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A Cinderella Story

Once upon a time — last Saturday night, in fact — my husband and I had the opportunity to transport our two princesses to the nearby land of Mantua. While we didn’t take a coach and ball gowns were optional, our princesses were delighted at the events that unfolded. 

Pictured above are Prince Christopher (David Bowles) and Cinderella (Amber Harrison) at Crestwood Drama Club’s production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella.

Pictured above are Prince Christopher (David Bowles) and Cinderella (Amber Harrison) at Crestwood Drama Club’s production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella.

In case you missed the official decree, the festivities to which I refer convey the timeless tale of the transformation of a scullery maid into a princess, and that of a High School gymnasium into a musical performance hall. Both transformations captivated audiences at Crestwood High School this weekend when the Crestwood Drama Club and Orchestra presented Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “Cinderella”.

Happily, our princesses were not the only ones at the royal event, as royalty of all ages were in attendance. One highlight of the show included the magical arrival of Cinderella’s (Amber Harrison) coach, transporting her through the floor seats and orchestra ‘pit’ to the Royal Ballroom on stage. The young princes and princesses in the crowd also enjoyed close-up views of the action, as Prince Christopher (David Bowles) and his servant Lionel, played by Nathan Pallotto, searched for Cinderella throughout the kingdom, or rather, the auditorium. Lucky audience members had a first-hand view as several maidens seated throughout the audience tried unsuccessfully to squeeze into Cinderella’s glass slipper.

When asked which character they might like to play, not surprisingly, our youngest preferred Cinderella, with her beautiful voice and gorgeous dress. The older princess, however, quickly stated her preference for the role of the tell-it-like-it-is Fairy Godmother, played by Nikki Nero. Her explanation was matter-of-fact, stating, “she didn’t have to sing the whole time, didn’t have to dance, and she didn’t have to keep changing her clothes.”

Gladly, today’s princesses don’t feel the need to shoehorn themselves into other people’s ideals. And we all lived happily ever after… at least until bedtime.

 

 

 

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