept busy during the rain, by cleaning up trash, trimming back trees and brush along the sides of the roads.

In cemetery news, Trustee Rich Gano received the pins to lay out more graves and as soon as it dries up a bit he will get them done. They also have 20 graves that will need foundations poured this month.

The trustees are in charge of this year’s Memorial Day Services and will ask Lt. Col. Ed Meade from Camp Ravenna to be the speaker.  Timmons will contact Lt. Col. Ed Meade to see if he is available, along with the usual participants, Gano will handle the parade line-up and Miller will get the cemetery set up for the service.

In zoning, Joe Pinti reported that there have been no new permits written but many inquiries on decks, fencing and such.  The trustee received proposed zoning changes from the zoning commission and will hold a public hearing on the issues on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at the town hall at 7 pm.

Timmons reported that they heard from Mark Finamore on a ruling on the alleged breach of contract by the village, when they discontinued dispatch services to the fire district contract. Finamore believes there is some village liability there and if they wanted to proceed with legal action they could. After some discussion on the matter, the trustees have decided to share the opinion with the fire board for review. In other safety issues Timmons reported that the fire board decided to go with a 4 mill renewal levy on the November ballot rather than increase it.

In old business, the township clean-up went well. Miller inquired where the township stood on the old church on Silica Sand Road. Gano said as soon as he determines who owns it he will proceed with trying to obtain a Community Block Grant to have it torn down. Timmons said the auditor’s records should be able to tell who owns it. Gano will start there and see if they can’t get the matter resolved.

In other township news, the trustees approved Bill Isler’s proposal to remove the light poles from the “Township Green” and they also approved the acquisition of a debit card for the township use.  The fiscal officer reported that due to the Affordable Care Act, the township now has to tax, the reimbursements to its employees for healthcare costs.

The meeting was adjourned and the June meeting will be held on June 5, 2014 at the town hall at 7pm.

 

Photo provided by Michelle Gerbrick

Photo provided by Michelle Gerbrick

Mantua – Recently, students at the Crestwood Intermediate School received a surprise gift of technology to help them with their studies. According to Crestwood Intermediate Principal Michelle Gerbrick, the school recently received an anonymous donation of over $10,000. The donation was earmarked to purchase a computer cart and thirty laptops for student use. The cart also serves as a charging station for the laptops.

The cart enables an entire classroom with enough computer workstations for each student, offering more opportunities for access to technology. In the past, each class has been limited to a brief, weekly Technology class in the school’s computer lab. The cart is used in CIS classrooms, from grades three through five.

“The lab will come in handy for testing, integrating technology into the classroom, and so much more.” beamed Crestwood Intermediate Principal Michelle Gerbrick. The gift to the Crestwood Intermediate School was made possible through a generous donation from an anonymous benefactor from Aurora.

 

armstrong-burial-arlington-vietnam-veteranArlington, VA - Decorated Vietnam War hero and Class of 1965 Garfield High School graduate Robert Earl Armstrong was buried with full military honors at Arlington Cemetery on April 25. Serving with the U.S. Army’s 4th Infantry Division in 1969, then-Sergeant Armstrong distinguished himself in two separate incidents.  In  one – a massive ambush in the Mang Yang Valley – he stepped up to take command of his platoon after all officers and other NCOs were either killed or wounded.  In recognition of his bravery and resourcefulness, the United States awarded him the second highest U.S. military honor for valor, the Distinguished Service Cross.  In the other separate incident, near Polei  Kleng, Armstrong’s  extraordinary efforts to save other squad members earned him the third highest honor for valor, the Silver Star.  His heroism also earned him the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry, with silver cross, and a Purple Heart.  Armstrong died in October 2013 in North Carolina.

After returning from Vietnam seriously wounded, this American hero took every opportunity to honor and help every  veteran he encountered in the ensuing 43 years.  He was instrumental in the building of the Mecklenburg County Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Charlotte, North Carolina, and was the author of the inscriptions on the face of that memorial.  Despite challenging health issues over much of his adult life, Armstrong traveled  to Washington, D.C. on Veterans Day and Memorial Day each year, to honor those fallen whose names are inscribed on the Vietnam War Wall on the Mall.

In addition to his widow Susan (Maher) Armstrong, sons Mark and Troy and their wives and children, and brother Jeffrey Armstrong, more than 40 other family and friends, former comrades, other veterans, and Garrettsville classmates attended the services at Arlington.

missy-steele-garrettsville-ceramic-mugGarrettsville - This view of Garrettsville is especially important to ceramic artist Missy Steele who moved from Garrettsville to Pittsburgh when she was 18, but still has family is still here. “This is where I did most of my growing up, and this is where I return for holidays and special occasions. Honestly, it’s the place I still call home.” says Steele.

When glazing the mugs it was important to Steele to recreate her view of Main Street, arriving from the East. Steele chose to recreate a view that she would see on any given trip—busy with cars visiting Garretsville’s many local shops and businesses, an open sky scattered with clouds. A typical afternoon in Garrettsville. This is the way Steele will remember Main Street.

Each mug is handcrafted on the potter’s wheel; a handle is then made and attached. Every detail is painted on by hand, and the mug is fired once before glaze is applied and once after. No molds are used in Steele’s process, and the glazes are mixed by hand. No commercial materials are used. For Steele, these mugs were an effort of love and she has dedicated her time to making each one special and unique. No two are exactly alike.

As soon as Steele heard about the fire, she knew that she wanted to help in some way. Living in Pittsburgh, she knew there wasn’t a lot that she could do locally, but by creating one-of-a-kind mugs Steele could help generate more funds than she would be able to donate on her own.

While supplies last, you can purchase a limited edition, hand-made, Garrettsville mug for a minimum donation of $35. Mugs are available for purchase at the Weekly Villager/Chamber of Commerce Office located at 8088 Main Street or the Garrettsville Branch of Middlefield Bank located at 8058 State Street. 100% of your donation goes to the GarrettsvilleStrong fund. The mugs are microwave safe, dishwasher safe, and, of course, food safe.

Missy Steele is a 2004 graduate of James A. Garfield Local Schools, and a 2014 graduate of Carlow University in Pittsburgh, receiving her Bachelor of Art degree in Ceramics.

 

hiram-pancakes-for-kidsHiram - On April 19th the Hiram Police Department held its annual Pancake Breakfast fund raiser for the “Shop with a Cop” program. The event was a success in that $755.00 was raised for the program. “Our Shop with a Cop program (Hiram and Garrettsville) is one of the biggest programs of the year. The Shop with a Cop program provides Crestwood/Garfield School District children, and their families, the opportunity to enjoy the holiday season. The program is designed for less fortunate and under privileged children to go Christmas shopping, for themselves and families, with a police officer. The program brings about much heartfelt joy to a lot of area children and families. Our goal is that every child gets the chance to enjoy the holiday season.” Chief Ed Samec said. The Pancake Breakfast had a surprise visit from the Easter Bunny and was a huge hit with the kids. Special THANK YOU to Hiram College, AVI’s Diane, Beth, and Lindsey, Windswept Farms, Maggie’s Donuts, the Easter Bunny, and all of the people who attended and graciously support the event. “I am overwhelmed at all of the support and encouragement that Hiram Police Department receives from the community, it really is heartwarming that so many people believe in us and our community programs”.

Newton-Falls-OlympicsNewton Falls -   Saturday, May 3 turned out just fine for our 6- to 12-year-olds in Newton Falls.  The sun even made a few appearances.  The Kiwanis Club of Newton Falls, with the help of Coach Bugos and the track team, hosted a fun athletic competition which included track and field events.

From year to year, no one knows what to expect from Mr. Kellner’s creative obstacle course, and this year’s course was a challenge.  The children also enjoyed the softball throw, which measures accuracy as well as distance.  Some students had their first try at the long jump, and luckily, had more than one try.  Track events included 25-meter, 50-meter, 100-meter, and 200-meter races, where children were divided by male/female and by age group.

Thank you’s go out to all who helped in this event.  Kiwanis would like to thank the school and school board for permission to use the facility, the secretaries who handled registration forms, Zack Hogue at the microphone for events and awards, Positive Images for shirt printing, Mr. Bugos and track team, and the Kiwanis volunteers.  We hope to see the children wearing their olympic t-shirts around town.

