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A New Mayor For Newton Falls

Newton Falls – This election season residents of Newton Falls visited the polls, not once, but twice.
In addition to the usual opportunity to vote for various state officials and cast a yea or nay toward potential levies, a special election was held on Thursday regarding what could arguably be the recognized figurehead of the town: the mayoral seat. The occasion was unusual because voters had two questions to answer: first, whether or not the current mayor, Mr. Pat Layshock, should remain in the position or if he should be removed from office, vacating the seat earlier than the expected end of his term. The second question offered a choice among three candidates vying to be Mayor Layshock’s successor should he, in fact, be recalled.
For months the council meetings in Newton Falls have been tense, with council voting consistently split; a 3-2 vote is common on most issues. Members of the public who wish to stand and speak at the forum often feel they are not being heard and their concerns are not being taken seriously. Many residents blame this discord on what they call Mr. Layshock’s ineffective management and personal issues amongst the various city officials affecting the productivity of the meetings.
The public had their say last week at the polls.
Mr. Layshock was indeed recalled.
With a tally of 526 to 500, the ballot results were split nearly down the middle, but the count weighs against the current mayor. Taking his place will be Lyle Waddell, a vocal resident of Newton Falls with city experience who intends to bring professionalism back to the council meetings. Referring to the gatherings as business meetings – in other words not the appropriate time and place to carry out personal agendas – Mr. Waddell hopes that under his leadership potential grievances will be guided through the proper channels. Mr. Waddell will take office as the new mayor after the Board of Election verifies submitted provisional ballots and the final vote becomes official. However, even if all 17 reported provisional ballots happened to be in Mr. Layshock’s favor, it would not be enough to alter the already counted outcome.
Open to the public, council meetings are currently held at the Community Center on Quarry Street, the first and third Monday of each month at 6pm, or can (usually) be viewed on the public access channel for those who wish to watch from the comfort of their homes. Only time will tell if Newton Falls can expect new episodes in the fall line-up, or if citizens will simply be watching reruns of the same old storyline unfolding with a new leading man at the helm.

Newton Falls – This election season residents of Newton Falls visited the polls, not once, but twice. In addition to the usual opportunity to vote for various state officials and cast a yea or nay toward potential levies, a special election was held on Thursday regarding what could arguably be the recognized figurehead of the town: the mayoral seat. The occasion was unusual because voters had two questions to answer: first, whether or not the current mayor, Mr. Pat Layshock, should remain in the position or if he should be removed from office, vacating the seat earlier than the expected end of his term. The second question offered a choice among three candidates vying to be Mayor Layshock’s successor should he, in fact, be recalled.For months the council meetings in Newton Falls have been tense, with council voting consistently split; a 3-2 vote is common on most issues. Members of the public who wish to stand and speak at the forum often feel they are not being heard and their concerns are not being taken seriously. Many residents blame this discord on what they call Mr. Layshock’s ineffective management and personal issues amongst the various city officials affecting the productivity of the meetings. The public had their say last week at the polls.Mr. Layshock was indeed recalled.With a tally of 526 to 500, the ballot results were split nearly down the middle, but the count weighs against the current mayor. Taking his place will be Lyle Waddell, a vocal resident of Newton Falls with city experience who intends to bring professionalism back to the council meetings. Referring to the gatherings as business meetings – in other words not the appropriate time and place to carry out personal agendas – Mr. Waddell hopes that under his leadership potential grievances will be guided through the proper channels. Mr. Waddell will take office as the new mayor after the Board of Election verifies submitted provisional ballots and the final vote becomes official. However, even if all 17 reported provisional ballots happened to be in Mr. Layshock’s favor, it would not be enough to alter the already counted outcome.Open to the public, council meetings are currently held at the Community Center on Quarry Street, the first and third Monday of each month at 6pm, or can (usually) be viewed on the public access channel for those who wish to watch from the comfort of their homes. Only time will tell if Newton Falls can expect new episodes in the fall line-up, or if citizens will simply be watching reruns of the same old storyline unfolding with a new leading man at the helm.

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