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Chris Gerez

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Garrettsville – Council met July 9, 2014 for their regularly scheduled village council meeting.  A public hearing was held prior to the start of regular business for proposed Ordinance 2014-25, the Village of Garrettsville proposed tax budget for 2015.  No residents were present and no comments were made.

Minutes from last month’s meeting were approved and council reviewed revenue, expenditure, cash balance and income tax reports.  Comments were made about expenditures exceeding revenue on the monthly report and Councilman Hadzinsky commented that historically June is a low revenue month.  Village clerk Nancy Baldwin reminded council that the biggest reason expenditure has been high the past few months is because of the curbing and sidewalk projects that have been completed.  (Baldwin went on to say after the council meeting that most projects for the village are completed in the summer months, which consequently mean higher expenditures.  However that doesn’t mean the village is operating in the red, quite the contrary.  According to Baldwin, the village finances are solid.)

Council went on to approve Ordinance 2014-25 setting the 2015 village tax budget, Ordinance 2014-27 that renews a 20 year lease with East Ohio Gas Company for a box near the police station, and Ordinance 2014-28 which has to do with employee compensation changes and to make them coincide with existing pay periods.

During round table discussion, Council President, Tom Hardesty, updated everyone on the status of the puddling issues with the completion of the Windham street paving project.  The state will make sure the problems are corrected.  Hardesty also stated that the village’s next improvement project is to construct curbing on the east side of South Street from the top of the hill to the library entrance.  He is waiting on estimates, but the cost should not exceed the budgeted amount.  Council passed a motion to proceed with the project.

Councilwoman Anderson proposed  that council consider an annual ‘contest’ for property owners in the village for ‘most/best improved property’ as well as ‘best landscaping’.  Her suggestion included possibly asking the garden club to assist with choosing criteria and winners.  Council unanimously thought it a good idea and asked Anderson to pursue the idea.

Next the mayor informed council he had a schedule conflict for the scheduled August council meeting as asked them to consider changing the date and time.  After some discussion, it was determined that it would be difficult to get all council members to attend for the alternate meeting dates proposed and no decision was made on rescheduling.

Councilwoman Harrington brought up the survey that the Village Services Visionary Group has put together.  The plan is to have the surveys available at the post office, library and village clerk’s office sometime toward the end of July.

At the close of roundtable discussion, the mayor asked for input or comments from the audience.  Village tax clerk Valerie McCullough brought up the subject of delinquent taxpayers in the village and her frustration in getting them to pay their taxes.  She asked for suggestions in how to better deal with some of the problems she encounters.  McCullough stated that there are currently 101 people on delinquent tax repayment plans accounting for approximately $156,000 in uncollected revenue over the past five tax years.  Once the repayment plan has been agreed to, all penalties and interest are stopped and repayment is based on the principal owed.  Penalties and interest are currently not reinstated for those that have defaulted on a repayment plan.  McCullough says she plans to investigate the legality of reinstating the monetary penalties for those that default on repayment as well as the functionality of the income tax software the village uses in addressing these issues.

McCullough’s biggest frustration is with those who agree to a repayment plan (with or without court action) and then quit paying only a few payments in.   Solicitor Michelle Stuck stated she would be glad to write letters reminding the offenders of their obligation and that she would pursue legal action through the criminal court system.  Stuck also said that for those defaulting on repayment plans who have already been to court, she would take them back to court and seek a conviction.    McCullough also said that there are another 55 residents who have not filed for 2013 owing approximately $56,000.

At the end of the discussion, Council adjourned to executive session to discuss personnel issues.

If you’d like to know more of what is happening in your community attend a meeting.  The next regular Village Council meeting is currently scheduled for August 13, 2014 at 7:30 p.m. at Village Hall.

 

Garrettsville -  Council met June 11, 2014 for their regularly scheduled village council meeting.  The addenda and the meeting were both brief.

After approving the minutes from last months meeting council reviewed revenue, expenditure, cash balance and income tax reports.  Comments from members of council indicated they were pleased to see income tax numbers were increased.  Councilman Hadzinsky also commented that the village was “in the black” and trends looked optimistic.

In other business after a short discussion council decided to leave proposed ordinance 2014-14 (about compensatory time) tabled.  They also authorized the village clerk to pay overages on the bill for concrete that was poured on Windham St. due to fuel increases and to pay the invoice from the Portage County Development Board who is responsible for the administration of the village’s tax abatement program in Garrettsville’s enterprise zones.