WaterSentinelProgramMantua – The Ohio Sierra Club Clean Water Campaign invites participants to learn about the Cuyahoga River and its wonderful aquatic critters in this May hike and macroinvertebrate hunt.

The event will run from 2:00pm until 5:00pm on Saturday, May 10th and participants will meet at Buchert Memorial Park pavilion. The event will start with a hike on a paved trail and will conclude with a search for macroinvertebrate species in the Cuyahoga River.  Participants should bring waders or boots if they wish to enter the water. Otherwise, comfortable hiking attire is appropriate.

Sierra Club will be joined by Ohio Department of Natural River’s (ODNR’s) Scenic River Program and will identify creatures with the help of their staff and aquatic monitoring equipment.

Aquatic macroinvertebrates are organisms that have no backbone and can be seen with the naked eye. They are seen living on the streambed, along stream banks, and on or underneath rocks and materials in Ohio’s waters.

“A diverse and high amount of macroinvertebrates indicate clean water so we’re hoping we see a lot of critters at this event!” said Clean Water Fellow Ryan Ainger.

To register for this event, email Ryan Ainger at ryanainger@gmail.com

NFScoutsNewton Falls – Boy Scout Troop 112 of Newton Falls was rechartered by Amvets Post 112 in 2010. Since then every spring the boys have taken on the task of cleaning up the walking path in Newton Falls. This year, with a growing number of boys coming into the troop, we were able to have 2 groups of boys go in 2 different directions. The first group of boys cleaned up the path going towards the community center and baseball fields. They also took on the task of cleaning up the community pond. The second group went from the covered bridge out to main street and back up North Center St. Keeping America Beautiful is sponsored by the Geauga Trumbull Solid Waste Management District which donated garbage bags, gloves and wild flower seed packets.

Pictured from L-R Back: Billy Simmons, Alex Shearer, Jason Jones, Assistant Patrol Leader Harrison Bates, Nathaniel Saylor, Larry Cline (behind Nathaniel), Anthony Bailey, Patrol Leader Vincent Bailey, BJ Thomas. Front L-R Johnny Staton & Chad Bates. (not pictured: Jr. Assistant Scout Master Matthew Gushura, Senior Patrol Leader Bucyrus Palo, Chaplains Aide Alan Cohn.)

For more information on Boy Scout Troop 112, Please contact Trish Gushura at 330-507-3886 (text or call), troop112@yahoo.com or visit Boy Scout Troop 112 on Facebook.

 

kiwanis-girl-scouts-newton-fallsThe Kiwanis Club of Newton Falls recently welcomed Girl Scout Troop 239 and their leader, Pat Leach, to a regular meeting.  The club wanted to recognize the work that the girls have done.  They made dresses, which will be taken by a missionary, for little girls in Haiti.  The Scouts washed, ironed, measured, followed a pattern, sewed, and trimmed many dresses.  Kiwanis appreciates their spirit of helping others.

ken-fox-music-teacher-retirement-garrettsville-garfield-elementary“Twelve years, 36 concerts and over 20,000 attendees” is how James A. Garfield Superintendent Ted Lysiak introduced elementary school music teacher Mr. Ken Fox for his farewell concert last week.  Fox, who will be retiring from teaching at the end of this school year, said he will miss his students and is very appreciative of the opportunity he has had to work with them.

Last Tuesday the first grade students performed the night’s concert, titled Green.  The students, decked out in green leaf leis, danced, clapped, jumped and sang along with their teacher in a lively tribute to Earth Day offering readings and musical selections including “It’s Easy Bein’ Green”, “Nature Baby”, My Earth, and “What Do You Do With A Water Waster”.

Mr. Fox plans to keep busy after his retirement and is considering all his options.  When asked what he felt his greatest accomplishment in the past twelve years of teaching was he said it is when former students make a point of “looking him up and saying hello”.

horseMantua - Frustrated? Anxious? Overwhelmed? Resentful? Restless? Confused?

If so, it’s time for a change — a retreat from the everyday, surrounded by nature, so you can clarify the root of what’s nagging you, then identify the goals and objectives to help you chart a new course that will bring you lasting satisfaction. It’s time to bring in the horses.

Yes, horses.

L-E-A-D is an unconventional approach to leadership, team building, coaching and personal growth developed by human resources management professional Sue E. Thomas of Mantua. She utilizes horses in a unique experiential approach to awaken one’s potential in personal and professional development.

Thomas founded Leadership Equine Assisted Development, LLC in 1999. She has extensive experience in business, human resource management, and with horses. Certified in a number of counseling disciplines, Thomas is is a Professional Certified Coach through the International Coach Federation and holds a master’s degree in Organizational Development and Analysis.

Thomas combines her backgrounds in executive and life coaching, organizational development, and personal/leadership development, to connect people to their life purpose, vision and values. “Working with the horses provides awareness of what holds you back, to be successful and obtain the life you desire,” she said.

At a recent What About Me? Workshop at her 40-acre farm, Thomas led a group of women through a two-day exploration in personal development, defining personal struggles, boundaries, dreams, frustrations, goals and objectives. Horses Flash, Jazz, Boss and Whiskey provided helpful feedback every step of the way. (The resident cats and golden retrievers provided comic relief.)

“This workshop provides space and a comfortable environment to look at the ‘who’ you are today by gently peeking at the past, living in the present, and looking at your future desires,” Thomas explained. “We guide you in self-exploration, and provide room for you to release what no longer serves you, strengthen what does, and gain awareness needed to direct your desired future.”

By placing each woman in a vulnerable situation with a horse — and a specific objective to accomplish inside the arena with that horse — participants quickly learned to use clear, concise, consistent modes of communication to prompt the horse through a particular exercise or obstacle course.

For example, in one exercise, each participant was instructed to take a raw egg and draw symbols or write words that identified their most valued elements of life (faith, family, health, a career, etc.) on the shell. Then, each person had to balance their egg on a spoon while leading a horse (which represented “the stuff in life you’ve got to get done”) through an obstacle course — without dropping their egg. Unfortunately, the horse was skittish about walking over the white poles along the course, and tended to shy away, pushing or pulling the participant off balance. It was a good metaphor for the common struggle to achieve balance in this life while pursuing dreams, despite stresses at work and demands from loved ones, or whatever the situation may be.

Results were mixed, depending on the approach each participant took. Two made slow, halting progress with close calls along the way, but crossed the finish line with victorious smiles. Another paid too much attention to the horse, lost track of her egg, and was horrified when she lost control of all she held dear, just to see it drop into the mud. Yet another participant marched her horse through its paces in record time, holding her egg in steady balance from start to finish (the sign of a chronic multi-tasker).

Other exercises involved leading horses while blindfolded; depending upon a partner’s verbal instructions to accomplish the task. Some activities focused on personal initiatives; others on group dynamics, trust and cooperation skills. Depending on each person’s body language, personal boundaries and subconscious cues, the horse would respond agreeably, or with stubbornness, playfulness or aloofness. Working with the horses heightened each participant’s awareness of their environment, their fears and vulnerabilities, their potential for growth, and their opportunity to change limiting behaviors that provided measurable results.

The most cited result of the workshop was clarity: the ability to clear the cobwebs and concretely identify the root of frustrations, learn how to put it into words, then devise a concrete plan to resolve the issue.

Through it all, Thomas’ mission was to inspire and nurture growth in individuals so they might reach their potential with integrity, respect, trust and honesty. In addition to personal growth workshops like this for women and at-risk youth, Thomas also provides leadership training, consulting and coaching services to corporations, organizations and other professional groups to encourage leadership development, team building and employee development using horses.

To explore L-E-A-D further for your personal or professional development, contact Sue Thomas at (330) 274-2693 or visit LeadershipEAD.com.

 

pcdl-libraryWindham – Windham Village council met April 24, 2014 for their regular monthly meeting not held on the regular meeting night.

Council approved amendments to the agenda, the minutes, the financial report, and the police and fire report. Two guests had prior authorization to speak at the meeting. The first guest was Cecilia Swanson from the Portage County District Library PCDL. Swanson announced that April 23, 2014 was World Book Night and passed out a copy of Agatha Christy’s After the Funeral. Swanson also inquired about the way the village helps fund the library and requested that they consider going to a percentage rather than a flat rate. After some discussion it was determined they could probably do that but will have to add some language to the contract that would keep the costs from skyrocketing. Cecilia also had one library sign and will purchase another one if the village will install them.