During round table discussion, Mayor Patrick gave an update on the Liberty Street bridge project.  He said he was told that it should be opened to traffic by the end of the month, just in time for Summerfest.  He also stated that the village’s streets supervisor would be contacting Nelson Township trustees to co-ordinate the chip/seal scheduled to begin in July for Brosius Rd.

The mayor also gave an update from the last Planning Commission meeting.  He said builder Mike Maschek showed his plans for the recently purchased feed mill at the east end of Main St.  Demolition has already begun and should be completed by Summerfest.  He also reported that the Pizza Hut construction has started and block is already being laid.  The Mayor announced that Jeff Shehan was sworn in as a member of Planning Commission, he replaces Don Harvey.

Councilwoman Harrington gave a brief update on the Village Services Vision Committee.  She stated that they are revamping the survey questions that were used at last year’s business showcase and will be asking residents to fill out a new survey.  They plan is to have the surveys available for next month’s council meeting to get approval and then distribute them out to the community.  The survey will also be available on the Village’s website: http://www.garrettsville.org.

Council adjourned to executive session to discuss personnel.

If you’d like to know more of what is happening in your community attend a meeting.  The next regular Village Council meeting is scheduled for July 9, 2014 at 7:30 p.m. at Village Hall.

 

Last Wednesday, at the rescheduled May 21st village council meeting, council approved Ordinance 2014-13.  The new ordinance will increase water rates 7% on July 1, 2014, another 7% on January 1, 2015 and another 7% on January 1, 2016.  The Ordinance then allows for a 2% annual increase beginning January 2017.  These increases are for water rates only and will not affect sewer rates.  The increase in rates will help build cash reserves that are needed for replacement projects and any emergency repairs.  There are still some sections of 100+ year-old pipes awaiting replacement.

Council did say at the previous month’s meeting that they do have the authority to suspend a scheduled future  increase and said they will if sufficient funds are in reserve for capital improvements and repairs.

Mayor Patrick announced that the Portage County Commissioners awarded a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) to the village.  Funds from the grant will be distributed in 2015 and will provide for streetscape improvements on Main Street that include new 14-foot wide sidewalks and new lighting.  The CDBG grant requires no matching funds from the village.  The village applied for the grant as part of an effort to rebuild Main Street after the devastating fire on March 22 that destroyed one quarter of downtown Main Street buildings.  The grant has nothing to do with the GARRETTSVILLESTRONG efforts for rebuilding organized by the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce.

In other business, council tabled Ordinance 2014-14, an Ordinance pertaining to compensatory time, and approved the following: Ordinance 2014-21, pertaining to compensation for the village solicitor when acting as the zoning inspector, Ordinance 2014-22 allowing the mayor and village clerk to sign plats for recording  the Fox Hollow subdivision, and Resolution 2014-23 authorizing a temporary change in employment status for the head dispatcher while she attends the Police Academy.  Council also approved a motion to allow the mayor to accept repaving bids for Brosius Rd.

Mayor Patrick announced that it is a “done deal” and Pizza Hut will be starting construction soon for their new store in the west end of Garfield Plaza.

If you’d like to know more of what is happening in your community attend a meeting.  The next regular Village Council meeting is scheduled for June 11, 2014 at 7:30 p.m. at Village Hall.

 

The early twentieth century was the golden age for the modern barbershop. During this golden age, many barbershops were classy places. Often barber chairs were ornately carved from oak and walnut and upholstered with fine leather. Marble counters tops held beautifully colored glass tonic bottles and ingrained in the wood and leather in the shop was the smell of pipe and tobacco smoke, hair tonics, pomades and oils.

"Barber Jim" Reppy finishes up a customer's haircut at his temporary location on Highland Ave in Garrettsville. Photo: Benjamin Coll, Staff Reporter

“Barber Jim” Reppy finishes up a customer’s haircut at his temporary location on Highland Ave in Garrettsville.
Photo: Benjamin Coll, Staff Reporter

The warm and welcoming familiarity became a place where men came to relax and socialize. Going to the barbershop was a weekly and sometimes even daily habit. It was a place for men to fraternize with friends and ‘chew the fat’. Today, the modern barbershop is still a place for male camaraderie and conversation.