The second guest was Angelo Battaglia Democratic candidate for county commissioner. Battaglia stated that he is a business owner and wants to serve others. His goals are to learn how townships, villages, sheriff’s departments, etc operate and see what the commissioners can do to help them. He claims he doesn’t have all the answers but is willing to dig in to find solutions.

Council then passed Ordinance O-2014-13 amending the current pay ordinance to establish and revise the salaries and wages of all full-time and part-time employees within the Village of Windham. This ordinance repeals all prior inconsistent ordinances and declares  an emergency. The changes are the base salary for the fiscal officer is set at $42,658.56 effective May 1, 2014. They also established and approved $600 a month salary for the zoning inspector.

In other council news, council approved the donation of eight yards of mulch from Doll Lumber, announced support for the Ohio Public Works Commission, and appointed Randy Slusher to the Planning and Zoning Committee. Councilwoman Rachel Barrett asked if the village administrator would get the paperwork filed so Windham could benefit from the community service workers this summer. The mayor said they would look in to it.

The next Windham Council meeting is scheduled May 29, 2014 at 7 pm in council chambers.

Participants of Rotary's Roadside Cleanup. Photo courtesy of Tom Collins

Participants of Rotary’s Roadside Cleanup. Photo courtesy of Tom Collins

Garrettsville - Garrettsville-Hiram  Rotarians met at their new venue at Cal’s II at noon on Monday, April 28, 2014; it was a good meeting, model for many more.

Ted Lysiak reported that the construction of the new intermediate school is—so far—on track to be completed as scheduled, on August 20.  Consultations  with the YMCA are ongoing, regarding which spaces at the Park Ave. building will be used by them and which will be the domain of the PCESC.  Teachers from that building will be packing up their accumulated materials to be moved to the new digs by the high school football team, after storage in some donated semi trailers over the summer.  Whew!  Demo models of the tech component of the grant—Google Chrome book and HP laptop—circulated  and the 4C’s aspect of their acquisition—creativity,  collaboration, communication and critical thinking—were brought out.  He also invited all to the Wednesday, April 30 presentation by the Portage County Drug Task Force at the Iva Walker Auditorium.

Carol Donley reported on the latest developments in the ongoing adventure of the group’s sponsored international exchange student, Rachel Schwan, who will be heading out to Thailand in August.  Carol was able to participate in the district investiture program   when the exchange students got their Rotary blazers (and pins)to identify themselves when they speak to international Rotary groups.   Rachel will also be receiving local club banners and pins to use when making presentations.  So far, no word on an exchange student coming to the Garrettsville-Hiram community.  Also mentioned was the generous impulse of district Rotarians making #GarrettsvilleStrong donations at the conference.

Tom Collins reported on the recent roadside clean-up between Garrettsville and Hiram with the assistance of the Garfield Interact Club and the Boy Scouts AND Jim Irwin and John Crawford.  Interesting things turned up in the highway waste collection.  Lunch, furnished by McDonald’s, was enjoyed by all.  Also from Tom, mention of his visit to the Mantua-Shalersville club meeting to hear a presentation by Portage Park District head, Chris Craycroft, explaining and urging support for the county parks levy which will be up for passage on May 6.  The system could be an economic engine for the county and for the Garrettsville/Mantua area, located at either end of the Headwaters Trail.  Possible co-operation between the clubs to promote the trail is a thought for the future.

Rotarians are everywhere and many of them were in evidence at the “Garrettsville Day” in Blazin’ Bill’s rib celebration recently.  As a business owner who in the past suffered  a fire of total destruction and a Rotarian, the owner/operator graciously turned over a percentage of that evening’s profits to the recovery efforts.  Plenty of locals and plenty of Rotarians from far afield attended to support the cause.  Plans for the Rotary contribution to the rebuilding effort will be taking shape soon.

The club voted to make a contribution to the Garfield after-prom committee.

Rotary Youth Leadership Assembly will be coming up this summer.  Candidates are being sought.

Photo: Iron Eagle Martial Arts

Photo: Iron Eagle Martial Arts

Mantua – Iron Eagle Martial Arts in Mantua Village is now offering Kung Fu classes in addition to their Taekwondo and Reality Self Defense Programs. Come join us for an Open House on Saturday, May 10 from 12-2 pm and meet Sifu Wayne Christopher, instructor, with over 40 years of training and experience in Hung Loy Kung Fu.  Those dedicated to the art of Hung Loy kept it shrouded in mystery for hundreds of years, but with few instructors remaining, Sifu Christopher is determined to bring this art out of the dark and into the light for all to enjoy, and we are proud to support this effort! Learn the philosophy and history behind this fascinating martial art.  Demonstrations will be held throughout the event and refreshments will be served. Come with your questions!  This is a FREE event!

Iron Eagle Martial Arts is located at 10676 Main St. (Route 44), Mantua Village, on the corner of Main St. and Prospect St.

3D Rendering provided by James A. Garfield Local School District

Garrettsville – Last December the James A. Garfield Local School District was awarded a $5 Million State of Ohio Straight A Fund Grant. The funds from this grant have been used to create a “Campus of Excellence” our community can be proud of for generations to come enhancing education for local school children, and expanding opportunities within our community.

As you may have noticed during your travels along State Route 88, construction of the 17,000 square foot addition to the elementary school is under way. This addition will facilitate the consolidation of the James A. Garfield Schools, allowing all 1,500 students to be located on one campus – resulting in over $300,000 in annual operational savings, and increasing the ability to share resources.  A professional development center has also been included in the addition, and will be used as a multi-purpose space for training, and public use.

The grant was not limited solely to physical construction projects, as upgrades to the District’s technology infrastructure are also being made. Students in grades 7-12 will be issued laptop computers, and students in grades K-6 will have increased access to laptop carts.

In an effort to bring even more great resources to Garrettsville and our surrounding communities, partnerships were established to make use of the Park Avenue Building. The Greater Cleveland YMCA will bring before and after school care, as well as management of youth sports. The Portage County Educational Service Center will also make use of classroom space at the building to offer a new public preschool option.

A groundbreaking ceremony at the site of the Elementary School’s new fifth and sixth grade wing is scheduled for May 8th at 6:00 PM. Area residents; parents/guardians and students are invited to attend. The rendering above illustrates what the completed project will look like when students arrive on campus at the start of the 2014/2015 school year.

 


 

Artist’s Renderings

Artist’s rendering of the elementary school  addition as seen from the main entrance (left) and from the driveway (right).

 

garfield-hall-of-fameGarrettsville - A select but cheerful crowd was in attendance at the James A. Garfield Schools Hall of Fame celebration on Saturday, April 26, 2014.  The Middle School Jazz Band and the High School Jazz Band provided preprandial (Look it up; it means “before a meal”) musical selections for everyone’s listening pleasure and a number of high school athletes were on hand to assist with serving and clean-up.  Joe Malmisur ably handled the duties of master of ceremonies.  Sheri Johnson and Annette Carlisle were the organizers of the event.

The all-star line-up included :

Faber (Rusty) Kearney  –  Introduced  by his old friend and classmate (’76) Joe Malmisur, this Garfield grad has made it a point to be all about serving.  After finishing high school— football letter-winner, National Honor Society, Academic Challenge team, the usual—Rusty went   on to serve in the U.S. Navy, gain a degree in nuclear technology, advance in recognition and respect in the nuclear industry(Currently with Excelon Corp.) and volunteer in community organizations(e.g. Big Brothers and Sisters) wherever he and his family have resided.  Applause rose spontaneously when he shared the fact that his kids are currently on active duty in the U.S. military. The appropriate quote might be, “We make a living by what we get but we make a life by what we give.”(Winston Churchill)

Harry Kraft – Honored for his service to the district, Harry recounted some of his best moments in coaching, predominantly in track and field.  He credited much of his success to the fact that he was privileged to be on the scene when a strong and dedicated cohort of young people was present in the system.  His introducer, Matt Pfleger, was one of these; he and his brother, current athletic director, Jim Pfleger, testified to Coach Kraft’s service as a mentor and role model.  Records set and good times were part of the reminiscences, heads nodded  .  The coach acknowledged the part played by a wife who allowed a prolonged engagement with adolescence and adolescents.  As an 80th birthday gift, this was a winner.

Nick Rogers – Having traveled up from Texas, where he is a well-regarded and successful director of recruiting at Medestar in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, proficient in staffing and recruiting skills, Nick   was introduced by his friend and nominator , Jamie Ward, sports writer with the Geauga County Maple Leaf.  This brought forth a whole litany of Nick’s accomplishments  on courts and fields, and the revelation that he had won an additional letter in baseball, playing on the fly, as it were, when the boys on the diamond fell below required numbers.  Nick was an outstanding performer from an early age and a leader always , an example for athletes across the spectrum–boys, girls, older players,  younger teammates.  He was the straw that stirred the brew.  Nick graciously acknowledged the influences on his life, beginning with his parents, who were always supportive, through Coach Bennett and Coach Morgan and other families which were part of his life.

Jeremy Vecchio, the fourth honoree, was unable to attend.

Socializing and tours of the updated, refurbished, renewed and remodeled  high school were also a popular part of the evening.

 

Garrettsville – In honor of National Dance Week, the 8th Count Dance Center participated in the nation-wide dance flash mob and “mobbed” their city. This past Sunday afternoon, the 8th Count Dance Center Dancers and their families learned the routine that all the studios were using for Dance Week. Miss Emily took time to learn the dance and then she taught it to the rest of the group. Following the practice, fifteen folks mobbed Garrettsville by performing the dance routine at Speedway, Save-a-Lot, McDonald’s and the parking lot in front of the movie theatre. The purpose of the event is to celebrate dance and to promote fun and fitness.

The dancers wore fluorescent colored t-shirts with the flash mob logo on it to promote the event. The group hit the streets and stores, surprising folks with their dance.  People stopped in awe and watched as the group performed. It was a day of fun and a great way to celebrate dance.

This is not the first time the dance center has participated in this event. Last year, they did this as well. This is the third year the National Dance Foundation has promoted the flash mob event during dance week.

This year, the 8th Count Dance Center has had a very busy dance season. This past weekend they had several of their competition groups qualify for Nationals which will be held later this summer. Their competition team has continued to be a strong contender at events all year long and hopes their success continues at Nationals.

Speaking of the competition team, they will have open calls for next year’s competition team on June 14, 2014 from 9 am until 11am at the center. Anyone who likes to dance but not interested in competition should check out the summer dance schedule and give it a try before committing to a full season of dance. They also will have a variety of dance camps throughout the summer one might like to try.

For more information on classes or summer camps, one can call the center at 330 527-0358 or visit their website for more specifics at www.the8thcount.com. The dance center is located in the Garfield Plaza at 8015 B State Street Garrettsville, OH.

Nelson Bisard, owner of Waterfall Antiques & Collectibles in Garrettsville
Nelson Bisard, owner of Waterfall Antiques & Collectibles in Garrettsville

Nelson Bisard owner of Waterfall Antiques & Collectibles in Garrettsville. Photo by: Krista Peterson, Staff Photographer

Garrettsville - For over twenty years, husband & wife team Nelson and Judy Bisard have owned and operated one of the area’s premier destinations for antiquities and collectible items. Their multi-dealer shop, Waterfall Antiques & Collectibles, carries a general line of antiques and collectibles, including furniture, accessories, glassware, pottery, jewelry, kitchen items, Victorian smalls, cranberry glass, coins, toys, dolls and so much more.

Located along the Garrettsville boardwalk, Waterfall Antiques and Collectibles is a perfect fit for a community where President James A. Garfield once walked the streets and held meetings in the rooms nearby.

Shoppers are always pleasantly surprised to discover there is so much more to see beyond the main showroom when first entering the 1870’s building. Hidden beyond the first room, treasure seekers find additional nooks and crannies packed with fine furniture, Lee Middleton dolls and smalls. As an added bonus, shoppers who venture to the lower level of the store can explore an exceptionally large basement with exposed rafters and original stone foundation. The basement holds many other pieces of antique furniture and memorabilia. Visitors to the shop also enjoy viewing Eagle Creek and Garrettsville’s scenic waterfall from the deck off the main shop floor.

Located at 8130 Main Street in Garrettsville, Waterfall Antiques and Collectibles is open from 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM Tuesday through Saturday. This weekend take a drive to beautiful Garrettsville, and discover why our historic village is truly a good place to visit and a great place to live.

 

A temporary sign marks the newest location for Maggie’s Donuts -- Hiram Village -- in the space formerly occupied by Harrison’s Hideaway.
A temporary sign marks the newest location for Maggie’s Donuts -- Hiram Village -- in the space formerly occupied by Harrison’s Hideaway.

A temporary sign marks the newest location for Maggie’s Donuts — Hiram Village — in the space formerly occupied by Harrison’s Hideaway.

Hiram – Local donut-lovers are thrilled at the news that the Middlefield-based donut bakery will open a new location in Hiram Village — at the location that formerly housed Harrison’s Hideaway on Wakefield Road.

But what prompted owners Bill and Staci Poole, who have been at the helm of the 55-year-old donut dynasty for 26 years, to choose a location in Hiram? “People have been asking via social media,” remarked Bill Poole. And the good news traveled fast, as Facebook friend Kathryn recently posted, “Hooray…welcome Maggie’s Donuts…looking forward to your arrival!” Ali joked about the locations planned drive-thru window, posting, “Can’t wait to welcome you to Hiram! Great idea on the drive thru, with five kids, we would never make it inside!”

If you choose to step inside, you’ll find donuts and other special treats, made according to the same recipes locals have enjoyed for over 50 years. Donuts are prepared at the Middlefield and Bedford locations early each morning, and delivered fresh, seven days a week. Soon local residents can sit down to enjoy hot coffee and fresh donuts, or take some “to go”, via the drive-thru window, delighting family, friends or coworkers with Maggie’s tasty treats.

Poole went on to explain that he has known Hiram Police Chief Ed Samec from his work in Middlefield, where Samec was Police Chief and Poole served as Mayor for 12 years. Poole continued, “Hiram’s Chief, Ed Samec, knew we were scouting locations. Ed called and recommended that we check out the building in the Village.”

Samec beamed, “I always looked at Bill as a pillar of the community. When he told me in a casual conversation that he was looking to spread out I immediately thought that it would be great for him to be in Hiram. Maggie’s is great for Hiram and Hiram is great for Maggie’s.”

Maggie’s currently has four locations — two in Middlefield, one in Bedford, and one in Madison. The Hiram location will open just as soon as renovations can be completed — Poole estimates opening some time between the middle and end of May, with a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony to occur some time thereafter. Facebook friend Joan marveled, “Congrats to you guys! So glad you have another store to share your absolute BEST donuts ever!” To find out the latest developments, visit Maggie’s Donuts on Facebook.

Garfield-Elementary-Kids-PTO-Rock-Wall

Garrettsville – Gym Teacher Mark Rado and his students expressed their appreciation to the James A. Garfield PTO, which recently donated a rock-climbing wall to the Elementary School for use during gym classes. Spanning the width the gymnasium, this multicolored climbing wall will provide Garfield students fun new opportunities to be physically active while having a great time.