Jim Reppy, owner and operator of The Barber of G’ville, states that his customers are what he loves most about his job. Jim became a barber after being laid-off from his job at General Motors in the late 1970’s. He worked for his father-in-law, and then bought the business from him in 1990.

Jim says that he used to think that his father-in-law was the smartest man in the world. “He knew something about everything.” Jim said. But soon after coming to work at the barbershop he realized where all that knowledge came from. “It’s amazing what you learn, you meet everyone from garbage truck drivers to college professors. They all like to talk.”

Though today’s barbers no longer carry out tooth extraction or bloodletting practices they still provide an important service. Not only in the cutting of hair but in providing what may truly be one of the last civic forums, where people can gather freely to talk with others in the community. And the barber pole, which once symbolized a place for hair cuts, shaves, surgery & dentistry now stands for a comfortable place to relax, get a hair cut, and join in the banter.

The Barber of G’ville is located at 10661 Highland Ave in historic Garrettsville.

Hours:
Mon: 8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Tue: 8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Wed: Closed
Thu: 8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Fri: 8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Sat: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Payments Accepted:
Cash

Barber of G’ville is a member of the Garrettsville Area Chamber of Commerce. Your continued support of member businesses helps promote the local economy, and funds many of the community activities you enjoy.

Garrettsville – The family-owned independent insurance agency, now know as The Ryser Agency, has been serving the Garrettsville area and Northeast Ohio for over seventy years.   Owned and operated by Matt Ryser since 1994, The Ryser Agency is a full-service agency that specializes in farm, auto, home, and small business insurance coverage.

ryser-picFormerly known as the Reynolds Agency and owned by Ryser’s aunt and uncle, Ryser began working as a customer service representative and property inspector for them while he attended the University of Akron.  After earning his degree in 1989, Matt accepted a full-time agent position with the agency and worked his way up over the next few years to become the manager of the agency.  Matt and his wife Amy purchased the agency from his aunt and uncle in 1994.

As an independent insurance agency, The Ryser agency represents several insurance companies so it can offer clients a wider choice of auto, home, business, and life coverage to better meet their needs and pocketbook.

But more importantly, Matt’s number one goal for his agency is impeccable customer service.  Matt learned early from his aunt and uncle the importance of providing good service to everyone in need no matter their circumstances and he has strived to maintain the values they instilled.  To better serve those goals and values, Matt has brought in Evonne Fox as a new agent and customer service representative.

Many will recognize Evonne’s smiling face and friendly demeanor from her time at the local hardware store, however, what they might not know is that Evonne brings with her years of experience in the insurance industry.

Evonne began working in administrative support and quality control in the commercial division at Nationwide Insurance in 1982 and later she worked for her husband Ken’s own Nationwide Agency here in Garrettsville.  Shortly after Ken closed his agency in 2001 to return to teaching, Evonne earned her property and casualty license and worked for a newly opened Allstate Insurance office here in Garrettsville.  Unfortunately, that office closed in 2006.

Evonne is thrilled to be back working in the insurance industry.  She says a lot has changed when it comes to understanding the industry and coverage, but the one thing that hasn’t is the need for good customer service.

Joyce Jones also assists Matt and Evonne in the office a couple of days a week.  Joyce has been with the agency a long time and enhances the agency’s customer service philosophy.

Matt and Evonne don’t just advise clients about insurance,  they take a vested interest in their clients needs.  They can recommend loss-prevention ideas that can cut costs and if a loss occurs, they will stand with their client until the claim is settled.

The Ryser Insurance Agency has grown significantly over the years, but continues to operate, as their website says, “with a home-town service philosophy”.  Matt and Evonne both have raised their families in the community and continue to stay involved and make every effort to show their clients the same respect they do their neighbors, friends and family.

The Ryser agency is located at 10878 North Street, across from the Charles Auto Family Dealership.  More information can be obtained from the agency web site: http://ryserinsurance.com or by calling the office at 330-527-5626.  Or better yet, stop in and say “Hi” to see what The Ryser Agency may be able to do for you.