Pictured above are (left to right): Bottom - Lexi Schultz, Sarah Shearer, Gracie Pignaloso, Angela Vanhorn, Chloe Pfile, Madi VanKirk, Maddy Cline Top - Coach Dan Masiello, Scott Vanhorn, Meg Visocan, Angela Masiello, Torrie Gall, Anna Jo Weaver, Emma Lawrence, Shelby Mayes, Coach Tom VanKirk, David Pignaloso Not pictured - Autumn Belviy and Hailey Eckelberry
Pictured above are (left to right): Bottom - Lexi Schultz, Sarah Shearer, Gracie Pignaloso, Angela Vanhorn, Chloe Pfile, Madi VanKirk, Maddy Cline Top - Coach Dan Masiello, Scott Vanhorn, Meg Visocan, Angela Masiello, Torrie Gall, Anna Jo Weaver, Emma Lawrence, Shelby Mayes, Coach Tom VanKirk, David Pignaloso Not pictured - Autumn Belviy and Hailey Eckelberry

Pictured above are (left to right): Bottom – Lexi Schultz, Sarah Shearer, Gracie Pignaloso, Angela Vanhorn, Chloe Pfile, Madi VanKirk, Maddy Cline
Top – Coach Dan Masiello, Scott Vanhorn, Meg Visocan, Angela Masiello, Torrie Gall, Anna Jo Weaver, Emma Lawrence, Shelby Mayes, Coach Tom VanKirk, David Pignaloso
Not pictured – Autumn Belviy and Hailey Eckelberry

Garrettsville - We are proud to announce that Garrettsville Youth Softball and the Ohio Outlaws have put together a team of local 12u and out of town players to raise money for the rebuilding of the businesses lost in the fire in Garrettsville a few weeks ago. We have 7 Garrettsville girls, 4 Crestwood, and 3 out of towner’s joining together for the cause along with local and Outlaw coaches!

There will be a fund raising scrimmage vs Crestwood Heat 14u April 25th @ 6pm at the fields in Shalersville Park on 303 off the 44 exit of the Ohio Turnpike. Feel free to come out and root the girls on. Cash donations or non-perishable food or household items will be accepted at the game. No donation is required to attend.

We will also be taking our “Garrettsville Strong” team to a tournament in Akron May 3-4th. The tournament director has graciously donated a large portion of our tournament fees back to the fund. Each family is donating per player to play in the tournament as well. Our uniform is the fund raising t-shirts offered by the Weekly Villager with the players numbers on the back, so most all donations go directly to the fund.

The Garrettsville business community has always generously supported the softball ladies and we felt we needed to do something to give back for all the years of support!

Special thanks to Warren Wolff, president of the Ohio Outlaws and Adam Acord, head coach of Outlaws Silver 12u for their support in this effort, along with coach Chris of the Crestwood Heat. Several local girls play for the Outlaws and other travel softball organizations and its fitting we could collaborate Recreational and Travel players and just play some softball.

The link listed below provides info on the early bird pre-season tournament in Akron http://www.thesoftballzone.com/vb3/other-tournaments-friendlies-scrimmages/56571-2nd-annual-north-akron-warmup.html

andover-hardware-sign-club-Spring-Gas-Up-ShowWayne Township - The Ashtabula County Antique Engine Club will start off their 33rd year with their annual Spring Gas-Up Show scheduled for Saturday, May, 10th.  The Club was formed 33 years ago and holds several events throughout the summer.  Club members open their beautiful grounds at 4026 St. Rt. 322 in Wayne Township, Ohio, on the 10th for members to display projects completed over the past winter and to bring out other items.  The Agricultural Heritage Museum and the P & LE Passenger Depot Museum both will be open during the Show.  The Club will be serving delicious food so you can come and stay the whole day.  In conjunction with the one day show there will also be a 2 day Flea Market which will be held both Saturday and Sunday.  Hours will be 9 am to 4 pm and there is a small donation asked for admission on Saturday.

The Ashtabula County Antique Engine Club is a non-profit organization dedicated to the purpose of the collection, preservation, restoration, and exhibition of engines, vehicles, machinery, and other items of historical value.  The grounds is home to two railroad depots moved there from the town of Andover several years ago, a 1930 era gas station, an Agricultural Heritage Museum, a general store, and a one room school house along with several other display buildings.  Volunteers have restored several engines, tractors, and other pieces of equipment which will be on display along with items from Club members.  Work has begun on their newest projects which include an addition to the Fairbanks Morse building and the moving of an oil field building and engine from Bullion, PA.

Hope to see everyone at our Spring Gas-Up Show and we hope you will come back and visit us at our really big show scheduled for July 4th through the 6th which is always a very fun filled weekend for ACAEC and for all of Ashtabula County.  Other events scheduled for the Show Grounds are the Lenape Indian Nation’s Native American Indian Powwow which will be held on June 20 through June 22, a Bluegrass Festival on August 15th and 16th, the annual Arts and Crafts Fair sponsored by the Andover United Methodist Church during the Labor Day weekend, the Lakeland Chapter of the AACA’s Antique Car and Truck Show on Sunday, September 14th, and winds up with ACAEC’s annual Fall Show on September 20th. For additional information please visit the Club’s website at www.ashtabulaantiqueengineclub.net.

 

Rally ‘Round the Flag, Boys…and Girls!!!

This is no time to be falling into disputes that could derail the downtown reconstruction efforts before they get truly off of the ground.

#GarrettsvilleStrong has been up front about the purpose of the financial efforts being made from the very beginning.  It’s all about rebuilding, moving on, emerging bigger and better than ever before.  It is not , repeat, NOT, intended to compensate the individual owners and/or tenants of the buildings which were destroyed.  That is a can of worms (see :Megascolides australis) that no one in their right mind would choose to open when things need to move along with all deliberate speed.  Why?

Well, first of all, who and what qualifies?  Owners?  Tenants?  Fully insured? Under-insured?  Value of stock?  Cost of replacement?  Value of the commercial “draw” to the community?  Value of the “ambience”?  Contribution to the community?  When questions like these morph into who likes who better and whose merchandise was cuter, full-scale war fare is likely to break out and the cause of progress takes a back seat, waaaay back.

Second, when is this going to happen?  Empty the coffers right away to ease the immediate pain of disaster?  Hand out dribs and drabs at a time to whoever has the saddest story (Fierce competition here)?  Wait until it’s all rebuilt and help cover the cost of the grand opening?  Put it on the village Christmas wish list?

AND…how much? Offer a percentage of the insurance coverage?  Equal amounts to everyone? More for property owners?  More for business owners? Base the payment on the previous year’s tax duplicate as representative of the business’s contribution to the local economy?

Folks, this way lies madness…not to mention a tidal wave of frustration and hard feelings that would do no one any good and probably negate much of the good will and community feeling that has been evident in the widespread reaction to the event itself and in the way we all carry on as a community.  #GarrettsvilleStrong!

If individuals would like to make contribution to the folks, bless their hearts, who lost everything and are   only now beginning to emerge from the shock of the actual event to the shock of contemplating what the REAL losses were and what could be involved in coming back, make your directed contributions to the Garrettsville People Tree.  Community is the focus there and the burned-out ones are part of our community.

#GarrettsvilleStrong  is about REbuilding.  It’s about the nuts and bolts, the nitty and gritty, the down and dirty details of what has to come back : parking, fence removal, sidewalks, streetscape, utilities replacement & relocation (underground  electrical service would be nice), landscaping, design proposals, architectural features, specific donations and dedications (civic groups and individuals), plenty of things we don’t always think about, but have to BE thought about.  And, of course, what’s going to  come back in that space?

Here’s where we can all make a contribution.  Have you been thinking about having a small business of your own?  Might it be a ”niche” business that could draw customers from a wide area for your specific expertise? (Bless you,  Shaker Tree.  Bless you, Clock Man  Bless you, T&B Tools)  Do you know someone who fits this description?  Have you a hobby or collection that could form the basis of a business downtown?  Get thinking, out there!  We DO NOT need another  place to buy pizza, but a pastry shop might make it, especially if folks could watch the chef make gorgeous  icing roses or fabulous brownies or ice cream.  Think something connected with the Headwaters Trail.  Think about it.  Think Chagrin Falls.  Think Hudson.  Think Garrettsville into the future.

The place has been a commercial hub since its founding in 1804.  John Garrett had the foresight to not only bring a mill to serve the local farming community, but to bring a blacksmith, one Abraham Dyson, the equivalent of Lowe’s and Home Depot rolled into one, at the time he came over the mountains from Delaware.  The maple syrup business was huge at one time, over 50,000 gal a year by one account.  The Root Store (Chic & Shabby building) was the county’s first “department store” in 1850.  The village had the first paved main street in Portage County (The mud had got pretty deep in the rainy season—bad for business).   This is a village that can think big.  Think about it.

#GarrettsvilleStrong!

 

youth-soccer-auburn-townshipAuburn Twp. – If your child could use an intensive week of soccer skills training in a friendly, professional atmosphere, with the added bonus of daily Team Talks for instruction in life-enriching Biblical principles, they will love Ambassadors Soccer Camp 9am-3pm, July 22-26 (Tuesday-Saturday) at Friendship Alliance Church in Auburn Township.

Ambassadors Soccer Camps are designed to give developing players (ages 6-14) the opportunity to learn basic and advanced skills in a positive, encouraging environment. Both technical and tactical instruction is given at individual and group levels, focusing on control, passing, heading, dribbling, shooting and defending.

Small-sided games and age-related competitions round out the daily program. The week concludes with individual skill competitions and the highly-anticipated ‘World Cup’ tournament and family picnic.

The coaching staff is comprised of experienced players and coaches — some local and others who play soccer for their countries. International coaches typically represent Holland, Brazil, Indonesia, South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, and/or Northern Ireland.

Online registration is available at www.ambassadorssoccercamps.com. The fee through May 31 is $130; $155 thereafter. Each camper receives an Ambassadors soccer ball, T-shirt, certificate of completion, workbook, plus special awards and prizes.

The headquarters for Ambassadors Football is located in Twinsburg. It can be contacted at (330) 963-6599.

Friendship Alliance Church has been hosting Ambassadors Soccer Camp for 15 years and has become a summertime favorite for hundreds of area youth. The church is located at 19126 Ravenna Road (State Route 44), 2.5 miles north of State Route 82 and 2.5 miles south of State Route 422. The church can be reached at (440) 834-0955 or at admin@FAC-OH.org.

 

Pictured left to right: Diane Jendrisak, Co-President of the Portage County Gardeners, and Chair of the May Mart/Plant Sale& Nancy Polz, chair of Pre-Sale. They are getting ready for the upcoming events at the garden center at 5154 S. Prospect St. Ravenna
Pictured left to right: Diane Jendrisak, Co-President of the Portage County Gardeners, and Chair of the May Mart/Plant Sale& Nancy Polz, chair of Pre-Sale. They are getting ready for the upcoming events at the garden center at  5154 S. Prospect St. Ravenna

Pictured left to right: Diane Jendrisak, Co-President of the Portage County Gardeners, and Chair of the May Mart/Plant Sale& Nancy Polz, chair of Pre-Sale. They are getting ready for the upcoming events at the garden center at 5154 S. Prospect St. Ravenna

Ravenna – The Portage County Gardeners are hosting several upcoming events at the garden center in Rootstown.  The address for the center is 5154 S. Prospect St. Ravenna, Oh 44266

The first event is a Mother’s Day sale on Sat. May 10 from 9a.m.- 2p.m. There will be hanging baskets and patio pots for sale at various prices for the Mother’s Day Sale.  Then on Fri. eve May 16 – 4-7p.m and on Sat. May 17- 9-2 p.m. there will be a May Mart/ Plant Sale which includes home-dug perennials, area nursery  stock of annuals, baskets, patio pots, vegetables, herbs, raffles, lunch, a display of the winning posters from the Soil and Water Conservation Contest, a display by the Master Gardeners’, a PCGC membership display, and a bake sale. Thirdly, a Canning Workshop will be offered at the garden center on Sat. June 14, from 10- noon. The cost for this workshop is $25.00 .  Those interested in the Canning Workshop need to contact Helena Parry at 330-673-0577 for a reservations and pre-pay.

Finally, on June 17 the center will host Noelle Clark from Petitti’s Garden Center for a program called ” The Junkyard Up-Cycled Garden.”  Mark your calendars for the plant sales, the canning workshop and program.  You will be delighted.

 

Photo: nickshamhart.com

Photo: nickshamhart.com

Ravenna – Nick Shamhart will be speaking at Reed Memorial Library on Sunday, April 27 at 2 p.m. as the final program of the library’s Local Authors Series.

Nick Shamhart’s writing ranges from romantic comedy to thriller. He is the author of the theologically- and psychologically-driven series based on the afterlife called the Balance Books, and the romantic comedy, The Knight’s Wife. Nick’s latest work, The Fog Within, is his best-selling and highly acclaimed dramatic look into the mind of a severely autistic woman.

Nick Shamhart lives in Cleveland with his wife and two daughters. For more detailed information visit his website, www.nickshamhart.com.

All programs in the Local Authors Series are free and do not require registration. For more information visit Reed Memorial Library at 167 East Main Street, Ravenna, or call (330) 296-2827 (ext. 200).

Pictured, left to right: Cass Owens, Library Director, Reed Memorial Library; Cecilia Swanson, Library Director, Portage County District Library; Rep. Kathleen Clyde- 75th District; Corrine Alldridge, Assistant Library Director, Portage County District Library; Stacey Richardson, Library Director, Kent Free Library.
Pictured, left to right: Cass Owens, Library Director, Reed Memorial Library; Cecilia Swanson, Library Director, Portage County District Library; Rep. Kathleen Clyde- 75th District; Corrine Alldridge, Assistant Library Director, Portage County District Library; Stacey Richardson, Library Director, Kent Free Library.

Pictured, left to right: Cass Owens, Library Director, Reed Memorial Library; Cecilia Swanson, Library Director, Portage County District Library; Rep. Kathleen Clyde- 75th District; Corrine Alldridge, Assistant Library Director, Portage County District Library; Stacey Richardson, Library Director, Kent Free Library.

Columbus – Portage County District Library, along with Reed Memorial Library and Kent Free Library, attended Legislative Day on Wednesday, April 2 in Columbus. Each year, the libraries attend Legislative Day to meet with legislators to ask for their continued support. This year was especially important since libraries are asking that the General Assembly increase the Public Library Fund (PLF) formula percentage from 1.66% to 2.0% of the state’s General Revenue Fund (GRF) tax revenue to help libraries recover from the 2014 PLF 4% cut as well as additional proposed tax cuts. In the fiscal year 2012-2013, the Biennium Budget reduced the PLF percentage from 2.2% to 1.66%. The PLF currently provides public libraries the same amount of state funding as provided in 1996. This is the only state revenue public libraries receive. In addition, the Portage County District Library currently receives no additional local support.

 

Fifty folks “Got Their Groove On” Saturday at the Zumba-a-Thon held at the high school with Heather Kovac. Photo: Denise Bly

Garrettsville – It has been  30 days since the historic Buckeye Block of Garrettsville was engulfed in flames and reduced to a pile of rubble. The tragic event birthed #GarrettsvilleStrong which is raising funds to ensure the historic block is rebuilt.  Weekly, there have been various groups that have registered and are holding events to raise money to rebuild the town. This weekend was no different. One could feast on all the pancakes they could eat at the elementary school and then walk over to the high school and work them off at the Zumba-a-Thon.

The James A. Garfield High School Student Council, along with the Interact Club, middle school student council and two advisors Mrs. Frances Bell and Ms. Missy Petrie were up at the crack of dawn Saturday to get ready for their pancake and sausage breakfast at the elementary school to raise funds for #Garrettsvillestrong. Students waited on customers, while Superintendent Ted Lysiak, Principals Jennifer Mulhern, Michael Dobran and Don Long manned the griddles. They not only had great pancakes and sausage, but these were topped with local maple syrup donated by local producer and maple marvel, Mark Apple. It was delicious and a great way to start off a Saturday. The event raised $1,410 for the #GarrettsvilleStrong Fund.

After having your fill of pancakes, it was time to get one’s groove on at the high school with Heather Kovac, who was holding a Zumba- a-Thon for #GarrettsvilleStrong. For an hour and a half, one could shake ‘em down  with Heather and work off the pancake breakfast while helping out their community. Fifty- plus folks took advantage of keeping their hearts strong while raising funds for #GarrettsvilleStrong. Each participant paid $10 to participate in the event.

The Zumba-a-Thon also had a gift basket raffle.  Between the gift basket and the Zumba, they raised $800 for the #GarrettsvilleStrong Fund.

 

garfield-campus-of-excellence-garrettsville-constructionGarrettsville – The Straight A Grant from the state provided the James A. Garfield Schools with some exceptional opportunities.  With these exceptional opportunities came exceptional challenges.  The district remains on a very tight timeline required by the grant.  All funds must be committed by June 30, 2014 and spent by September 30, 2014. Those funds not spent must be returned, and the district does not plan to return any of the money. This does present some unique challenges, especially for a construction project.  Regardless of these obstacles, the addition is on schedule to open for school this fall.  Here are the latest developments on each component of the grant.