 

ken-fox-music-teacher-retirement-garrettsville-garfield-elementary“Twelve years, 36 concerts and over 20,000 attendees” is how James A. Garfield Superintendent Ted Lysiak introduced elementary school music teacher Mr. Ken Fox for his farewell concert last week.  Fox, who will be retiring from teaching at the end of this school year, said he will miss his students and is very appreciative of the opportunity he has had to work with them.

Last Tuesday the first grade students performed the night’s concert, titled Green.  The students, decked out in green leaf leis, danced, clapped, jumped and sang along with their teacher in a lively tribute to Earth Day offering readings and musical selections including “It’s Easy Bein’ Green”, “Nature Baby”, My Earth, and “What Do You Do With A Water Waster”.

Mr. Fox plans to keep busy after his retirement and is considering all his options.  When asked what he felt his greatest accomplishment in the past twelve years of teaching was he said it is when former students make a point of “looking him up and saying hello”.

Garrettsville – In their first council meeting since the fire on March 22 that destroyed a significant portion of downtown businesses, council was proactive in taking steps toward a rebuilding effort.  Upon the recommendation of the planning commission, council approved Ordinance 2014-18, which waives zoning fees that would be charged in the rebuilding process for properties impacted by the fire.  Council also approved Ordinance 2014-16, a tax abatement program focused toward community reinvestment.  

Garrettsville – The main topic of discussion after the opening of the March 12, 2014 Garrettsville village council meeting was water rates and how much of an increase there will be if council approves proposed Ordinance 2014-13.  The Board of Public Affairs (BPA) had asked a representative from Arcadis in February 2013 about a rate study for the village water utility that could be used to plan and budget future water projects and to assure current rates were adequate.  (Arcadis is company that specializes in infrastructure and water planning & design which  has consulted on infrastructure projects like the State Street water main replacement project last year and the coming Liberty Street bridge replacement project.)

Garrettsville -  The January 8, 2014 Garrettsville village council meeting opened welcoming new councilman Tom Hardesty (Hardesty was elected last November and replaces retired Councilman Bob Matson).  Immediately the floor opened for nominations for council president.  Councilwoman Becky Harrington nominated Tom Hardesty for the job.  The motion was seconded and council voted him in.   Hardesty’s first act was to open a public hearing to discuss proposed Ordinances 2013-39 and 2013-40 which would eliminate the requirement that business signage be reviewed by the Design Review Board and would allow the zoning department to approve applications for signs that meet current codes.
There was no public comment – actually, there was only one resident in attendance in the audience.  Hardesty closed the hearing and regular session began.  Minutes from the last council meeting were approved with corrections.  Council then discussed revenue, expenditure, cash balances and income tax reports.  

Garrettsville – At the November 13th village council meeting, Mayor Rick Patrick introduced Nelson Township Trustee Tom Matota.  Matota addressed council about the issues over chip/seal to Brosius Road that the township and village share responsibility for.  Matota explained his understanding of how ODOT divided up roads for maintenance.  Matota also stated it appears that Nelson Township’s assigned responsibility actually extends approximately 400 feet further than originally thought toward Silica Street.  Matota said that the township would maintain the portion of the road assigned to them.  He also said that the Township couldn’t always commit funds, especially on short notice.  

Garrettsville – Are you wondering what is a ‘walkable neighborhood’?  If you Google the term, it is broadly defined as a community that is a desirable place to live, work, learn, worship and play.  It fosters smart growth because goods (such as housing, offices, and retail) and services (such as transportation, schools, libraries) are located within an easy and safe walk of each other.  Walkable neighborhoods foster pedestrian activity by mixing land uses, building compactly and ensuring safe and inviting pedestrian corridors.

Garrettsville – A Public Hearing was held September 11, 2013 prior to the regularly scheduled council meeting for Proposed Ordinance 2013-30 that would amend the current zoning codes to allow for a “walkable neighborhood” overlay district in the current R-2 residential zoned district.  Dave Harrington of The Reserve at Eagle Creek and Fox Hollow Developments stated that a lot of the people that have considered moving to Garrettsville and have come to the Fox Hollow Development to look are discouraged by of the amount of land that they would have to take care of if they purchased a lot to build on.  Currently zoning requires a minimum of a half-acre lot for single-family homes.  