Construction

Hammond Construction, from Canton, was awarded the Design/Build contract for construction of the 17,000 square foot addition.  Their crews have assembled on site and broke ground last Monday. Parent drop off and pick up traffic will be impacted for the remainder of the school year. We appreciate everyone’s patience as we navigate around the construction site.

The addition will include 8 classrooms, 2 state of the art science labs, 2 special education classrooms and a professional development center.  The professional development space will be able to comfortably seat 120 adults and contain digital projection equipment for presentations or trainings. While this space will offer a flexible instructional space for students, the district also wants to make this space available to the public for meetings.

An official groundbreaking ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 8 at 6:00 pm and is open to the public.

Technology

Laptops for students and staff have arrived and are currently being configured. In May all teachers will receive a district-issued laptop, and in August each student in grades 7-12 will be issued a Chromebook. To support the additional 750 devices, grant funds were recently used to install a substantial upgrade to the wireless network district-wide.

Partnerships

The Portage County Educational Service Center (ESC) and the Greater Cleveland YMCA are moving forward with their plans to bring their services to the community. The YMCA has brought youth soccer back to our community and already has over sixty students signed up to participate.  The ESC will soon be finalizing their space at the Intermediate School to determine how many students they can accept for public preschool this fall.

With the construction project, technology initiative and new partnerships developing as planned and on schedule, there is much to celebrate in our community. While there is a great chance to join in the celebration and excitement by attending the May 8th groundbreaking there are many other opportunities to celebrate. The spring sports season is in full-swing and provides many chances to see our students excel outside the classroom.  Schedules can be found on the district website located at http://garfield.sparcc.org.

garfield-campus-of-excellence-garrettsville-construction1

 

Chardon - A sure sign that spring is around the corner is the Geauga County Maple Festival.  It is a celebration of the year’s maple season and the place where maple syrup producers showcase their best syrup.  The festival will take place April 24 – 27 on Historic Chardon Square.

One of the highlights of the festival is the two huge parades.  They step off at 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.  The theme this year is “Spring’s Golden Sunshine – Maple!” There will be floats, horses, old cars, new cars and lots of fire trucks.

The Saturday Parade Marshall will be Aggie Sojka of Hambden.  Sojka has been involved with maple her entire life but now she has proved that the best maple syrup in the world comes from Geauga County.  Her medium amber maple syrup produced in Parkman was awarded a first place at the International Maple Syrup Institute annual meeting in October in Delta Beausejour, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Sojka was inducted into the Geauga County Maple Festival Hall of Fame in 2011.  Her late husband, Mark Sperry, was inducted in 1995.

Sunday’s Parade Marshall will be WOIO weatherman Jeff Tanchak.  As a native of Buffalo, New York, Tanchak understood lake effect weather and the impact it has on an area.  In his spare time he enjoys golf and the Indians.

Also riding in the parade will be the 2014 Maple Hall of Fame inductee Tom Blair of Burton.

This will be the 86th edition of the Geauga County Maple Festival.  The Festival began in 1926 by a group of Chardon businessmen to increase awareness of the areas maple syrup and increase maple sales.  In the late 1940’s there were three years that no festival was held due to the war and lack of maple syrup.  Come join the fun and celebrate “Springs Golden Sunshine – Maple” and the wonderful maple season.  For a complete list of festival events and times visit www.maplefestival.com.

Photo: Benjamin Coll

Photo: Benjamin Coll

Hiram  – Retiring Hiram College President Tom Chema will deliver  the institution’s 164th Commencement address at graduation ceremonies planned for Saturday, May 17.  A total of 299 graduates will be awarded degrees.

Chema has served as president for 11 years. During his presidency, undergraduate enrollment has grown by more than 40%; the Hiram campus has been transformed, with more than $50 million in physical enhancements, including 11 new or renovated buildings; fundraising attainment has grown dramatically with more than 100 gifts to Hiram of more than $100,000; and distinctive academic programs have been developed and implemented, including eight Centers of Distinction.

Hiram’s 21st president, Chema is looking forward to the opportunity to address this year’s graduates.

“I am very much like many of our students,” he said. “I was the first in my family to attend college and the experience transformed my life. Because of my liberal arts education, I was able to reinvent myself many times and have a number of successful careers. Students graduating in 2014 will not only have many different jobs in their lifetime, they will have many different careers. Hiram has prepared them to live and work in a rapidly changing and complex world. Our graduates leave Hiram with an opportunity to make a difference in a world that needs difference makers.”

Chema was no stranger to Hiram when he became president, having served as a voting member of the Hiram College Board of Trustees for 11 years and chairing the Institutional Advancement Committee. He brought to the Hiram presidency more than 30 years of experience in business, government, and law.

A native of East Liverpool, Ohio, Chema was a 1968 graduate of the University of Notre Dame and a 1971 Cum Laude graduate of Harvard Law School. He began his career with the Cleveland-based law firm of Arter & Hadden in 1971 and became a partner in 1979. He took a leave of absence in 1983 to serve as Executive Director of the Ohio Lottery Commission. In 1985, he was asked to become Chairman of the Ohio Public Utilities Commission.

In 1990, he was appointed Executive Director of the Gateway Economic Development  Corporation and was responsible for overseeing the public/private partnership that led to the financing and construction of Jacobs Field and Gund Arena in Cleveland.

Commencement exercises will be held at 2 p.m. at the Charles A. Henry field.

Pinwheels for prevention are on display on the lawn of the Hiram Municipal Building to promote child abuse awareness. The program is sponsored by the Portage County Children’s Advocacy Group.
Pinwheels for prevention are on display on the lawn of the Hiram Municipal Building to promote child abuse awareness. The program is sponsored by the Portage County Children’s Advocacy Group.

Pinwheels for prevention are on display on the lawn of the Hiram Municipal Building to promote child abuse awareness. The program is sponsored by the Portage County Children’s Advocacy Group.

Hiram - According to statistics posted on the Portage County Children’s Advocacy Center’s website, one in four girls and one in six boys will be sexually abused by the age of 18. For 90% of those children, a known and trusted adult often inflicts the abuse. Armed only with gutter spikes (to make planting pinwheels easier), and determination to share their important message, volunteers planted 700 pinwheels in Hiram on Monday to raise awareness and promote reporting of child abuse and neglect. The program, sponsored by the Portage County Children’s Advocacy Center, has been staging similar, colorful displays at a dozen locations around Portage County throughout the month of April as a part of Child Abuse Awareness month.

The pink and blue pinwheels began spinning in front of Robinson Memorial Hospital, the site of the Portage County Children’s Advocacy Center. As the month progressed, the pinwheels were moved to other locations, including the Portage County Courthouse, Streetsboro Town Square, Aurora Police Department, and schools in Rootstown, Kent & Ravenna. The Children’s Advocacy Group is charged with improving the community’s response to child abuse and neglect and to lessen the negative impact of abuse on children. This year, Bikers Against Child Abuse (BACA) joined the effort in front of the Hiram Village Police Department, having participated in similar events in Trumbull, Mahoning, and Ashtabula Counties.

BACA, an international non-profit organization, is on a mission to create a safer environment for abused children. All members refer to each other by “road names” like the group’s Chapter President and Vice President Jammer and Hollywood. According to local BACA member Mama Bear, either children’s service agencies or a child’s legal guardian makes the group aware of children who may need their assistance. The group then meets with the child, bringing them a BACA vest for protection and special teddy bear that is filled with hugs, according to Mama Bear. “We want to remove the stigma they feel — and let them know that they aren’t alone.” BACA members befriend the child during this trying time, and often sit in court with children, empowering them to face their perpetrators.

Mama Bear was made aware of BACA when her son was offered their assistance after being violated at the age of four. She shares, “When that happens to a child, they begin to feel like a freak of nature. But when BACA kids get together, they’re all the same – the stigma is removed. It’s very empowering.” She’s been a proud member of BACA for nine years. Her son, who is seventeen, plans to join as soon as he’s eighteen.

According to Judy Paydock, from the Child Advocacy Center at Robinson, exact numbers of affected children in Portage County are hard to calculate. “We serve many counties through our Center and the Children’s Advocacy Center at Akron Hospital. We receive many calls, but not all calls result in cases.” It’s important to remember, when a child asks for help, listen to them. Believe the child, and tell the child it is not his or her fault. Don’t question the child yourself – this may further traumatize them.  If you’re aware of a child who may need help, contact the Children’s Advocacy Center’s 24 hr. hotline at (330) 296-CARE (2273). For more information on Bikers Against Child Abuse, email bacasniper@gmail.com.

Photo: Hattie Larlham Facebook Page

Photo: Hattie Larlham Facebook Page

Garrettsville - Tee off with Hattie Larlham on May 21, 2014 for the 28th Annual Sugar Bush Golf Classic. Please join us out on the green at the Sugar Bush Golf Club in Garrettsville for a fun and relaxing day of golf, contests and prizes with the ultimate goal of raising funds for Hattie Larlham. Since 1986, the annual Sugar Bush Golf Classic has raised more than $630,000 through generous contributions.

There are many ways to participate in the event, including single and team registrations. This shotgun-style tournament features morning and afternoon tee times. Prizes will be handed out to top golfers in each  session for both men and women. Celebrity golfers and special guests will be present during both event sessions. This event sells out annually. Please register as early as possible to secure the tee time of choice.

Golfer’s Player Packages will be available to purchase for $25. Packages include two mulligans, two celebrity shots, two chances to hit the circle on a par 3, participation in the “guess your drive” and putting contests.

The Fraternal Order of Eagles #2436 will be sponsoring a raffle on the day of the event. The first prize winner will receive a cash prize of $1,500. The second prize winner will be treated to a Golf Package for 4 at the Barrington Golf Club.

In addition to the Golfer’s Player Packages and the Fraternal Order of Eagles #2436 raffle, the 28th Sugar Bush Golf Classic will hold various on-course contests, a “Skins Game” and 50/50 raffle. The 50/50 raffle prizes include rounds of golf and golf accessories.

With so many ways to participate, win and raise money for Hattie Larlham the 28th Sugar Bush Golf Classic is sure to be an exciting event for everyone. Be sure to register early to secure your spot for this amazing event.

If you are interested in participating in the 28th Annual Sugar Bush Golf Classic please download a registration form from our website www.hattielarlham.org, complete it and return by May 7th, 2014. Be sure to register early to secure your preferred time for this great event.

 

Registration forms may be returned by:

Mail:

Hattie Larlham

ATTN: Candrice Dalton

37996 Darrow Road, Suite #10

Twinsburg, Ohio 44087

Email: candrice.dalton@hattielarlham.org

Fax: 330.732.248

 

Garrettsville – This past Sunday, over 70 contestants competed in a closed audition, hoping to keep their dreams alive of becoming the next Garrettsville Idol. This was one of the largest competitions they have had in recent years and the judges, Danny Deakins, Wendi Brown and Jackie Rinearson were given the difficult task of selecting those who would move on to the semifinals. After some lengthy deliberations, 51 contestants’ dreams of being named the next Garrettsville Idol were still alive.

There will be two incredible shows for the semifinals on May 18th. The first show will start at 4pm and will feature the youth and teens, while the second show will start at 6 pm and will feature the adult contestants. Each contestant will perform an entire song with music accompaniment before a live audience at James A. Garfield High School’s Iva Walker Auditorium. The winners of the semifinals will advance to the finals held Sunday June 29th during Summerfest.

Advancing to the semifinals in the adult division (top photo) are Sara Apthorpe, Aimee Beelen, Bryan Bier, Tiffany Bolton, Christy Brown, Raelyn DeBevits, Tammy Doumanian, Stephanie Ewell, Ryan Hecky, Jeremy Keeney, Rachael Maddox, Russ Martin, Devin Maze, Josh Owens, Linda Perrault, Sarah Jane Ralston, Jackson Ramsey, Kristina Rossi, Ambur Scales, Selina Slaughter, and Jason Stachowski.

Advancing to the semifinals in the adult division are Sara Apthorpe, Aimee Beelen, Bryan Bier, Tiffany Bolton, Christy Brown, Raelyn DeBevits, Tammy Doumanian, Stephanie Ewell, Ryan Hecky, Jeremy Keeney, Rachael Maddox, Russ Martin, Devin Maze, Josh Owens, Linda Perrault, Sarah Jane Ralston, Jackson Ramsey, Kristina Rossi, Ambur Scales, Selina Slaughter, and Jason Stachowski.

 

Moving on in the teen division (center photo) are Molli Betters, Elisha Bly, Anna Brown, Taylor Brown, Emilie Clites, Corin Colton, Hannah Cottrell, Lexy Dall,  Jay Davenport, Jainequa Davis, Megan Duderstadt, Caitlyn Hallden, Kaylee Martin, Kaylee Maynard, Jasmine Nevaraz, Rachael Pelter, Mariela Ruschak, Kirsten Sellers, Hannah Simpson, Julie Simpson, Taylor Shuman, Kyle Stern, Haylee Tasker, Cody Tetting, and Kiley Weis.

Moving on in the teen division are Molli Betters, Elisha Bly, Anna Brown, Taylor Brown, Emilie Clites, Corin Colton, Hannah Cottrell, Lexy Dall, Jay Davenport, Jainequa Davis, Megan Duderstadt, Caitlyn Hallden, Kaylee Martin, Kaylee Maynard, Jasmine Nevaraz, Rachael Pelter, Mariela Ruschak, Kirsten Sellers, Hannah Simpson, Julie Simpson, Taylor Shuman, Kyle Stern, Haylee Tasker, Cody Tetting, and Kiley Weis.

Youth singers are Lillian Anderson, Alee Blohm, Makenzie Fink, Maria Roderick and Olivia Sheer.

Youth singers are Lillian Anderson, Alee Blohm, Makenzie Fink, Maria Roderick and Olivia Sheer.

Tickets for the semifinals are $3 for each show and are available at Sky Lanes Bowling Alley.  You can also reserve tickets and pick them up at the auditorium on the day of the performance by calling Aaron King at 330 524-2646.

 

Garrettsville Summerfest is traditionally held on the fourth full weekend of June at the intersection of State Routes 88 and 82 in downtown historic Garrettsville. For more information on the event visit the website, www.garrettsvillesummerfest.com 

 

Garrettsville Idol is brought to you by  The Middlefield Banking Company

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Garrettsville - A full complement of Pastors and Elders from houses of worship across the Garrettsville area, came together with members of the public on Friday, April 11 to join in seeking guidance and help in the renewal, rebuilding and restoration of the business district and the community affected by the March 22 fire in downtown Garrettsville.  The Prophet Jeremiah and the Prophet Ezekial were called upon, the story of Shadrach, Maschek and Abednego in Nebuchadnezzar’s fiery furnace was recounted and a repetition of the psalmist’s request to “revive us again” was offered.  Memories, dreams , prayers and emotions, embodied by Michael Mascheck, were all part of the  gathering, which closed with all joining Gail Mangieri in singing “Great Is Thy Faithfulness.”  It was moving.

Garrettsville is on the move.

#Garrettsville Strong

Lyndhurst – Last year the Manolio family, who had been creating the mosaic art pieces from real egg shells in their front yard for 55 years, announced it would be the last year they would do it. The unexpected death of Ron Manolio, in the fall of 2012, made the 2013 display a tribute to the creator Ron Manolio, make the end of an era; at least it was for the Manolio family. 

Mantua - Through a special program offered at Crestwood Intermediate School, students and their families have the opportunity to experience guided adventures in nearby natural areas. The goal of the program, called Nature Treks, is to share the natural world with families who don’t have the opportunity to experience it regularly. Each trek is led by Crestwood Intermediate teacher Mrs. Rosemary Krupar, and often includes student-teacher participants from nearby Hiram College. Through this program, children and their parents or grandparents visit some the area’s hidden treasures. And the discoveries they make are priceless.

Garrettsville – The James A. Garfield Sports Boosters held the first ever “Love the Dress” prom dress sale at the high school on Sunday April 6, 2014. The sports boosters were able to collect new and nearly new dresses and then resold them at a fraction of the price they originally sold for, making prom more affordable for many. All the dresses were in a variety of colors and sizes with prices starting at $5 but were no higher than $50.