Garrettsville – –  Minutes from both the regular May 8, 2013 meeting and the June 1, 2013 special council meeting which authorized the mayor and clerk to enter into an agreement for the provision of dispatching services for the Windham Village Police Department were approved.  Immediately after, discussion ensued about the state of the village’s finances.  The current report shows that approximately $94,000 has been expended more than current revenues.  Councilman Matson asked clerk/treasurer Nancy Baldwin, “Are we in trouble?” to which she replied, “We could be”.

Garrettsville –  Village Council, by a unanimous vote, approved the appointment of Matthew Noah as a new full-time police officer for the village.  Noah’s appointment fills the position left vacant by the retirement of Officer Mark Rich.  Councilman Kaiser, a member of the village’s safety committee, stated that there were two great candidates for the position, and it was a difficult pick.  Noah brings great experience with him including his work with the Portage County Drug Task Force.

Garrettsville –  Representatives from the James A. Garfield Historical Society and all three Portage County Commissioners, Kathleen Chandler, Maureen Fredrick, Tommie Jo Marsilio, were present at the last regularly scheduled Village Council meeting held April 10, to present their ideas on the old Paul’s Feed Mill building at the east end of downtown and elicit cooperation and support from Village Council.

James Mayer of the historical society gave a brief history of the 1852 structure and of its importance to the village.  He also stated that though the historical society hoped to save the original structure, they had yet to develop a clear-cut plan of how to do so.  He presented a rough sketch of what the property could be transformed into.  The plan showed the front building at the intersection of Main and Center Streets, and a parking area with a scenic overlook behind the structure where currently buildings two and three of the feed mill are located.  Mr. Mayer went on to say that they had just begun to look into grants to finance the project.  Many of them required some sort of matching funds and or needed to be submitted by a government agency.  He asked for a formal commitment from council to support the society’s endeavor.  He also asked for financial support if council was able to provide it.  Mayer stated that in addition to funding issues, the current owner of the property intends to have the building razed by June 10, 2013.  

Garrettsville – A Public Hearing was held prior the regularly scheduled Village Council meeting March 13, to discuss proposed restructuring of the Design Review Board (DRB).   Residents and business owners discussed the opinions and asked questions about the proposed ordinance.  Mayor Patrick assured everyone that if these changes were made the Historic District would not be affected.  Solicitor Stuck added that the existing laws and rules pertaining to zoning would still be in effect.  Mayor Patrick also explained that the DRB as it is now, is only an advisory committee.  The Planning Commission makes the final decisions.  These proposed changes would only streamline a currently cumbersome process.  The proposed new legislation does allow for the re-establishment of the DRB in the future if it is deemed necessary.

Garrettsville – Village Council met on Wednesday, February 13, 2013 for their regularly scheduled monthly meeting.   The public hearing that had been scheduled at last month’s council meeting to discuss proposed restructuring of the Design Review Board (DRB) was postponed due to an error in publishing the announcement.  Instead, proposed Ordinance 2013-01 was presented for second reading.  The Mayor stated that the Planning Commission, at their last meeting, voted to give their support and recommend passage of the proposed ordinance as well.

Garrettsville – Sugar Bush Golf Club, owned by the Koval family, was recently awarded The Small Business Leadership Award at The National Philanthropy Day Awards Celebration hosted by the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) North Central Ohio Chapter.  The awards luncheon, which was held November 9, 2012 at the Hilton Akron/Fairlawn, celebrated the work of the Kovals and six other honorees for their philanthropic contributions.

Garrettsville – Village Council, at the November 14, 2012 council meeting, voted down proposed Ordinance 2012-15 that would have enacted an exterior maintenance code for every property (residential and commercial) in the Village.  Council had tabled the ordinance and sent it back to the Planning Commission to rework it after receiving much opposition from residents at the Public Hearing held before the August 8, 2012 Council Meeting.  The Planning Commission sent it back to Council with a recommendation for final consideration.  Without any discussion, Council un-tabled the Ordinance and unanimously voted it down.  Residents in the gallery thanked Council for listening and supporting their views.

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Project Be Somebody is a not-for-profit, 501(c)(3) organization, with a mission to serve the community.   Lisa Booze, founder of the organization and owner of Lisa’s Little Angel Daycare states her goal is to serve the needs of her community and “build a safe environment for our children to grow and develop into responsible community members”.  Lisa is no stranger to giving.  She began her quest to make a difference in her community by giving away Thanksgiving and Christmas baskets to needy families she found out about through her business or word-of-mouth.  Being a go-getter, Lisa knew that she could do more and looked for ways to be more involved.

Garrettsville – The October 10, 2012 council meeting opened with council approving the minutes from regularly scheduled council meeting on September 12, 2012.   Revenue, expenditure, cash balance, and income tax reports were all reviewed.  The Mayor stated that the income tax report “looked good”.  It was also reported that collection of delinquent taxes was still ongoing and many of those that negotiated payment plans needed ‘encouragement’ to make timely payments.  Another round of notices would also be sent out soon.

Garrettsville – Four Seasons Industries and Durajoint Concrete Accessories will both be moving to a new home, and luckily it is right here in Garrettsville!  Michael E. Diskin, owner of both companies, recently purchased the empty Amweld building on Industrial Drive and has been busy renovating the structure in preparation of moving his companies.

Garrettsville – The September 12, 2012 council meeting opened with council approving the minutes from special council meetings that were held in July and August dealing with the resignation of councilwoman Karen Clyde, the death of Mayor Moser and appointment of Council President Rick Patrick as Mayor, and the filling of two vacant council seats by new appointees Becky Harrington, and Chris Anderson.  Minutes from regularly scheduled council meeting on August 8, 2012 were also approved.
Revenue, expenditure, cash balance, and income tax reports were all reviewed.  It was reported that 310 residents who failed to file their 2011 income tax forms had been notified by mail.  To date, 77 of those had responded to the letters they received.
Ordinance 2012-23 amending the “Village of Garrettsville, Portage County, Ohio, Employee Handbook” was brought up for discussion.  The amendment clarifies part-time employee status as defined by hours worked.  The new amendment will classify employees as part-time for any position if they work less than 40 hours per week.  Council unanimously passed the proposed ordinance.

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The LAF SOMe group (That is Life After 50, Seniors on the Move for those of you not familiar with the moniker) headed out on a full bus last Wednesday for a fun-filled adventure.  Our destination was the Seneca Niagara Casino in Niagara Falls, NY.  The casino is located a short walk from Niagara Falls State Park where the American Falls can be viewed from walkways along Prospect Point Park.
Many of us walked and some caught a cab over to view the splendor of The Falls.  Once there, the trails in the state park led us right up to the edge of the thundering wonder and breathtaking beauty of the three massive waterfalls.  Getting close enough to almost touch the millions of gallons of water that rocket over The Falls every minute inspired genuine awe.
Personally, I had never visited The Falls from the American side.  I was impressed with the extent of the park system and its amenities.  I was told there was no closer place to feel Niagara’s flow than from the vista points and trails of Niagara Falls State Park, which also happens to be America’s oldest state park.
Back at the casino, we entertained ourselves with over 4,200 slot machines and over 100 gaming tables!   We all had disembarked with high hopes of “hitting the big one”, but many of us returned a little lighter in the wallet!
The casino was upgrading the computer system on the day we went, so instead of a free-play slot bonus, we were awarded a free buffet meal at the Thunder Falls Buffet.  The food and the service were both exemplary.  The all-you-can-eat buffet offered eight serving stations with enough variety to satiate every pallet.
The food, The Falls and the company made the afternoon quite enjoyable!  Consider joining us for our next bus trip.  Later this fall we a planning a progressive luncheon/winery tour that will include several stops and opportunities for shopping too!
Keep reading the Villager for more information.  Any adult over 21 can attend our trips and there are no membership requirements.

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Barber poles, with their swirling red, white and blue stripes, in our lifetime, have always meant a place for men to get a haircut.  Did you ever wonder what is it about the red, white, and sometimes blue stripes that mean “barber”, or how that symbol came to represent the profession?   In modern times, the term “barber” is used both as a professional title and to refer to hairdressers who specialize in men’s hair.  But “barber” didn’t always mean that and the symbol of the barber pole came from a time when the art of hair and beard trimming, medicine, dentistry and surgery were all performed by the same person.  

Garrettsville –  Proposed Ordinance 2012-15 that would create an exterior maintenance code for the Village was up for a second reading.  A Public Hearing on the proposed ordinance will be held before the August 8  council meeting.    If  passed, the ordinance will require that all properties within the Village be maintained to the code standards and will give the zoning inspector authority to investigate any observed or reported violations.